LPNs Often Fare Better Than Some Degree Earners - pg.6 | allnurses

LPNs Often Fare Better Than Some Degree Earners - page 6

Some readers might be aware that a college bubble is forming in the United States. Since so many people in this day and age have earned college degrees when compared to previous generations, the... Read More

  1. Visit  whatdoIdonow? profile page
    3
    I went all the way through to RN at a tech school Wish I had gotten my LPN after the first year so I could work parttime and learn the basic skills. So, now that I am out working, I am in LTC doing the LPN job because that is the extent of our patient acuity. The local hospitals wouldn't touch me without one years experience or a BSN or both. I am well paid at my facility, which is nice. It's even better than the average around here. But, I can see that if I did not have my RN (and will be starting my BSN in the fall next year) I would feel stuck at the LPN level. I want to be open to do so much more than the routine that goes in LTC.

    More education is never a mistake. Education is an investment in your future. You never know where that road will take you. Because I earned my BA in my twenties, I was able to be accepted immediately in my program without having to take the pre-nursing prereqs and then apply (that would have made the waiting list about two years longer). Because I have my BA, I was able to transfer those credits to my BSN program so I again have only a few courses to take before the fall of next year. Because I have my BA, I was legally allowed to home educate my children in states that require the parent to have a BA to teach high school at home. Because my husband has his BA (in classics from UF) he was able to be in management in his industry (something his brother could not do with the same company because he didn't finish his degree).


    Some majors in college may seem fluffy, but it's all about the individual and their resourcefulness once they earn that degree. Higher education is an investment in your future. You may not see an immediate monetary return (like with a tech degree) but it will open many doors in the future and prevent there being a ceiling being placed on future advancement because of the lack of a degree. It show committment to employers. It show that you can do quality course work.

    Does college need to cost as much as it does today? No.

    If someone didn't have the funds to go after high school, I would suggest a tech degree so they could start working. Then take classes as an adult professional in the evenings. Eventually, they will have that bachelors. There is more than one way to skin a cat!

    I would never advise someone to skip the college degree because they are making good money today. That is a short sighted view of the future. Degree earners fare better in their overall lifetime earnings than those who don't have degrees, studies have proven.


    The general tone of this whole thread seems to me like the tone of reverse racism- LPN's striking back at those with college degrees, declaring themselves smarter and better while waving their checkbooks in the air to prove it.


    Again, the measure of the worth of someone's education is not based on the size of their paycheck. Are teachers worthless, social workers? Many fields produce lower incomes in the real world. That doesn't make the field less needed or worth pursuing.
    lovedijah, prettymica, and kablammo like this.
  2. Visit  brillohead profile page
    7
    This editorial cartoon was in my newspaper today....

    itsmejuli, TheCommuter, Fiona59, and 4 others like this.
  3. Visit  Stephalump profile page
    6
    Quote from brillohead
    This editorial cartoon was in my newspaper today....
    Hah! My husband is a welder/machinist and he makes a better salary than I will out of nursing school, for sure. He received on the job training, so he has absolutely no debt and is moving up the ranks into management far more quickly than I could ever hope to!

    My little brother, however, just graduated from college with his business degree and landed a respectably entry level job, but it drives him up the wall that my "uneducated" husband with a blue collar career makes more than him. It drives him absolutely nuts.

    He can make all the snotty comments about manual labor he wants - we'll be laughing all the way to the bank. And the reality is, my husband would waste away sitting in an office at the computer all day, so not only is he paid well, but he's happy.
    Fiona59, prettymica, brillohead, and 3 others like this.
  4. Visit  rayshettabrown profile page
    0
    Kudos!!
  5. Visit  brillohead profile page
    3
    Quote from Stephalump
    My little brother, however, just graduated from college with his business degree and landed a respectably entry level job, but it drives him up the wall that my "uneducated" husband with a blue collar career makes more than him. It drives him absolutely nuts.
    My niece will graduate with her BSN around the same time I graduate with my ADN. She'll have spent over $100K and I'll have only spent ~$10K, maybe less. We'll make the same wage. Granted, she'll have the opportunity to get into management at some point if she wants to, but I'm in my 40s now and my goal is to get OUT of mgmt, so I don't see the point in spending six figures on something that I don't want to use.


    Quote from Stephalump
    He can make all the snotty comments about manual labor he wants - we'll be laughing all the way to the bank. And the reality is, my husband would waste away sitting in an office at the computer all day, so not only is he paid well, but he's happy.
    That's the thing... everyone should be able to do something they enjoy, or at the very least do something that they don't detest. The world will always need plumbers and carpenters and car mechanics and all that jazz, and all of those trades earn very healthy wages. Why would anyone think that they have the right to look down on someone who is making a living at something legal and paying their own way in the world?
    Fiona59, rayshettabrown, and prettymica like this.
  6. Visit  whatdoIdonow? profile page
    0
    A very real and unfortunate drawback to some technical fields is that it requires manual labor. My friend's husband, the plumber, can no longer continue in his trade now that he's in his forties because his knees are shot from all the crouching in tight places. The money may be good, but it's hard on the body! Something to consider when going to a trade in your twenties...what shape can you expect to be in by middle age from all the strain on the body.
  7. Visit  BrandonLPN profile page
    1
    Actually, I think manual labor keeps people in good shape. Moving furniture helped build my muscles. It's many office/computer workers who seem pretty flabby and weak to me.
    Fiona59 likes this.
  8. Visit  TheCommuter profile page
    1
    Quote from whatdoIdonow?
    Something to consider when going to a trade in your twenties...what shape can you expect to be in by middle age from all the strain on the body.
    The same can be said for bedside nursing being hard on one's body due to its very physical nature. Many nurses who enter this profession during their youth end up entering middle age with chronic back problems, stress on the joints, repetitive motion injuries, rotator cuff issues, and so forth.

    Our very own Nursing With Disabilities forum is filled with these nurses who are now worn down after practicing at the bedside for decades.

    To some, the logical solution would be, "Earn your BSN or MSN and look for a desk job." However, many of these nurses already have nursing education at the baccalaureate (BSN) level, and the number of less physical 'desk jobs' is finitely limited. There can only be so many chiefs to overlook the Indians.
    rayshettabrown likes this.
  9. Visit  lovedijah profile page
    0
    I dont regret my 18,000 BS in Sociology. I was able, and still remain able to find employment- that I don't think I could find without a degree. Sure, I rarely ever see jobs that require degrees in Sociology. But the point is to have a degree. In anything. And people will give you a second look. I'd rather have a Bachelors, than not have one. I also think "going away to college" is an experience that I wouldn't have got, had I just gone to LPN school from the start. I lived on my own, balanced a checkbook, learned things about myself and other people. Sounds corny, but it was worth 18,000- to me. Yet, I still have to pay $200 a month for 8 more years for my "experience". So yeah, there are drawbacks.

    That said, I'm excited to see what my future as a LPN holds for me. I don't think I would have ended up here, if not for my oppurtunity to work in a group home and see what nurses did.
  10. Visit  Stephalump profile page
    1
    Quote from whatdoIdonow?
    A very real and unfortunate drawback to some technical fields is that it requires manual labor. My friend's husband, the plumber, can no longer continue in his trade now that he's in his forties because his knees are shot from all the crouching in tight places. The money may be good, but it's hard on the body! Something to consider when going to a trade in your twenties...what shape can you expect to be in by middle age from all the strain on the body.
    I agree with this. My step father has been a welder for 30 years and his body is wearing out. Fortunately, he owns his own business so he was able to hire in someone to do it for him. Many good paying manual labor careers have paths that lead to less physical work. A good friend of mine spent about 10 years doing commercial hazmat clean up and moved up into a 6 figure office job with the company with nothing more than a good head on his shoulders and networking.

    My mother, an RN is not longer practicing thanks to the strain on HER body at 53. A few years ago she injured her back and had to have surgery and can't work bedside any more. So I wouldn't exclude nursing from the "manual labor" category.
    brillohead likes this.
  11. Visit  whatdoIdonow? profile page
    0
    Quote from TheCommuter
    The same can be said for bedside nursing being hard on one's body due to its very physical nature. Many nurses who enter this profession during their youth end up entering middle age with chronic back problems, stress on the joints, repetitive motion injuries, rotator cuff issues, and so forth.

    Our very own Nursing With Disabilities forum is filled with these nurses who are now worn down after practicing at the bedside for decades.

    To some, the logical solution would be, "Earn your BSN or MSN and look for a desk job." However, many of these nurses already have nursing education at the baccalaureate (BSN) level, and the number of less physical 'desk jobs' is finitely limited. There can only be so many chiefs to overlook the Indians.

    I definitely agree! And, I also consider nursing a skilled trade as well.
  12. Visit  whatdoIdonow? profile page
    0
    Quote from BrandonLPN
    Actually, I think manual labor keeps people in good shape. Moving furniture helped build my muscles. It's many office/computer workers who seem pretty flabby and weak to me.
    With good body mechanics, I suppose lifting furniture would produce body building effects. I'm thinking more of the trades that require you to twist your body out of shape to fit in tight places (like plumbing etc). Good paying trades while young that take a toll on the body with the years. These trades aren't really aerobic or body building...and many in these professions are just as flabby as your average office worker who sits at a desk. Besides, lifting furniture isn't a trained technical degree in my neck of the woods.
  13. Visit  shamrokks profile page
    2
    This is inspiring and we need more inspiration as LPNs. Too many people bash us and I'm tired of it. I would never dare look down upon someone due to their occupation/career. As an LPN I've never had so many people treat me like I'm a nobody. Truth be told this is the best position I've ever had in my life. Yes I am going for my RN. Do I feel that makes me less of a nurse as a LPN, no. I may not have the same scope of practice but it's almost like comparing a doctor to a surgeon in my opinion.

    As a LPN I do not live paycheck to paycheck. I have 2 savings accounts (when I never even had one before). I have a brand new car, a huge apartment, I have 2 children who have everything they need and want, I spoil myself with things that I could not before. Point being- My family does just fine on my income as a LPN.


    To reiterate the point of this post even more is the fact that one HUGE reason I'm going on to do the LPN to RN bridge is because I've already spent so much time and money on all of the pre requisites needed for the program. If I don't finish then I will have those loans to pay back with nothing to show for it.
    prettymica and DogWmn like this.


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