LPN's and PICC's

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    Does anyone know if an LPN is alloewed to become PICC certified, also while I'm asking questions how long did it take everybody to get their licenses after they graduated?
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  3. 11 Comments so far...

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    Up here is depends on the hospital and what they will allow us to do. Currently PICCs, their dressings, and all meds through them are the responsiblity of the RN. We've been told they will be ours by the end of the year. Hospital education course and it falls within our provincial scope of practice
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    In California, an IV-certified LVN may perform a dressing change on a PICC or other central line. Without the extra certification, we may not do anything with central lines.
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    Quote from SaraO'Hara
    In California, an IV-certified LVN may perform a dressing change on a PICC or other central line. Without the extra certification, we may not do anything with central lines.
    I'm pretty sure it's the same way in Indiana. And frankly, that's fine by me. I occasionally read the litigation procedings on nurses on our state's website, and came across a sad but confusing court finding: A LPN pushed crushed meds through a PICC line. The pt also had a g-tube, but how did that happen?!! Unfortunately, the pt died. I would provide a link to the info but that's been a couple of years ago, and they only keep that info up for 90 days or so. For the record, I read them to see what mistakes other nurses have made so I will be more alert to similar situations I may face. Enough rambling. Seems I'm good at that...
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    Quote from MarcyLPN
    Does anyone know if an LPN is alloewed to become PICC certified, also while I'm asking questions how long did it take everybody to get their licenses after they graduated?
    It depends upon your state's Nurse Practice Act. Where I am, LPNs may perform dressing changes, flushes, administer premixed meds, IV fluids, and a few other things via PICC line, but may not administer any IV pushes. This does not require any special certification, only that our competency has been verified.
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    Quote from MarcyLPN
    Does anyone know if an LPN is alloewed to become PICC certified, also while I'm asking questions how long did it take everybody to get their licenses after they graduated?
    PICC certification allows the nurse to insert PICC lines. If I am not mistaken, this is only allowable within the RN scope of practice after specialty training and examination approved by the intravenous nursing society (INS). PICC line care is a different matter and is governed by your state scope of practice and facility policy.

    I graduated mid-August and had my RN license approximately one month later.
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    I am IV certified and currently able to access PICC/ Central lines and do the dressing change. Also can access implanted ports. This is in PA. Can't insert them or remove them. Only an RN can do that. But can place a peripheral IV and d/c it as well. Took my course through our pharmacy.
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    Yes, I have read some interesting stories also, not too sure how and or why someone would do that... it just gets me what I find that other nurses have done...


    Quote from bluegeegoo2
    I'm pretty sure it's the same way in Indiana. And frankly, that's fine by me. I occasionally read the litigation procedings on nurses on our state's website, and came across a sad but confusing court finding: A LPN pushed crushed meds through a PICC line. The pt also had a g-tube, but how did that happen?!! Unfortunately, the pt died. I would provide a link to the info but that's been a couple of years ago, and they only keep that info up for 90 days or so. For the record, I read them to see what mistakes other nurses have made so I will be more alert to similar situations I may face. Enough rambling. Seems I'm good at that...
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    In NY, we aren't allowed to do so, to my knowledge, even with training. I knew of some that did, but I think that they are taking a risk. Even RNs can't play around with them without competency training.

    In terms of how long it takes to obtain your license, I think you need to be a bit more specific. The school is supposed to send your information to the state saying that you have successfully completed their program, and this allows you to test. They should tell you when you graduate when to send the information in. I sent mine in the very day they told us we can (about three weeks after the last day of school). Within 3 weeks, I had my ATT (Authorization To Test) and scheduled my exam 6 weeks to the letter afterwards. I took the exam on a Saturday, discovered that I passed that Monday (thanks to Quick Results) and the following Saturday, obtained my paper license in the mail. Started my position as an LPN three weeks after that. Good luck!
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    Quote from tferdaise
    Yes, I have read some interesting stories also, not too sure how and or why someone would do that... it just gets me what I find that other nurses have done...
    Yeah, I tell you...seeing what some nurses do is BEYOND my comprehension...


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