Are LPN's being phased out?

  1. 0
    I know people have been saying for years that everyone would need a BSN and LPN's would be a thing of the past, etc. Well, so far, where I work (a large, magnet hospital) there are still many, many nurses without a BSN -but there are veeery few LPN's. I attended a meeting last week where my supervisor was lecturing RNs about signing off on LPN's charts and she mentioned that there are very few LPN's and even mentioned that some of those LPN's are about to graduate to be RN's. I overheard other RNs in the cafeteria complaining about LPN's basically saying, "what's the point when we have to go behind them."

    They are definitely being phased out where I work. They aren't hiring LPN's anymore although the ones who are there aren't getting fired or anything. What is it like where you work? Do you think LPN's have a future?
  2. 232 Comments so far...

  3. 0
    I work in a LTAC/SNF and there is an even mix of LPNs and RNs, the only difference is the LPN's "gather data" and RN's assess, and a few others, such they have to have a RN sign off on the inital skin assessments.
    The hospital just up the road from my facility just posted positions for LPNs in the ED, and other hospital in my area has about 20 LPN postings.
    So may be the area, now jobs for new grads LPN or RN in my area are almost none
  4. 28
    LPNs being phased out? It will not happen anytime soon.

    This pervasive rumor has been circulating since the American Nurses Association first proposed the BSN as the minimum entry point for all new nurses back in 1965. They also discussed the elimination of the LPN role, and the incorporation of associates-degree RNs as 'technical' nurses.

    46 years has elapsed since the ANA made the proposal, and the LPN is still in healthcare. Just because you see less of them in some acute care hospitals doesn't mean that they're being phased out. LPNs are the backbone of nursing homes, home health, and hospice. They can also be found in psychiatric hospitals, rehab facilities, group homes, clinics, doctors offices, and other settings outside the hospital.
    MimiLPN, Nursebetie, NurseBowlin, and 25 others like this.
  5. 1
    well, you say "outside the hospital."

    there used to be (and probably still is) an abundance of LPN's in the hospitals. but as i said - where i work (a hospital) they are no longer HIRING LPN's. it's more than talk.

    don't you think if the hospitals are no longer hiring LPN's that will trickle down to LTC, etc? there's been talk for a long time with no action (just like with the BSN - which i mentioned) but with LPN's i'm actually seeing it happen.
    Julie19 likes this.
  6. 1
    Quote from TheCommuter
    LPNs being phased out? It will not happen anytime soon.

    This pervasive rumor has been circulating since the American Nurses Association first proposed the BSN as the minimum entry point for all new nurses back in 1965. They also discussed the elimination of the LPN role, and the incorporation of associates-degree RNs as 'technical' nurses.

    46 years has elapsed since the ANA made the proposal, and the LPN is still in healthcare. Just because you see less of them in some acute care hospitals doesn't mean that they're being phased out. LPNs are the backbone of nursing homes, home health, and hospice. They can also be found in psychiatric hospitals, rehab facilities, group homes, clinics, doctors offices, and other settings outside the hospital.
    Just because something hasn't happened, doesn't mean it won't. With the ever expanding group of unemployed or underemployed RNs on the bread line you can expect the last bastions of LPNs you mentioned to be employing RNs. I work in one of the aforementioned places as a new grad BSN...one of the hiring managers told me point blank "why hire an LPN when I can hire an RN"
    blueyedarmynurse likes this.
  7. 2
    Quote from SunSurfRN
    Just because something hasn't happened, doesn't mean it won't. With the ever expanding group of unemployed or underemployed RNs on the bread line you can expect the last bastions of LPNs you mentioned to be employing RNs. I work in one of the aforementioned places as a new grad BSN...one of the hiring managers told me point blank "why hire an LPN when I can hire an RN"
    this is exactly the attitude i've seen lately. with RNs working short staffed, they are tired of "babysitting" the LPN's so to speak. at one time, there were enough RNs on the floor that it wasn't such a big deal for them to "cover" the LPNs, but now - they're lucky to get their "own job" finished without having to go behind a LPN. i've even seen brand new grads be charge nurses over LPNs who have years of experience. it just makes no logical or financial sense.
    tabhow52 and anotherone like this.
  8. 1
    Here in central Fl, hospitals are not hiring LPN's and if they do its more on the business side. They want all BSN nurses due to wanting to go Magnet status. Trust me every other wk at wk my managers are on me to get my RN!!!
    sweetrose407 likes this.
  9. 17
    Quote from JSlovex2
    don't you think if the hospitals are no longer hiring LPN's that will trickle down to LTC, etc?
    Medicaid is the largest payor source for LTC facilities. Since the average nursing home resident is only going to generate $100 per day in reimbursement from Medicaid, nursing homes cannot operate on an all-RN staff unless they pay the RNs crappy wages (and some places do).

    The very low Medicaid reimbursement rates are the reason why LTC nurses tend to have 30+ residents. The reimbursement issue is also why LPNs are the backbone of LTC facilities in most places across the U.S. LPNs are usually the lower-paid nurse. To be blunt, an LTC resident is not as profitable as a hospital patient, since the hospital stay might exceed $100,000 easily during the course of a few days.
    DogWmn, mummeesgoin2skool, kbrn2002, and 14 others like this.
  10. 12
    I am currently going to school to become a LPN in michigan, due to the long wait times, for RN schools. Of which I am on several waiting lists. Alot students are going this route, so that they can get advance placement into RN programs. Through the LPN-ADN or LPN-BSN programs.

    Let me say I been a NA at Henry Ford Hospital for less than 2 years and I find that many hospitals are hiring LPN's in there home health departments, and hospice. All the hopsitals in Michigan are bringing in EMT's and LPN's into their emergency rooms instead of ULP (like NA's).

    Many hospitals also are using LPN's in their Dialylsis departments. There are an abundance of opportunities to LPN in the nursing homes, due to the increase in the Baby Boomers retiring. Many RN's don't think they are good enough to work in nursing homes, and many nursing homes, can't afford to have an all RN staff.

    My mom was in Healthcare industry for 30 years and told me every since the 60's they have been saying LPN's will be phased out. Yet, here we are with LPN's still being needed and viable in Health Care. Yes! Many hospitals are not hiring them as floor nurses, but there are other opportunities for them. Not to mention, training schools that need LPN's to train PCT's, NA's and Medical Assistants. I have already been offered a Job when I am done to teach PCT's.

    Please also note, that all hospitals in michigan hire ADN RN's you only need a BSN to be in managment.
    There has been 40 nurses hired on the floor I work on in the last years in a half. All but 3 have been ADN RN's.

    Not to mention many new LPN's in nursing homes make more money than new RN's starting as floor nurses in hospitals.

    So all I can say is don't be discouraged, I have found on my floor many of the nurses were LPN's first. They tend to make more better nurses, who don't think it to little to do what ever is neccessary for the patient.

    Also, I was told by my nurse educator who was a LPN first, that being a LPN first makes RN school alot easier as well.

    Once I have completed my LPN certificate, that fall I will start my RN's classes and be done in half the time, then I would have been going the traditional method.
  11. 23
    Sounds like yet another insulting, flaming post. Your reasoning is baseless, one hospital out of how many? LPN/LVN's ARE NOT BEING PHASED OUT! Go find some other fairytale rumor. I do high tech pediatric homecare, guess what? They do not want RN's to do my cases, because LPN's are just as capable and the rate per hour is less. Your hospital may not hire LPN's, it doesn't mean we are being wiped off the face of the earth. Please do valid research before stating things that you perceive to be true.


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