Native Intelligence and LPN

  1. Hello, and thank you for viewing this message.

    I am interested in becoming an LPN, I have an IQ of about 97, no real learning disabilities and have a strong desire to make a change in my personal and professional life. Currently, I am 30 years old, I have no children and am fully ready to commit to the amount of dedication, studying and learning required to become an LPN.

    For about ten years now, I have procrastinated and put of school until this LPN program at a local college started contacting me, inquiring about my interest in the program.

    With my 'average range' I.Q., would I make a good candidate to the program; I have already passed the required TEAS (entrance exam for nursing students) test. My goal is to help those who're suffering, and to provide those people in hospice with the quality loving care that they deserve. This is my passion.

    Thank you for your response!

    -Weber
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  2. 5 Comments

  3. by   elkpark
    I would guess that a majority of licensed, working LPNs and RNs are of average intelligence. Getting through nursing school is more about determination and effort than sheer brilliance.

    I'm concerned about this school that you say contacted you about their program, though. It isn't a for-profit school by any chance, is it? They are notorious for their aggressive sales tactics and overpriced tuition.
  4. by   Weber
    Hi elkpark! Thank you for your prompt response. Yes, it happens to be a for-profit institution that has regional accreditation here in the Charlotte, North Carolina area. The school molds great nurses, and their programs are top notch. I haven't had any students complain about the institution, however, it's quite the contrary: many students praise the instructors and faculty for helping their students achieve success in their chosen path.
  5. by   teatimeofthesoul
    I.Q. tests are only looking at certain areas of intelligence. Please don't let that number have any influence on your choice. The only thing you have to lose is money (if you don't pass, or don't like it). I would suggest taking your prerequisite classes before the actual program, and pay for them out of pocket. You are still young, so I wouldn't get in a big hurry. For me, owing a bunch of student loans has been a huge stress. I wouldn't wish that on anyone.
  6. by   NurseSpeedy
    Quote from elkpark
    I would guess that a majority of licensed, working LPNs and RNs are of average intelligence. Getting through nursing school is more about determination and effort than sheer brilliance.

    I'm concerned about this school that you say contacted you about their program, though. It isn't a for-profit school by any chance, is it? They are notorious for their aggressive sales tactics and overpriced tuition.
    Yeah, I learned that from Rasmussen. They kept calling, emailing, and text bombing my phone even after I told them I was not interested. One text I replied back with "graduated from another schools program a few months ago. Please stop".

    Good schools don't need to cold call potential students.
  7. by   mikefilmstudent
    I can answer that from my experience with my double degree in Math and Physics from my undergrad and two graduate degrees from MBA and MFA as well as my disability (Anxiety-depressive disorder not bi-polar). Passion and dedication are the most important thing. Although I had shown my high IQ when I was really young, I didnt know what I wanted to do. Therefore, I wasted my times and money to get degrees after degrees.

    If you can pass tea test with a good score and deal with the requirement pre-req's GPA, your dedication will ensure you to finish the program.

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