Mature LPN's Treated Unfairly - page 2

by FrustratedLPN | 2,979 Views | 18 Comments

Just wanting to know if anyone else has experienced any of these issues. As an LPN of 16 yrs., and almost 60 years old, I find myself on the "outside, looking in" quite frequently. Needless to say, I'm the oldest floor nurse... Read More


  1. 1
    Quote from MrsBradyMom
    You all are scaring me. I want nothing more than to work with the elderly when I graduate in December. My rotations in LTC have felt like "home". After reading some of these posts, I don't know now. The elderly need advocates....what's the point of working in LTC if management won't let me do that? Perhaps I should remove my rose colored glasses. Now I'm depressed.
    Don't be depressed! If that is your calling go to LTC while working towards your RN...ask when you interview at LTCs what their long-range goals are for staffing, as in will they be placing LPNs in any/all phases of the shifts and managements. Get it in writing, lol.

    And congrats on being a grad this December!
    BearyPrivate likes this.
  2. 0
    I wanted to spend my time in Geriatrics. My rose coloured glasses lasted nearly three years. I worked understaffed, was verbally abused by family members who dropped by maybe once a month (we charted family visits), was scratched, punched, kicked, and slapped by seniors, and worked every damn shift I was asked. My overtime days were changed to save the facility money by paying me straight time for the extra weekend shifts.

    I thank God that I left because my husband's employer transferred him.

    The place was running before me and has continued on since I left. Nurses are expendable and replaceable.
  3. 1
    I too am a very frustrated LPN. I've been in it for 20 years, have worked many different areas to learn as much as I can, and I'm finding now I am being passed over for certain jobs because I cost too much!!! I've been looking for an office job within the system through which I am employed (it's quite extensive) and I am continually being passed over because I cost more due to my years there.
    Nursing is definitely not the same as it was when I started.
    BearyPrivate likes this.
  4. 1
    I am sorry that these stories scared you, but it is better to take off the rose colored glasses than to just walk into it and fall into a bear trap. It may not be that each place is this way, but with the high ratios of patients to nurses, even the places that are nice are not always able to take care of their patients the way that they should.
    BearyPrivate likes this.
  5. 0
    Quote from MrsBradyMom
    You all are scaring me. I want nothing more than to work with the elderly when I graduate in December. My rotations in LTC have felt like "home". After reading some of these posts, I don't know now. The elderly need advocates....what's the point of working in LTC if management won't let me do that? Perhaps I should remove my rose colored glasses. Now I'm depressed.
    Don't be depressed or discouraged. The elderly need caring, loving nurses to care for them. These LPN's are right, as scary as it sounds. The government could do so much more for the elderly and LTC but they turn a blind eye. My LTC facility sound much like Frustrated LPN's does I've been in LTC for 15 yrs and I too have lost more than one job d/t standing up for pt's who could not stand up for themselves. Keep your chin up, do the best you can to help where you can, and show these wise elderly pt's they still matter to you.
  6. 0
    Quote from MrsBradyMom
    You all are scaring me. I want nothing more than to work with the elderly when I graduate in December. My rotations in LTC have felt like "home". After reading some of these posts, I don't know now. The elderly need advocates....what's the point of working in LTC if management won't let me do that? Perhaps I should remove my rose colored glasses. Now I'm depressed.

    First of all, remove the term "rose-colored glasses" from your vocabulary. You need to approach your work with patients with open eyes and realism, but that term is far too often used by people to discredit those among us who have the heart and the passion to do the things most are too afraid, too frustrated, too worn out to do in life. I'm not making a value judgement against those who are afraid, frustrated or tired. I am just telling you not to allow their judgement become yours, particularly when it comes to what you feel you are called to do in life.

    If your heart is with working with the elderly, if that is what feels like "home" to you, I hope you will listen to your own instincts first and foremost.

    Truth? You will run into cynical management with limited vision. You will encounter family members who make you want to pull every hair on your head out. You will be told by fellow staff members that minimal physical care is adequate for the elderly and there is no need to bother yourself with the hearts and minds of geriatric patients or residents.

    And at every turn, you will have the choice of accepting the second-hand views and tired old standards of others or strengthening your resolve to offer excellent care to those who have earned far more respect and compassion than they are given these days.

    Follow your heart. The world will be a better place because of people like you.




    Be good, and you will be lonesome.

    --- Mark Twain, Following the Equator



    Be lonesome, and you will be free.

    --- Jimmy Buffett, That's What Livin' Is To Me
    Last edit by southlandshari on May 5, '08
  7. 0
    I recently asked my nurse manager, "Why does our facility dislike older nurses?"

    Her response: "Older nurses are difficult to deal with. They're stuck in their ways, and are always too busy arguing. Newer nurses are easier for us to work with."

    Ironically, my nurse manager is over the age of 40.

    Does age discrimination exist in the nursing workforce? Yes, it certainly does! And it is the totally incorrect thing to do.
  8. 0
    Whoa I Must Work In The Same Place You Do Its All Sounds So Familar But All Of My Don Adon Owner Are All Kin Try Working In These Conditions And Most Of The Office Staff Are Kin. When I First Started Working There Somebody Told Me Watch What You Say And They Were Right. But I Stay Because I Love My Residents
  9. 1
    LOL. I have to laugh about older nurses int LTC. I have worked in several areas here and find that your strongest nurses in the "off shifts" are older nurses. We have no younger children at home and our spouses (if we have one) are very agreeable to our shifts. We have experience and can problem solve in a heartbeat. We are the most outspoken when it is important to us for the pts. But, we also know the politics of the place and know when to let it go LOL. We can't change our work place, but we do change the way our pts. see us.
    psalm likes this.


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