LPNs: Myths And Misconceptions (Part IV) - pg.2 | allnurses

LPNs: Myths And Misconceptions (Part IV) - page 2

Licensed practical nurses (LPNs) have made significant contributions to the nursing profession in several different countries for many years. However, a multitude of myths and misconceptions exist... Read More

  1. Visit  withasmilelpn profile page
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    What I meant was after graduating, education is spent more at facilities I've worked at for the RNs. I believe that although it would be a financial burden for some, CEUs should be a required part of maintaining your LPN license. The school I went to had a lengthier program then many states require for LPN schools and our clinicals definitely compared to an AD program.

    I didn't find the MD'a article to be an overly derogatory one. I think it had some good suggestions worth examining.
  2. Visit  tothepointeLVN profile page
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    CEU's ARE are a required part of maintaing my LVN license at least in my state and I assumed all.
  3. Visit  withasmilelpn profile page
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    Quote from tothepointeLVN
    CEU's ARE are a required part of maintaing my LVN license at least in my state and I assumed all.
    Nope. There is a wide disparity between states.
  4. Visit  TheCommuter profile page
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    Quote from tothepointeLVN
    CEU's ARE are a required part of maintaing my LVN license at least in my state and I assumed all.
    I've been licensed as an LPN in Oklahoma, which required absolutely no CEUs upon renewal. Some states do not have any CEU requirement.

    On the other hand, I've been licensed as an LVN in CA and TX. CA required 30 CEUs upon renewal and Texas requires 20 CEUs prior to each renewal of licensure.
  5. Visit  tothepointeLVN profile page
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    Well so goes California so goes the nation (so they say). You really should have to prove you've made some effort to stay current to keep your licence current.
  6. Visit  TheCommuter profile page
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    Click on the link below to scroll through the different CEU requirements set by each state's board of nursing. A staggering number of states have no CEU requirements.

    http://www.pearlsreview.com/requirements.html
  7. Visit  tothepointeLVN profile page
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    UGH just another card they have against us. Though glancing through that link it does look like a lot of the states that don't require CE's from LPN don't need them from RN's either so at least thats some what equal.
  8. Visit  DoGoodThenGo profile page
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    Nosing around NYS's website came upon this:

    http://www.op.nysed.gov/prof/nurse/d...stage-care.pdf

    Just a bit more information, do with it what you will.
  9. Visit  tothepointeLVN profile page
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    Quote from DoGoodThenGo
    Nosing around NYS's website came upon this:

    http://www.op.nysed.gov/prof/nurse/d...stage-care.pdf

    Just a bit more information, do with it what you will.
    I do believe for a brief period of time LVN's were allowed to IV push certain medications in a dialysis center but CNA or one of the pro RN lobbying bodies got that struck down.

    Though realistically they do need to be able to find a way to provide good dialysis care at an affordable price.
  10. Visit  TheCommuter profile page
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    Quote from tothepointeLVN
    Though realistically they do need to be able to find a way to provide good dialysis care at an affordable price.
    Yes, especially with all of the Medicare and Medicaid cutbacks. In the future, I suspect that freestanding dialysis centers are going to find ways to operate with less RNs and more dialysis technicians and LPNs. After all, these facilities are already being pinched to the max.
    nursel56 and tothepointeLVN like this.
  11. Visit  tothepointeLVN profile page
    2
    Absolutely and with Type II diabetes becoming more common we are going to start seeing more and more patients on dialysis so price wise somethings got to give. Might as well transfer some responsibilities to the LVN than to expand the dialysis technicians role.

    Economics are going to have more of an influence on the LVN/LPN role than any nursing union or public opinion. LPN's haven't been completely phased out and are dominant in certain areas like LTC and home health.

    Personally I would like to see the LVN role/education to be expanded to fit the niche the transition away from ADN to BSN have left. Expand the length and content of the education required but keep the accessibility the same. Meaning have the core disciplines such as A+P integrated into the program so there isn't that 1 year prereq bottleneck before application. I feel we lose a lot of good nurses that way because the barrier to entry is so high
    tazmom and nursel56 like this.
  12. Visit  DoGoodThenGo profile page
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    Quote from tothepointeLVN
    Absolutely and with Type II diabetes becoming more common we are going to start seeing more and more patients on dialysis so price wise somethings got to give. Might as well transfer some responsibilities to the LVN than to expand the dialysis technicians role.

    Economics are going to have more of an influence on the LVN/LPN role than any nursing union or public opinion. LPN's haven't been completely phased out and are dominant in certain areas like LTC and home health.

    Personally I would like to see the LVN role/education to be expanded to fit the niche the transition away from ADN to BSN have left. Expand the length and content of the education required but keep the accessibility the same. Meaning have the core disciplines such as A+P integrated into the program so there isn't that 1 year prereq bottleneck before application. I feel we lose a lot of good nurses that way because the barrier to entry is so high
    How long have I been saying that?

    States should take a page from Canada. When the move was made to make the RN require a BSN for entry the LPNs have a two year degree and their own sphere of practice.

    Take your standard LPN program and raise the bar to an associate degree. Add some good sciences and others courses to provide a firm foundation for bedside and "technical" care.
  13. Visit  tothepointeLVN profile page
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    It's the best solution the only thing I'm concerned about is accessibility. Integrate those science courses in. Don't make it like RN programs where you have to take 2 years to jump over hoops just to get a chance to start.

    I remember when I live in NZ and was looking at studying design they had a program which was typical of certain education programs. You do the first year you got a certificate, you do the second year you got a diploma, you go the third year you got your bachelors degree. Also make home the CNA/PCT role requires a one year certificate. Qualification Overview


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