Are LPN's being phased out? - page 7

I know people have been saying for years that everyone would need a BSN and LPN's would be a thing of the past, etc. Well, so far, where I work (a large, magnet hospital) there are still many, many nurses without a BSN -but there... Read More

  1. 1
    Quote from DonaldJ
    . . .I did not mention anything about going outside of scope of practice. Not sure where anyone would even get that from, but it sounds a little passive-aggressive to imply that anyone in this thread suggested going outside of their scope.
    I think some people confuse scope of practice with hospital policies. Wherever the OP is an intern - they seem to have quite a bit more friction than the average between LPNs and RNs since their complaints are so often the main topic of conversation.

    The only thing I can say for sure is that however things shake out, phasing in and out will be based on budget concerns and nothing more lofty or esoteric than that.

    The "new model" of having just RNs and CNAs could really mean not very many RNs and lots of CNAs with "certificates" to pass oral meds or whatever task they can delegate to the CNAs. There are already a large number of new tech categories compared to 10 years ago and I suppose it will continue to trend. RNs will supervise and do lots of paperwork/charting/phone calling/troubleshooting.
    Last edit by nursel56 on Apr 25, '11
    netglow likes this.

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  2. 0
    [quote=DonaldJ;5038445]We can agree to disagree. I went to LPN school for one year, but it was 40 hours a week for a year with only a few weeks' break inbetween. Compared to an ADN program that's 12-16 hours a week for 4 semesters or a BSN that's 8 semesters (only 4 of which are nursing-specific). In my RN studies, I didn't feel that I learned much more than I did in LPN school. Maybe nominally more in-depth, but very little. Maybe that's more of a testament to the efficacy of my LPN school than anything else.

    The responsibility is higher for an RN. There's no question about that. But, in many areas, the job is exactly the same. Sorry if that hurts some feelings, but it's the truth. It's not true in ALL areas, but it is true for many areas. It's going to be a totally different story in ICU and Oncology where you have a lot of chemo going on or are having to hang a lot of blood, assist with sedation, etc.

    This is also going to vary from state to state due to scope of practice, but it's the same for RN's. In one state that I work in, I can get EJ access without a physician order. In another, I can't even attempt an EJ *with* a physician order. Just one small example.

    Guess it depends where you are, my feelings arent hurt because Im not taking it personal and my opinions arent going to change. We live two different lives. I went to an excellent LPN program and learned so much BUT I think the level of what I learned in RN school was different. I have been on both sides. But one thing I learned is you get paid based on your level of responsibility, thats every career. This is in left field because this has nothing to do with the phasing out of LPNs. IMO thats not going to happen, maybe hospitals will make the decision to do that. In an earlier post I said if you want quality care the hospitals should employ LPNs and RNs on acute floors, instead of RNs and CNAs. When I was a LPN at the VA Hospital this is what they did and it was great. If you have a great charge nurse, she knows how to assign patients properly where the LPN would get the more stable patients and things that would be out of your scope of practice (hospital policy and based on BON) would less likely be needed (so you dont have to worry about RNs complaining, which annoyed me as a LPN, I didnt want to ask for anything sometimes because of this). Hospital policy and scope of practice are different, but as a LPN I know many of us practiced outside of our scope. If you go to your BON and see what LPN can do within her license there is a difference. But this argument can go on forever. Ive worked quite a few places, thanks to the military and I can only say what Ive seen based on my experience. We are all going to have different experiences and perspectives, so whats the point of debating? So I agree to disagree, because people will always think LPNs and RNs do the SAME job for LESS pay, I use to think that too - but now I dont (thats just my opinion), it doesnt mean I dont think we all contribute in a different way. I can think of a few members of healthcare team that can be phased out, and LPNS arent one of them.
  3. 0
    Quote from MekBlizz
    . . . Hospital policy and scope of practice are different, but as a LPN I know many of us practiced outside of our scope. If you go to your BON and see what LPN can do within her license there is a difference. But this argument can go on forever. .
    I'm wondering what your facility was asking you to do that was out of your scope - because if it was "many" LPNs it sounds as though it would be a systemic problem as well as very high risk for them legally! There is no way I would allow that to happen even if my scope of practice was limited to filling water pitchers - my clear license is too important to my life to risk it in the way your facility seems to have done -- thanks in advance . .
  4. 0
    Quote from nursel56
    I'm wondering what your facility was asking you to do that was out of your scope - because if it was "many" LPNs it sounds as though it would be a systemic problem as well as very high risk for them legally! There is no way I would allow that to happen even if my scope of practice was limited to filling water pitchers - my clear license is too important to my life to risk it in the way your facility seems to have done -- thanks in advance . .
    I wasnt speaking in relation to my facility, I was saying in general. I will be honest and say, I have a bad habit of saying "many" when I should say "some" - I need to practice proofreading, LoL!
  5. 1
    Quote from MekBlizz
    I wasnt speaking in relation to my facility, I was saying in general. I will be honest and say, I have a bad habit of saying "many" when I should say "some" - I need to practice proofreading, LoL!
    Me too - ability to edit after five minutes a huge plus for Premium Membership and I've got lots of "updated" posts which translates as "oops another typo or word clarifier"! !
    Mrs. SnowStormRN likes this.
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    Hello,

    I am in GA and where i work they stated in April 2010 that they were not hiring any more LPN's and they suggest we get an RN, preferably a BSN...........Sept 2010 CNO (chief nurse officer) stated that 1) if you are and ADN and hold a management position she is suggesting that you go for you BSN or you won't have the position. 2) also states as of 2012/2013 there won't be ADN in hospitals only BSN....not sure how accurate this is or where she obtained her info.

    My friend in NC has a coworker that just obtained her ADN, went to apply at hospitals to work and was told they want a BSN.
  7. 0
    I graduated Dec 2010 LPN. No job for me, every time I apply " at least one year"
    it is so sad.... I pay 14,0000 the second person passes N-CLEX for what for nothing...............
  8. 0
    In British Columbia RNs are being replaced in nursing homes by LPNs these days. There is one RN on each shift in a supervisory capacity but the LPNs do the meds and oversee the residents care. This is a new movement in the last year, which has left many RNs scrambling for jobs. The new LPNs are finding it almost impossible to get into the hospital though, not because they are phasing LPNs out but because so many are being trained (1 year course) and there just isn't spots for them all. In this part of the world it would appear that opportunities for LPNs are expanding rather than diminishing. However if you prefer hospital nursing, your best bet is still an RN.
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    Here in South Florida is very hard to find a job at least you have a connection. My friend know a Lady who work for Mercy Hospital as soon she graduated she get the job making 20.00 just because the Lady in charge. I feel happy for her, but is very sad for others. Iam been looking I send 50 application nursing homes nothing ..... I do not know what to do anymore........... No money in my pocket........ Iam just a broke poor new graduate LPN
  10. 0
    In the two hospitals I've worked at, LPNs were definitely being phased out. However, outside of the hospital setting, I see that they still are very much employed and employable. A good friend of mine finished nursing school 3 years ago at the top of her class. Shortly after, she met someone, moved to the upper Midwest (northern MN), and found she was absolutely unemployable with a 2 year RN nursing degree and middle aged, despite having breezed through nursing school pretty much.

    What she DID find was, that the rural clinics in her area have NPs rather than MDs, and under the NPs, they have LPNs for clinic care. NO RNs. She even applied as an RN for 2 of the open LPN positions, but they said no - had to be an LPN. She eventually did find employment after a year or so of seaching in home care.

    I am also seeing LPNs still in VA long term care, home health care in my area. Hospitals though, not so much, at least where I live.


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