New LPN and no jobs available. - page 4

I live in Tulsa and just received my license 2 weeks ago. The hospitals around here are not hiring LPNs but they were when I started school. I'm a nurse tech at my hospital and human resources wants... Read More

  1. by   ladybay
    New grads leaving the profession in the first two years?! Good Lord! Makes me wonder what am I getting into. I've heard of stories about why nurses leave the profession like rude co-workers, doctors, patients and dangerous working conditions. Oh how I wish LPN's are more respected and taken seriously. I pray to somehow grow some thick skin and make a difference. My hats off to those nurses who hang in there!
  2. by   pickledpepperRN
    Sorry It is new grad RNs leaving so soon after 'reality shock'
    Those who have been LVNs or CNAs stay.
    Staffing is getting better so I think it high time we work for truly adequate staffing in long term care!

    I don't regret my year as a CNS, 19 as an LVN, or 18 as an RN.

    Nothing is better than hearing, "Thank you nurse"

    Stick with it if you have the heart for the work.
    By the way my experience was that my LVN program was much more difficult than the RN program i attended. So much to learn and experience in too little time.
  3. by   marymary
    Quote from spacenurse
    In 1991 the United States Supreme Court designated eight bargaining units for acute care hospital employees.
    I think it unfortunate and misguided that RNs were placed in a separate unit rather than a 'licensed nurse' unit. The fact that we must be in separate units separates nurses when we need to be united. Just my opinion along with many other RNs who value the work of our fellow nurses.

    LVNs in California who attend the CNA CE classes become better educated regarding the legalities of scope of practice.

    The CNA position is that the percentage of LVNs needs to remain the same as before the ratio law or 17% of licensed nurses working in acute care.

    We did get laws passed for scholarships for students accepted into an RN program.
    WE KNOW that many new grad RNs leave the profession in the first two years.
    LVNs and CNAs have proven they are emotionally equipped to handle patient care. They are often the finest RNs.
    I agree with you 1000%. The RN's that I have worked with, the ones that stand out in clinical skills were the ones that were previously LPN's. The ones that were CNA's stood out also but more so because of their perservance pushed them more because they knew that they wanted to be in the health care field; it was not something that they were guessing about in school. They knew what it was like to need someone to care, because they really cared. We all are in this together. But regardless of the job title, it is human nature for one person or group to try to appear above others.
    :hatparty:
    Last edit by marymary on May 25, '04
  4. by   marymary
    Quote from FROGGYLEGS
    Okay. It was only a suggestion. If the people in human resources aren't nurses, I wouldn't quite trust their expert opinion on what exactly a particular job entailed. It didn't occur to me that you didn't want the wound job because it was PRN. I still say wound care is more than just changing dressings. Research it a bit and I think you'll see that, but if it isn't what you want then it isn't what you want.

    Good luck in finding your ideal position.
    It is more than changing dressings. It can get to be quite involved. It is in the mix; Anatomy and Physiology, Microbiology...systems. It is a specialty, kinda like the IV team, only the selected few...
    Last edit by marymary on May 25, '04
  5. by   kjp74631
    Where I work has a skilled nursing unit that you would be able to apply skills that you learned in school, there are also subacute care centers in this area of LTC...Trust in your skills and good luck in your future
  6. by   TexasPoodleMix
    This is exactly my fear. Going thru 2 yrs of school and there being no jobs. That's exactly what happened to me when I graduated with my MA in Counseling... ALL the jobs required experience, etc. etc. The pickings were slim!!!
  7. by   MyReign1
    I believe it has more to do with the facilities than the state. I live in Oklahoma City and every Sunday there are loads of openings for LPNs in the newspaper. I also noticed when I visited Tulsa that the want ads for RN was much slimmer than that of OKC. Good luck in your search!!!
  8. by   C_raye
    Quote from KacyLynnLPN
    A lot of LPN's have posted on here about how no hospitals in their area are hiring LPN's...I live in Indianapolis, Indiana and the hospitals here are clammering for LPN's (as well as RN's) I work in a local hospital and almost everyweek there are several positions open for LPN's, mostly on Med/Surg. I wonder if it has anything to do with the fact that LPN's in this state seem to do a whole lot more then most other states...here in Indy we push IV meds, blood transfusions, assessments (except initial), start IV's, etc... Right now at work we are very short staffed, they are offering a $350 bonus check for picking up extra shifts they deam 'critical' shifts (usually weekends) and that is for the LPN's as well...I wonder if the nursing shortage is particularly bad here in Indiana or what??
    I only wish, I'm a new grad and newly licensed living 100 miles north of Indianaplolis. I live in a rural area, but within a reasonable driving distance to South Bend or northwest Indiana, both major towns that have ads in the paper for all kinds of healthcare workers. I've been looking for a nursing job rather intensely for over a month now, but keep getting told at any facility whether it is a hospital, clinic or nursing home is that I need to have one year's experience. If I don't find anything by fall, I'm planning to just go back to school for my RN, hoping to eventually find a part time postion as an LPN until I finish school.
  9. by   CHATSDALE
    I Know How Frustrating It Must Be To Have Put That Time Into School And Now To Be Put In A Position Where Employment Is Difficult To Impossible To Obtain But Keep At It...it May Be To Your Advantage To Take The Wound Care Job Because It May Lead To Something Else If You Get To Know The Personnel In That Facility

    Something Else Things Go In Cycles...at One Time All The Hospitals Were Going To Be 100% Rn And The Lpns Were Not Be Hired And There Was A Lot Of Talk Of Being Fazed Out...but They Found That They Didnot Have Enough Warm Bodies With Rn Licenses To Give The Care That The Pts Required.
    Also At One Point They Only New Rns That Were Being Hired Were Ex-lpns But That Too Feel By The Wayside Keep Trying There Is A Future Out There
  10. by   ladybay
    Thanks girls for your encouragement. C raye, if you are able to return to school for your RN, by all means do so. It is such a shame to go through school and then have employers tell you you're don't have experience without offering you the job to gain experience. The reason I chose the lpn route first was because I needed to make a little more money than I was as a tech before I could move on to RN. I am not financially able to go through at least 3 years of college to get my RN at this time. As for those employers refusing new grad lpns but want experienced lpn's, is it because no one wants to take the time to train an lpn or find us worthy? I doubt that would be the case with a new grad RN. Not trying to start WWIII, but for whatever the reason we know this is true.

    To chatsdale, it is not to my advantage to take a wound care job at the expense of losing my utilities, car etc. As I've stated before in my original post, that position was and still is for prn only = "we'll call you if we need you" job. I need an 80 hour paycheck every 2 weeks to live from. I have since put in resume's at various nursing homes with snf's and rehabs included in them.

    Could some of you nurses who have been nurses for a while, can someone please tell me the "real" reason you think lpn's are limited to what they can do when we have been trained to do much more? Why does management or whoever calls the shots would rather continue the "nursing shortage" without the aid of lpn's? Using the help of lpn's may not totally solve the problem but we can for sure be of help. I am not a rocket scientist but since there are fewer new grad RN's, it would cost less money to use lpn's IN ADDITION to RN's rather than have an all RN nurse staff, possibly avoiding some serious nurse burnout from the outrageous nurse/patient ratios, long mandatory hours and the compromise of patient care and safety. It could be a win-win situation for everyone.
  11. by   RN-PA
    Quote from ladybay
    Could some of you nurses who have been nurses for a while, can someone please tell me the "real" reason you think lpn's are limited to what they can do when we have been trained to do much more? Why does management or whoever calls the shots would rather continue the "nursing shortage" without the aid of lpn's? Using the help of lpn's may not totally solve the problem but we can for sure be of help. I am not a rocket scientist but since there are fewer new grad RN's, it would cost less money to use lpn's IN ADDITION to RN's rather than have an all RN nurse staff, possibly avoiding some serious nurse burnout from the outrageous nurse/patient ratios, long mandatory hours and the compromise of patient care and safety. It could be a win-win situation for everyone.
    I'm not sure I can tell you the "real" reason for phasing out LPN's at hospitals, only what I'm hearing and observing at my suburban PA hospital. I work with some great LPN's and am thankful for their competence, patient care, and most are teamworkers. On our med-surg unit, our ratios are 1:6/7. (11-7 sometimes has more patients/nurse). The LPN's are the only nurses with a "set ratio" in that we RN's must also care for any needs or problems the LPN's patients have in addition to our own patient assignment. It adds to our already heavy load when we are also calling, on behalf of LPN's, for doctor's orders, signing off new orders, hanging blood products, TPN, giving IV pushes, titrating heparin and narcotic drips, and doing admissions and initial assesments on their new patients. Also, LPN's are not allowed to have patients getting chemo, on narcotic drips, continuous epidurals, or on PCA.

    I recently talked to management about all the tasks LPN's can't perform at our hospital even though the Pennsylvania Code says that they MAY take doctors' orders, for example. (EXCEPT for anything NOT in their scope of practice-- they can't take PCA, IV push, or blood product orders, for instance.) So, to avoid any potential probelms, administration says LPN's cannot call for orders. I asked, "If the RN titrates and cares for the PCA and continuous epidural pumps, can't LPN's take these patients?" The answer is "no". My nursing director said that all hospitals in the area are operating under the same guidelines for LPN's, but it's different at LTC facilities for some reason-- LPN's are often allowed to call for doctor orders.

    It's very frustrating for both the LPN's AND the RN's that LPN's aren't allowed to do more, and it places heavier burdens on the RN's as well. I wish it could be different, but this is reality...

    *Edited to add: I realize I didn't answer your question very well, but my unit director also said that LPN's aren't permitted to do as much because of receiving less education than an RN, but we've all worked with LPN's who often know LOTS more than some RN's (especially the newer RN's) from working and continual self-education.
    Last edit by RN-PA on Jun 5, '04
  12. by   nursejosie
    I work in a LTC and I am an LPN. I have used all my skills I learned in nursing school and then some. Sometimes I feel I am working on the med -surg floor where I did my clincals .. It is very busy , plus we have a skilled unit and some of the patients have I.V`s which my facilty trains LPN`s to be IV certified . I do trach care, and feeding tubes , and as far as wound care goes we do it all , even using wound vac. As a nurse in LTC , you must be very flexible. you can learn all your skills there and also learn how to be a supervisor ( Charge nurse).
    I admit I did go to an RN school and I was learing my skills as an RN. I even went to my psych rotation. That`s another skill you need to use whne you work in LTC , how to speak to the residents with Alztimer and Dementia . So maybe you should atleast give LTC a try.

    Nursejosie
  13. by   NYCRN16
    Another poster had mentioned maybe considering a subacute unit at a LTC facility. The first LTC place I worked at had one, and let me assure you, it was almost the same as the med surg floor in a hospital! Nowadays the hospitals kick the patients out in too short a time, and these patients that are too sick to go home sort of "extend" thier hospital stay in the subacute unit. These patients are not all elderly, there are some young patients who had major surgery, or need some rehab. It ran like a med surg floor, and you will be so busy, you will gain your skills in no time. Look into it at least, you never know!

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