Medical assistants and LPNs - page 14

HI all, I have just finished a medical assisting program and im now looking for a job. I have noticed alot of job openings for lpn but nothing for medical assistants. I was wondering first of... Read More

  1. by   ink10300
    Quote from militarymom06
    Comparing a MA to an LPN is like comparing an LPN to an RN...they are different. Yes, an LPN can do much the same as an RN, in GA...but, there are alot of things an RN can do that an LPN cannot do. Same with MA's. Yes, the schooling is similar, but an LPN is licensed, and MA's aren't.
    I am an LPN and the difference is that I know the RN has more responsibility, (that I am often great-full I don't have), as well as knowledge. Period. We are similar, however it would be like saying a Vice President of a company is the same as a Manager.
    And the same goes for MA to LPN. There is more responsibility on the licensed nurse with the added expectation of their more in-depth knowledge of disease processes, body systems and assessment and intervention techniques and therefore an ability to function more independently. But that is only my opinion.
  2. by   kozina0209
    I have been a registered medical assistant for 13 years. Unfortunately, you are going to find that your certification is not worth having, unless you get that "dream job" where you get hired on at a hospital and make the good money.

    I have found that a CNA certification is higher than an MA and that just a few years as a CNA and you can challenge the LVN exam.(At least in California that is how it is) Even though my MA program was more intensive than the CNA, I cannot challenge the CNA. So, I went and got my CNA certification and make $5 less per hour, just to accumlate the hours to challenge the LVN.

    I have 4 kids (13, 11, 6 and 8 months and my 13 year old has Autism)and am trying to find LVN classes I can take online. My clinicals are easy to set up. I just can't be committed to a full-time program which doesn't allow me to be there for my kids, epecially my Autistic son. My husband works fulltime 2 hours away from where we live and of course I still have to work....

    It's fustrating....good luck!
  3. by   pagandeva2000
    I am not sure if they will offer LPN programs on line-I mean they might...there are all sorts of programs popping up that one never suspects, but I haven't heard of them. I even heard in the CNA forum that those classes are now offered on line. Also, from what I heard, the CNA can challenge the LPN exam in California, but they are limited to work in California, only. If you don't plan to relocate in your life, then, that may be a sure fit for you.

    Best of luck to you and your children, though, and I hope that you do get a chance to challenge the exam to bring better opportunities in life for yourself and family.
  4. by   kozina0209
    No there are not any LPN/LVN programs online and if there are I cannot find them!! I have searched high and low!!

    It's very fustrating to have all these credentials and experience and resources...and I can't use any of them!

    I did find one part-time program(2 days a week; 1 day classroom 1 day clinical) that would take me almost 3 years to do....but with all the babies at home, I have to do what I have to do!!

    Thanks for the response!!
  5. by   lillyofthevalley
    Before you read this, just know, that I love all the CNA and MA on there. But this is the real world. And I have to be honest.

    Ok, You CANNOT do all the things that a LVN can do. She is a licensed nurse, and you are a unlicensed personnel. Yes, there are somethings that you can do, that a LVN can do, like give the patient a sponge bath. But an RN is also authorized to do those things of she wanted to, does that mean that you can take a RNs job?
    Also, In a LTC setting, an LVN( in Texas) can practice as a MDS coordinator, and can even go as far as being a ADON. With you educational background to become a MA, you would not be able to qualify for this type of job.
    Depending on what position you are trying to apply for, you MAY be called in for interview, but you would only be able to do the things that you are trained to do. And since you would not be able to perform all the required duties because you are not a LVN, its highly unlikely that you would get the job.
    Hopefully you will be able to find the job thats best for you, and Good Luck.
  6. by   ink10300
    Quote from Ckozina0209
    No there are not any LPN/LVN programs online and if there are I cannot find them!! I have searched high and low!!

    It's very fustrating to have all these credentials and experience and resources...and I can't use any of them!

    I did find one part-time program(2 days a week; 1 day classroom 1 day clinical) that would take me almost 3 years to do....but with all the babies at home, I have to do what I have to do!!

    Thanks for the response!!
    I just moved out of California. Unfortunately, they do not have any accredited on-line LVN programs available yet. They are still looked down upon out there.
    However, there are public schools that sometimes offer the program at a decent tution or you may look into a scholarship program, check out the nursing associations.
    Before I went back to school, I looked into challenging the boards as well, I am really glad I did not.
    NCLEX is a very difficult test - it's made to be. Even though you feel you don't have time, it would be worth it to spend that year working extra hard, to give yourself better odds of passing.
    Another thing about challenging the boards also, you would have to take a pharmacology course- 54 hrs. and your employer would have to endorse you, vouching for your clinical skills. Being as you were an MA, you do have allot of the clinical experience.
    Why can't you challenge the board as an MA. EMT's are allowed. That's crazy.
    I still wholeheartedly think it's a better idea to go through school. Your kids will be so proud of you and what you accomplished-, and they will remember cheering you on when you graduate- you will be their inspiration in high school and college.
    My daughter was at my graduation. I do not regret it for one second. It was a tough year- I would do it all over again- (and I should for the RN.. I want to get the loan paid off first- I'm finally down to $15,000.00)
    Good luck to you- sorry for the rambling...
  7. by   asoonernurse
    Quote from ink10300
    Exceptions:

    In Alaska: under Alaska Statutes and The Alaska Administrative Code, properly trained and certified medical assistants can insert urinary catheters, and start IV tubing, and administer medications as ordered in that IV under the direction of a physician. However, these tasks, or any other patient care tasks CANNOT be delegated by a RN nurse in that state. As a matter of fact, medical assistants can't do anything supervised by a nurse. A medical doctor MUST be present at all times.
    Where as an LPN works under the supervision of an RN- but one does not have to be in the building- or present at all times.
    In Florida, you can also do things out of scope- so long as the delegating RN or MD is present. This includes IV chemo, blood products, and IV pushes- providing you have been properly trained and are under DIRECT supervision.
    See, now here's where it gets tricky. No doctor is going to take the time (or bother) to "be present" every single time his or her MA inserts a urinary catheter, starts an IV , or administers medications as ordered in that IV. Why pay someone to do it if he or she is already there? Doctors hire MA's to do things FOR them, so that they don't have to...

    What's going to happen here is that a well-meaning MA is going to kill someone, or several someone's, and then the state (or the feds) are going to step in with some hard and fast rules (much like they did in California with the nurses aide's, now known as CERTIFIED nurses aides due to the mandatory schooling and background checks that the state mandated after a couple of shocking reports on the news.)

    Simple as that.

    Regards,

    Michael
  8. by   asoonernurse
    Theresa Vicker, the medical assistant who administered the treatment, said Kerry's office regularly administered chelation therapy to adults, but not as an IV push. She said Nadama's was the only IV push she ever did.
    "When I was finished with the administration of the mixture, I was switching syringes to push in the saline and Tariq quit breathing," Vicker told the AP.
    ...because Theresa had no clue what the medication would 1) do to the respiratory system (obviously depress it a'la opiods) 2) that the child would become hypocalemic 3) if she was giving the "correct" dosage to a child and 4) WOULD have known to stop, double check the dosage, confirm it is the correct mg/kg, and check the drug book for contraindications and side effects of the drug she was administering.

    Nurses are TRAINED to do this automatically (i.e. the "triple check") during our schooling. In fact, it is pounded into our heads on a daily basis. Our instructors know that, yes, doctors DO make medication errors when prescribing and yes, it is OUR duty to double check anything and everything...

    ....and don't forget, ladies, document, document, document! :chuckle

    Regards,

    Michael
  9. by   asoonernurse
    Quote from ink10300
    I just moved out of California. Unfortunately, they do not have any accredited on-line LVN programs available yet. They are still looked down upon out there.
    However, there are public schools that sometimes offer the program at a decent tution or you may look into a scholarship program, check out the nursing associations.
    Before I went back to school, I looked into challenging the boards as well, I am really glad I did not.
    NCLEX is a very difficult test - it's made to be. Even though you feel you don't have time, it would be worth it to spend that year working extra hard, to give yourself better odds of passing.
    Another thing about challenging the boards also, you would have to take a pharmacology course- 54 hrs. and your employer would have to endorse you, vouching for your clinical skills. Being as you were an MA, you do have allot of the clinical experience.
    Why can't you challenge the board as an MA. EMT's are allowed. That's crazy.
    I still wholeheartedly think it's a better idea to go through school. Your kids will be so proud of you and what you accomplished-, and they will remember cheering you on when you graduate- you will be their inspiration in high school and college.
    My daughter was at my graduation. I do not regret it for one second. It was a tough year- I would do it all over again- (and I should for the RN.. I want to get the loan paid off first- I'm finally down to $15,000.00)
    Good luck to you- sorry for the rambling...
    I'm curious as to what percentage of CNAs and EMTs actually make a successful challenge of the board.

    I mean, I worked as a CNA for almost ten years, as an EMT for 2 years and a EMT-P for 8 months.

    I've a few more weeks left in my LVN program, and there is NO WAY I would have passed the NCLEX armed only with what I knew as a CNA/EMT.

    Critical thinking skills, nursing diagnoses and prioritizing was SO not part of my CNA/EMT training!

    Just my , folks.

    Regards,

    Michael
  10. by   kozina0209
    It's not the ideal situation to "challenge" a profession such as going from a CNA to LVN, however there are many reasons i have to consider this an option: my situation with my 4 children esspecially my oldest sons Autism, trying to juggle a two income household, 4 kids and then to throw LVN school into the mix...., the fact that all the "private" schools cost $20k plus, and all of the local Junior colleges that offer LVn, it's on a lottery system and I'm 38 and when I'm ready to move to the next level, I can't wait to be the "chosen" one.

    My mother has been an RN for 17 years, prior to that was an LVN for 15 years. She knows lots of CNA's who have challenged the LVn and pased. I think it depends on where you get your training, not saying that you didn't get adequate training, and how you learn as a person. THere are so many resources out there to prepare you for method #3, I don't think it's ideal for everyone. Personally, it may be the only way for me to get to the next level.

    Christina
  11. by   411
    you might want to check around on that one there are many things a ma can do that an lpn cant do experience is the big key word here i have been through the exact same training that the lpn in my office has been through and even more when my patients call they want to speak to the "nurse" around here this would be me all orders are taken from my dr and documented lpn and ma are interchangeable
  12. by   tothepointeLVN
    Yes but unlike what your username says if you are a MA and not a Lpn/LVN/RN then you are not a nurse and don't have a license. it doesn't really matter what your doctor has you do since you don't really have a scope of practice to work within and are working under the doctor's license.

    The only place where MA and lpn's do the same job is in the Dr's Office. I in no way intend to out anyone one down but the opportunities a MA has are limited somewhat.
  13. by   OgopogoLPN
    Quote from 411
    you might want to check around on that one there are many things a ma can do that an lpn cant do experience is the big key word here i have been through the exact same training that the lpn in my office has been through and even more when my patients call they want to speak to the "nurse" around here this would be me all orders are taken from my dr and documented lpn and ma are interchangeable
    You might want to start with correct grammar, punctuation and sentences...

    Anyways, you don't have the same training as an LPN since he/she is licensed and you are not. He/she has been to nursing school, not MA school.

    LPN and MA are not interchangeable. I will be licensed in 2 weeks and I can work on an acute medical-surgical ward at a hospital. I can perform assessments, wound care, transcribe doctors orders, admin all routes of meds except IV and many other tasks. An MA cannot do these things.

    I agree with the above poster that the LPN/MA job is very similar in a doctor's office, but not in other settings.

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