LPNs Often Fare Better Than Some Degree Earners - page 9

by TheCommuter 18,345 Views | 88 Comments Senior Moderator

Some readers might be aware that a college bubble is forming in the United States. Since so many people in this day and age have earned college degrees when compared to previous generations, the value of having one has decreased... Read More


  1. 1
    Quote from vintagemother
    Dang commuter! You say some great stuff at the right time!! I start lvn school on Monday and hope for the things you mentioned!!! Thanks!!
    I checked your profile and see that you are located in Northern CA, which (unfortunately) has one of the worst nursing job markets in the entire country due to the economic slump.

    I'm only being realistic when I say that you are going to need to be ultra creative, think outside the box, and network like crazy in order to find LVN employment in that part of the state. Things are so saturated in Northern CA that some LVN graduates from the class of 2009, 2010, and 2011 have not found their first nursing jobs yet.
    HazelLPN likes this.
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    I have my history degree. and definately agree, Lpns make MORE MONEY. I am a proud carrier of a bachelors in History that doesn't pay the bills. My Lpn license pays the bills. I will never regret getting that bachelors(army paid for that anyways!) NEVER. But am forever grateful I have nursing skills that NOONE can take away from me. And it is nice to be able to pay my rent on time!

    One of my friends has her masters in 15th century French art...

    She sells jewelry at a local store for $7.50/hr.

    Exactly what kind of high paying job she thought she would get with that degree is beyond me.

    Once she said to me, "You are just an LPN! Why do you get paid so much? I have my masters!!"

    Uh, yeah,

    An Rn with her masters..yes someone like that SHOULD and does get paid more. Completely understandable.

    An art history major in an esoteric subject? Of course I am going to get paid more. Supply and demand. Supply and demand.

    She has applied to numerous museums...but I am sure there are plenty of art history applicants behind her. I am not an expert but I am going to assume that there are very few positions in comparison to all the art history majors applying.

    But if I have question about 15th century French art, I shall ask my friend!
    Last edit by historylovinglpn on Oct 28, '12
    BrandonLPN likes this.
  3. 1
    Great article and right on time. I just finished my packet in hopes of getting into practical nursing school. I initially went to college immediately after high school because that was what my parents wanted. I didn't fill out one college app. My parents did them. I tried going into the military but my father cried and pitched a real fit about it. If I had it to do over though I would have either started LPN school right out of high school or went for the military. I dated a guy with 3 degrees and he has no work experience whatsoever. Needless to say he has a really hard time finding work anywhere. I recommended he complete his paralegal studies and work part time while in school but he feels that is "beneathe him" as a law student. Like someone else said, people need to start looking at education as more than just a trophy and a means to look down on those who have chosen different paths. Are we not all in this world togther? Degrees, diplomas, and certificates are stepping stones to a better life. However, the piece of paper in and of itself is not enough anymore. Experience is priceless and will definitely score you a second look too. I plan to use the prereqs I completed in the beginning of my college career later to get my BSN but I definitely think I am much wiser regarding how I want to continue my educational pursuits and avoid drowning in college debt. Thank you again for the article!
    prettymica likes this.
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    Yikes, a *masters* in 15th century French art?? I'm sorry, but the fact that such a major even exists show how out of touch academia is with the real world...
    LTCNS, Tflowers34907, brillohead, and 1 other like this.
  5. 0
    I have a BA in Political Science. I am thankful to have the degree but so far it has done nothing for me. I was not able to get a job with my degree. I finally went to LPN school for 1 year and then I was able to find a job making nearly $20/hour. I am currently in a LPN-BSN program. My point is just having a bachelors degree is not always going to land you a job. Sometimes you have to change your perspective and explore other options that you may have shot down in the past. When you open your mind up to other options you might just stumble into the path you should have taken in the first place.
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    Definately agree! I live in a university neighborhood and I had to cringe when I heard someone talking about getting his degree in the classics. I am all for doing something you love..but sometimes doing something you love doesn't pay the bills.
  7. 0
    Quote from Tflowers34907
    I tried going into the military but my father cried and pitched a real fit about it. If I had it to do over though I would have either started LPN school right out of high school or went for the military.
    I considered joining the military immediately after high school, but my overly controlling parents discouraged me from doing so.

    I am now 31 years old. I sometimes think back and realize that, if I had joined the U.S. Army at age 18, I could be retiring in seven short years (age 38). However, as a nurse I will probably need to work for the next 30+ years before retiring unless I manage to obtain a job with a city, county, state, or federal government.

    Of course, there's always the possibility that I could have been killed or maimed in Iraq or Afghanistan if I had joined the military.
  8. 4
    I graduated from an LPN diploma program in 1999. Worked in the IMCU for a year, then went agency. I have worked as an LPN in hospitals, nursing homes, assisted livings, home healths, etc. I have gained more experience working as an LPN than I ever could have in RN school. I still think about going back to school every now and then but I work as the MDS and EHR Coordinator at my current job and have an RN working for me. I am 3rd in charge, after the DON and ADON, and am the "goto" person for most issues that arise in most departments. Over the years my salary has increased steadily and I currently make more money than most RN's I know. If you love what you do and are willing to learn, experience will get you everywhere!
    Red35, LTCNS, BrandonLPN, and 1 other like this.
  9. 0
    Quote from TheCommuter
    I considered joining the military immediately after high school, but my overly controlling parents discouraged me from doing so.

    I am now 31 years old. I sometimes think back and realize that, if I had joined the U.S. Army at age 18, I could be retiring in seven short years (age 38). However, as a nurse I will probably need to work for the next 30+ years before retiring unless I manage to obtain a job with a city, county, state, or federal government.

    Of course, there's always the possibility that I could have been killed or maimed in Iraq or Afghanistan if I had joined the military.
    Wow, retrospect is always 20/20. 30+ years to retire vs in about 7? That could be depressing if thought about too long. You are still young though. Are you actively persuing employment with a city, county, state, or gov't facility? I have not yet given up on joining the military. I am strongly considering joining the Nurse Corps once I get my BSN (as long as I accomplish that before age 42). Granted I will likely be in my 30s but I think it will give me a much more secure life in the long run.


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