New LPN and no jobs available. - page 6

I live in Tulsa and just received my license 2 weeks ago. The hospitals around here are not hiring LPNs but they were when I started school. I'm a nurse tech at my hospital and human resources wants... Read More

  1. by   happylush
    I received my RN license about two months ago, and there are NO JOBS available where I live. I am working at a local hospital as an LPN still and am just sitting and waiting around and keeping my fingers crossed. I am afraid I will lose all my skills the more I sit and wait............................ ugh...............
  2. by   Jo Dirt
    Quote from happylush
    I received my RN license about two months ago, and there are NO JOBS available where I live. I am working at a local hospital as an LPN still and am just sitting and waiting around and keeping my fingers crossed. I am afraid I will lose all my skills the more I sit and wait............................ ugh...............
    Of course this situation is not typical.
  3. by   happylush
    Quote from LPNtoRN
    Of course this situation is not typical.
    Well, apparently it is in Minnesota!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
  4. by   CHATSDALE
    I can't believe the posts i am reading...really...we have a college, a university with rn programs and a vocational school with lpn courses and we can not find enough warm bodies to fill the vacancies....however it is wise to find jout if there is a going to be a demand for your services b/4 you invest time and money into career training...sometimes we have to bite the bullet and relocate...at least you will get experience and some good things to put on your resume so that if you choose to return you can get a good job...wit the baby boomer retireing and becoming health care receivers and not hc providers i still think that the future is rosy..rethink
  5. by   Quickbeam
    To add to Chatsdale...I know a lot of people who bemoan their job situation but it turns out the "dream job" must be in a single town in a specific county of a certain state. Sometimes, that isn't realistic, even in nursing. Broadening your scope, even considering relocating, can make a huge difference!
  6. by   miraclebeliever
    Dear ladybay,
    I too had a time finding a good job. Many of the people I went to school with settled for a nursing home job but after 4 rotations there I knew that was not for me. I have an 8 yr old and did not have childcare for weekends, the hospital where we did clinicals paid LPN's less than CNAs and I refused to go to work at Walmart for minimum wage after all my hard work. I am 46 and it took me from October of last year until June of this year to find a position so don't give up. I am now working as a middle school nurse, I run my own clinic, do my own triage, and have a consulting nurse I can call if I run into an issue that I need help with. The beauty of it is that I always have nights,weekends, and all holidays off and we are considered part of the teachers retirement system so we have full benefits/medical. The downside of it is that you have a lot of diabetic and asthmatic kids to deal with but you get used to it very quickly. I can't wait until I have the summer off. They divide your pay up into 12 month increments so that you still receive a check in the summer. I love my kids and for me this was a much better alternative than night shift or nursing home. Good luck honey, you will be fine, just trust that God would not have brought you this far if He didn't have the perfect place for you to be. YOU ARE A NURSE AND DON'T LET ANYONE MAKE YOU FEEL LIKE YOU ARE NOT A VITAL PROFESSIONAL!
  7. by   Pbelle
    I know how you feel when you call an agency/potential employer and hear 'we require 6 months - 1 year experience'. When I asked one, 'well, where do I get that experience?' I was told, 'go work in a nursing home'. That situation holds nothing for me, my experience doing LTC during clinicals was that the LPN's were pill-pushers, and nothing more. (Maybe this is different where some of you LTC LPN's work, but it wasn't where I was).

    Here in the Minneapolis/St. Paul area, Allina Hospitals are cutting all LPN's from their hospitals. But there are plenty of clinics/LTC/Acute/Home care facilities that are hiring. Where did you do your internship? Did you inquire with them? I graduate in December and have already begun my job search. I'm planning on going onto an LPN-RN mobility program within the following year, so I figure I'll be able to earn some $$ and gain experience at the same time.

    One thing the nurses at my last rotation told me to do was to bypass HR and go directly to the DON in the area you're interested in. Many times they'll speak with you (ask for an 'informational interview'), and once you've sold yourself to them, a position will be made!

    Good luck!
  8. by   Jo Dirt
    Quote from Pbelle
    I know how you feel when you call an agency/potential employer and hear 'we require 6 months - 1 year experience'. When I asked one, 'well, where do I get that experience?' I was told, 'go work in a nursing home'. That situation holds nothing for me, my experience doing LTC during clinicals was that the LPN's were pill-pushers, and nothing more. (Maybe this is different where some of you LTC LPN's work, but it wasn't where I was).
    You are exactly correct when you refer to LTC LPN's as "pill pushers."
    When my shift starts it is a pill-passing marathon. Some of the nurses wear blisters on their fingers opening those little pill packets. The pill load in many LTC facilities is absolutely RIDICULOUS. Certain doctors have "reputations." You know who has what patient by how many meds. they have. I have ranted and raved before because the pill cart literally was filled to the brim and then the pharmacy shows up that night with another load and there is just nowhere to put the medicines in the cart so I just stick a note on them and put them in the med. room. You wonder how many of those meds. are really necessary (my guess is that half could be eliminated and then some). One doctor at this facility has a reputation for being very conservative with the meds., most of his patients get from 1 to maybe 4 or 5 pills a day...and his patients are the healthiest ones!

    Anyway, I could rant and rave all day on this topic. This is what I do not like about LTC.:angryfire
  9. by   flasandy42
    <<<<as mentioned in another thread, they can't do admissions, can't have a patient with continuous epidural or pca, can't call doctors for orders, can't initiate heparin drips, hang tpn or blood, or give iv push meds.>>>>

    can't do admissions or can't sign them? in my previous hospital we still did the admissions and the rn signed them off...or they wouldn't get done at all since we usually had only one, or sometimes two, rns on the floor. i had done my own admissions for the last 35 years until a few years ago when they decided we weren't capable. i also hung tpn, gave certain iv push meds like reglan and other non-narcotics, set up and took care of heparin drips, tpn, epidurals and pcas. we checked blood with an rn and monitored and d/c'd it. the only thing we couldn't do was spike it....how dumb. i don't know how many times i had to show an rn how to put a filter for blood on our chemo pts. we called doctors and took orders. i was always told that if the hospital trained us to do these things it was legal. i floated to icu and nicu but basically took care of the easier pts who were ready to go back to the floors. i never had to have an rn sign my notes. i never had a vent pt. though....and didn't want one. i just think they are wasting a lot of talent by doing away with lpns, but it's becoming more and more common and harder to find a hospital job. since i worked for 25 years in the same hospital i didn't know what was going on...lol. i'm just glad i'm retired because nursing has changed so much for the worse the last 40 years. it's sad where nursing has gone. i do home health care now and love it. and i do still call the doctors for orders.
  10. by   linzz
    I realize that this thread is old. The thing is, that nothing has changed. Here in Ontario, Canada, many hospitals are hiring few LPN's. I would never have taken this course if I had known. I have not even been able to find a part time LTC (not retirement) job. I can't take casual because I have to arrange child care and can't do it with no notice. I now feel that I need to get my RN just to keep working at something nursing related. Where I live is very anti LPN, in fact we have two general hospitals and one of them has not hired an LPN in over five years and the other hires about 10 a year that are not acutally being bumped from other areas. Uggh!:angryfire
  11. by   allantiques4me
    Quote from Repat
    Actually, wound care nursing is about a whole lot more than &quot;changing dressings&quot;. Just my two cents!
    OMG I was a Wound care nurse for a long time I loved and miss it!!THey Got rid of that position D/T funding cuts at the facility I was at.I would love to do that again. Anyone know of any positions in N/E Ohio??Let me know please.
  12. by   NurseCubanitaRN2b
    Quote from ladybay
    I said that particular wound care nurse position was prn. Plus I said I need to earn a living. I want to utilize my skills like assessments, injections, meds, nursing dx, IV monitors, tube feedings, blood draws and IV's, utilizing a stethoscope, becoming familiar with various medical situations, you know nurse stuff. Med-surg, ER or ICU would be ideal for me. If wound care is more than changing dressings, then educate me. I'm going from what the HR lady said after I asked her what kind of job it was. Even so, wound care is not for me!!

    ladybay
    In the long term care setting in California you will come across residents with tube feedings....you will also come across residents with IV monitors, using your stethoscope (you will use that when you do neuro checks)... blood drawing, not really because they do have Lab Techs who come in and do that....You will also do injections and check Blood Sugar....Assessments, not really sure if LVN's do that in the long term care setting, if they do then it's signed off by the Nursing Supervisor (RN)....someone correct me if I'm wrong....Good Luck and I hope you find the job that you want
  13. by   brendamyheart
    Quote from Hellllllo Nurse
    You can do all of these things and more in a sub-acute/rehab unit in a LTC facility.
    That is right. Look into it. Yo may be surprised.

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