Lpn who cant find a job other than LTC - page 2

Hello fellow Lpns.I have been a Lpn here in Ct For six years and currentley at home with my small children(4) due to not bieng able to find work. There are some LTC positions open but i am so burned... Read More

  1. by   BigB
    Quote from TheCommuter
    Nursing homes would not spend the money to staff their facilities with all RNs when nursing assistants and LPNs/LVNs will suffice for much less pay. Also, most RNs would not deal with an assignment of taking care of 30 to 50 patients when they could take care of 6 to 8 patients at a hospital or 1 to 2 patients in critical care.

    I don't think nursing homes and LTC facilities will completely phase out LPNs/LVNs.
    where i work now lvn's get $23 / hr , RN's get $27/hr. Not much a difference in pay. 6 - 8 patients in acute care hospital is very tough. The nursing turnover rate is high here. Some people prefer the TLC "pace" if you will. I don't, but I a know RN's that rather have 30 - 40 patients in a nursing home, then run non-stop in an acute hospital with 6- 8.

    I think LVN's have a good chance of being phases out of any job completely, which is why many are doing the rn bridge.
    Last edit by BigB on Nov 21, '05
  2. by   TheCommuter
    Quote from BigB
    where i work now lvn's get $23 / hr , RN's get $27/hr. Not much a difference in pay.
    In acute care, many southern Californian RNs are paid $45 if they possess certification and experience. $27 is very stingy pay for an RN, in my opinion.
    Quote from BigB
    6 - 8 patients in acute care hospital is very tough.
    I'm pretty sure it is tough.
    Quote from BigB
    The nursing turnover rate is high here. Some people prefer the TLC "pace" if you will. I don't, but I a know RN's that rather have 30 - 40 patients in a nursing home, then run non-stop in an acute hospital with 6- 8.
    I suppose this preference is regional. Here in southern California, virtually no RNs do LTC if they're going to be paid less than $30 hourly. I have never seen an RN passing meds or doing treatments in a nursing home; in fact, I'll see one or two RNs doing case management and other non-bedside duties.
    Quote from BigB
    I think LVN's have a good chance of being phases out of any job completely, which is why many are doing the rn bridge.
    This might very well be true. I need to secure my future by doing the RN bridge sometime in the very near future.
  3. by   pedinurse05
    Quote from TheCommuter
    In acute care, many southern Californian RNs are paid $45 if they possess certification and experience. $27 is very stingy pay for an RN, in my opinion. I'm pretty sure it is tough.I suppose this preference is regional. Here in southern California, virtually no RNs do LTC if they're going to be paid less than $30 hourly. I have never seen an RN passing meds or doing treatments in a nursing home; in fact, I'll see one or two RNs doing case management and other non-bedside duties.This might very well be true. I need to secure my future by doing the RN bridge sometime in the very near future.
    Commuter,

    I just recently relocated to Southern California and went job hunting. I applied at several hospitals and the pay salary was pretty similar at each hospital. As an LVN of 10 years and 1 year RN, the pay was between $25-$28 base. This is with PALS, basic ECG, etc...on a critical care floor. They will also pay for any of the certifications you need. The differentials for nights was about $4.00 and weekend also $4.00. After talking to other nurses in orientation, this is pretty much the going in this area. They do add a few more dollars for more experience. I do not think $45/hr is the typical base for the staff RN. Travelers and agency maybe. The hospital I work at does hire LVN's for their rehab unit but the pay is pretty low--between $14-$17/hr. To all the LV/PN's know that there are jobs out there in homecare, hospitals (my take some searching), clinics, prisons...there are opportunities. The plus side of taking a lower paying hospital job is the tuition assistance most hospitals will give you! I was an LVN and know just how important they are!
    Missy
    Last edit by pedinurse05 on Nov 21, '05
  4. by   Nurse-Tee
    I guess my problem will be solved if i go on to get my RN also.
  5. by   mayzeegrl
    Unfortunatley this is the case where I live in Massachusetts. Seems the only job options for LPN is in LTC and as you already know as well as I, it's not a very fun setting to be in. I do know that my mother who is an LPN has had work experience as an LPN at a pediatric doctor's office, been LPN at a group home for mentally challenged, detox centers, and for a mentally ill clients at an office setting. I guess these kinds of jobs are out there, at least in MA, but they are few and far between. There's been such talk that LPNs are being phased out so I don't know if that is the case of not. I do know that not many LPNs are hired at hospitals in my area because they have techs. that do alot of what the LPNs used to do. Maybe you could check out a career center if you have one near you. Good luck in getting a job............
  6. by   TheCommuter
    Quote from pedinurse05
    I do not think $45/hr is the typical base for the staff RN. Travelers and agency maybe.
    Los Robles Hospital in Thousand Oaks, California pays experienced RNs $45 hourly. I never said that $45 was the typical base pay; however, some hospitals in southern California are willing to pay well.
  7. by   pedinurse05
    Quote from TheCommuter
    Los Robles Hospital in Thousand Oaks, California pays experienced RNs $45 hourly. I never said that $45 was the typical base pay; however, some hospitals in southern California are willing to pay well.
    From your qoute many RN's who are experienced with certifications make $45/hr in southern california...I assumed you meant the majority of hospitals. I know the rate of $27 base on average first hand from interviewing and speaking with co-workers. I do tend to agree that $27/hr is low for the area but it seems to be the rate for RN's with a year experience. I had 10 years LVN experience and many places won't take that into consideration...they say it is not professional nursing experience (even though I am doing several of the same tasks). I think they should at least consider some of this time towards experience (maybe not year for year but perhaps 2 or 3 to equal 1). This trend of not hiring LVNs in hospitals will either become more wide spread or will wear off. As many older nurses retire, we may see the hospitals hiring more LV/PN's on lower acuity floors--I hope so anyway.
    Missy
  8. by   Nurse-Tee
    Quote from mayzeegrl
    Unfortunatley this is the case where I live in Massachusetts. Seems the only job options for LPN is in LTC and as you already know as well as I, it's not a very fun setting to be in. I do know that my mother who is an LPN has had work experience as an LPN at a pediatric doctor's office, been LPN at a group home for mentally challenged, detox centers, and for a mentally ill clients at an office setting. I guess these kinds of jobs are out there, at least in MA, but they are few and far between. There's been such talk that LPNs are being phased out so I don't know if that is the case of not. I do know that not many LPNs are hired at hospitals in my area because they have techs. that do alot of what the LPNs used to do. Maybe you could check out a career center if you have one near you. Good luck in getting a job............



    I wonder if this is like this in New England area only or all over the USA? Thanks for the encouragement...
    Last edit by Nurse-Tee on Nov 21, '05
  9. by   deserr13
    I'm not sure where you are located, but here in Jacksonville, Florida LPN's work in Clinics, Dr's Offices, Home Care, Long Term Facilities and some of our hospitals. I would start making phone calls. Also, just because a hospital does not advertise the hiring of LPNs does not mean that they don't hire them. Good Luck!
  10. by   BigB
    I don't think many lvn's work in Dr's offices because the pay is really low and the dr's offices can staff medical assistants for less money. I guess home care is still an option for lvn's (the home care nursing market is BOOMing in california). What about hospice? Do they hire lvn's?

    I didn't mean lvn's would be phased out of nursing homes asap. But I think it could start happening in the next 5 years with all the "standardized nursing" talk I use to hear a lot about while doing clinicals in acute care. Standardized as in a "nurse" is someone that can do iv meds, iv pushed, etc etc. In otherwords an RN. I hope this day doesnt come as lvn are a valued member of the nursing team.
  11. by   pedinurse05
    Quote from BigB
    I don't think many lvn's work in Dr's offices because the pay is really low and the dr's offices can staff medical assistants for less money. I guess home care is still an option for lvn's (the home care nursing market is BOOMing in california). What about hospice? Do they hire lvn's?

    I didn't mean lvn's would be phased out of nursing homes asap. But I think it could start happening in the next 5 years with all the "standardized nursing" talk I use to hear a lot about while doing clinicals in acute care. Standardized as in a "nurse" is someone that can do iv meds, iv pushed, etc etc. In otherwords an RN. I hope this day doesnt come as lvn are a valued member of the nursing team.
    Unfortunately, I think you are right about the phasing out of LPN's in many areas including LTC. I think LPN's are great because I was one for a long time. Healthcare is demanding higher standards and I do think it is a good idea for "standardized nursing". In acute care it is much easier if the nurse can manage all of the patients care versus getting co-signing and needing the RN for initial assessments, blood hangs, IVP meds.....it is certainly spreading across the country--especially acute care. Sad but true.
    Missy
  12. by   mrnurse2
    Unfornately when you work in area for a long time employers assume you are a nurse who can only do the area you have been doing.
    What I have done is sometimes take a job I didn't like but then look for another job to work part time or PRN to fill in then you start getting experience in that area. Check out hospice agencies, home health agencies, registry's. A lot will say recent "acute experience" tell the interviewer or cover page on your resume that you want to fill in and are willing to learn. In California the latest thing in ER is employed to cover RN lunch relief. The other things I found is look for classroom CEU's that offer certification in a field that interest you. When you go on the interview or apply for job bring/copy your recently obtained certification. Usually facilities no matter how bad they are offer some type of documented review of performance, I ask for copies. You want performance reviews that show you are a dependable, hard worker, willing to go above and beyond.
    I started out initially in LTC that I hated, then I covered for the TX nurse on her days off. Next thing you know the vendors Hillrom, Pegasus Airwave needed a nurse consultant. I told them I really didn't have the training. They sent me to training for wound care in exchange for my services. Eventually, I accumulated a lot of experience and was being paid good. I visited facilities and put my name out and was giving the opportunity by the networking to do other things.
    Hang in there and don't give up! Nursing is a great profession, one that has always had some type of job for me especially when I needed food on the table.

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