LPN/LVN job options. (Current job is making me sick)

  1. Hi all nurses. I need advice/options on job opportunities I can take as an LVN.

    Here is my situation. I am working as a CNA in a SNF but I got my LVN license so I am looking for a LVN position now. Before working here at the SNF I was working at an ALF, I never felt sick there (I worked there for 2 years). The work there was slow paced and not stressful at all. I thought I needed a challenge but boy was I wrong. I have learned a few things about myself since working in SNF.

    I've been here in SNF for about 9 months and ever since I started, I wake up most days feeling sick, like nauseated, nervous, anxiety. It is really REALLY fast paced and really REALLY stressful. I'm STILL the last one to be done (even the new CNAs are faster than I am), I have been scolded on multiple occasions because I get so behind and forget to do vitals, most if not all of the residents require total care, they have dementia and a lot of them hit, kick, pinch, bite....

    I feel like this is not the environment I want to be in because it doesn't match my personality/the way I work. I am an INTJ type personality. I am a slow, calm, relaxed individual that likes order, I am methodical and like routine (mostly) which is the opposite of this job.
    I feel sad and disappointed because I am feeling discouraged that my only option as an LVN is SNF.

    I would like a setting where I am not rushing the whole shift to get things done, somewhere where I can take my time with tasks, not so stressful, and not getting attacked my residents.
    I would really like teaching (can LVNs do that? like in diabetes?) not a class, but more like small groups, or one on one?
    I am interested in cardiology, also school nurse sounds nice, but is that good for a first job? What other places can I look at. What are some non-traditional areas for LVNs? PLEASE give me some more options so I can go/call by the end of the week!

    *Today was one of those days where I felt sick to my stomach I wasn't even able to eat my lunch
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  2. 7 Comments

  3. by   traumaRUs
    Moved to LPN corner
  4. by   Alex Egan
    LTC is not the only options for LPNs however it is often the first job to get your first year of experience. Without that year you are less likely to be able to brake into other specialities.

    I'm an ISTJ. I Started out in LTC for three years and hated it, but it was the foundation of my skills and time magement. I work in pediatric private duty and love it, although it is boring at times. I have enjoyed camp nursing, and I did do a little teaching. I just finished a year in dialysis, it was not for me, but it helped with time magement a lot.

    There are a bunch of options...once you get some experience, and if you're willing to take lower pay (not always bit often)
  5. by   moretonel
    You're way over dramatizing this. I've read your other posts which basically ask the same question over and over. The first thing you need to do is stop overthinking this (you already knew that - you admit you overthink things). You're psyching yourself out. Calm down.

    Now before you attack me saying saying I'm not helpful, I do have a little advise. I do understand your concerns.

    I'm 6 months into my first LPN job at a LTC facility. I first was a CNA for 1.5 years at a LTC, then a Patient Care Tech at a hospital for 9 months, then I passed NCLEX-PN and got my LPN license.

    I was fortunate in that I got my job 4 months after getting my license. The valedictorian of my graduating class is still looking for her first job, and it's been a year this month since graduation.

    I work 11-7 as the only floor nurse on 1st floor (there are 2 nurses on days). After only 8 days of orientation, I was given charge of all of 1st floor residents at night. I asked myself the same questions you're asking - will I know what to do if a resident is having a heart attack, a stroke, etc. I was TERRIFIED!

    The most important piece of information I can give you to ease your mind a little (well, for you, hopefully a lot ) is that you won't be by yourself. Yes, I was the charge nurse for the entire 1st floor, but there is always the nurse supervisor. She answered any questions I had, and there were a lot. The more I did med pass, the more I did dressing changes, the more I did wound cleaning, the more I did nebulizer treatments, the more IV saline and antibiotics I hung, the more I operated the feeding pumps, the more confidence I got.

    Emergencies? I was not alone - my night nurse supervisor was there. In my first six months at my first LPN job, while waiting for EMTs to arrive (supervisor called 911) we fought to keep airway open of resident having an allergic reaction with a swollen tounge that nearly filled her mouth; while waiting for EMTs myself, the nurse supervisor, AND the 2nd floor nurse held pressure to a bleeding back head of a resident who fell; while waiting for EMTs we gave nitro every 5 minutes to a resident clenching his chest.

    I've gotten a lot faster with med pass because after repeatedly giving the same meds over and over to the same resident (and checking for new orders for that day) it becomes almost automatic.

    I'm still learning, never had a resident with a wound vac before, and I'm no where near feeling the level of pure terror my first night. Time, a willingness to learn and ask questions, experience, and finding your routine will increase your confidence, competence, and efficiency.

    The time between graduation and taking the NCLEX-PN was about 3 months. In that time I completed a 3-month EMT-Basic class and passed the National Certification. The clinical included being on the ambulance responding to 911 calls.

    The idea was to join a volunteer EMS service to keep up clinical assessment skills while looking for an LPN job. I also took the 3 day ACLS certification. It shows (on your resume) you're still actively keeping up your assessment skills (body, AVPU, DCAP-BTLS, OPQRST) and interventions (wound care, nitro for heart attack, IV fluids).

    But, by the time a was waiting to hear back from my local volunteer EMS, I was hired at my present and first LPN job.

    In my job search, before getting hired at my current employer, I also applied for medical assistant openings, and actually interviewed for 2 (obviously didn't get either of them).

    I also completed a 2-month phlebotomy certification course right after EMT course to help improve my chances during my job search for office, clinic, and ER Tech positions.

    Hope this helps. Calm your mind. Don't give up! You may not get the job in the time you want, but you will get the job.

    My wife wanted to move forward in her career, and I put out her resume. She got a few interviews but was never chosen for the positions. After about 14 months she told me to stop sending out her resume. I ignored her frustration and put out one more - that was the one that hired her. She's been with them now for 5 years and loving it.
  6. by   Rocio8809
    Hi there
    I know how you feel. Don't get discourage. There's tons of opportunity as lvns in many areas believe it or not. Sniff is not your only option. I hate it when people say that. THAT'S NOT TRUE When I graduate as an LVN I promise myself never to take a job as an LVN in a sniff due to the craziness that goes down there. I worked as an CNA before nursing school in a dementia unit. Man it was very intense and I would see that the lvns had a lot of work to do. I think you should consider becoming a school nurse. I think that fits well with your personality and type of environment you want. I work right now in a elementary school as an LVN and I loved it. There's a lot of downtime and I don't have to deal with snobby nurses or any staff members. Have you tried applying at clinics or rehab centers? EverytIme I looking on indeed there's always hiring lvns in those areas. Don't lose up hope. At least you tried it and realize it was not for you and it's good work experience that looks good in your resume.
  7. by   PrettyNerd
    Quote from moretonel
    You're way over dramatizing this. I've read your other posts which basically ask the same question over and over. The first thing you need to do is stop overthinking this (you already knew that - you admit you overthink things). You're psyching yourself out. Calm down.
    I apologize for the repetitive posts, trust me, I hate repeating myself but I did it because I felt like I wasn't getting responses, or people weren't answering my question. Sorry. But thanks for the reply/advice
  8. by   PrettyNerd
    Quote from Rocio8809
    Hi there
    I know how you feel. Don't get discourage. There's tons of opportunity as lvns in many areas believe it or not. Sniff is not your only option. I hate it when people say that. THAT'S NOT TRUE������ When I graduate as an LVN I promise myself never to take a job as an LVN in a sniff due to the craziness that goes down there. I worked as an CNA before nursing school in a dementia unit. Man it was very intense and I would see that the lvns had a lot of work to do. I think you should consider becoming a school nurse. I think that fits well with your personality and type of environment you want. I work right now in a elementary school as an LVN and I loved it. There's a lot of downtime and I don't have to deal with snobby nurses or any staff members. Have you tried applying at clinics or rehab centers? EverytIme I looking on indeed there's always hiring lvns in those areas. Don't lose up hope. At least you tried it and realize it was not for you and it's good work experience that looks good in your resume.
    Aaaw thank you so much for your kind words, encouragement, and understanding.
    I felt a little dissapointed today when the DON at work basically told me that my only option was LTC. When I asked if that was my only option, she said no but in a way she kinda said yes. She has been asking me to work there at the SNF as a nurse but I honestly don't want to, but shes been asking me a lot to just stay there.

    Yes, as of lately, I've been thinking a lot about school nursing. I just don't know what exactly it entails and if it's my first job, I'll be there by myself.

    Thank you for your reply. It made me feel better
  9. by   skeleton82
    Hi. I've been there before at nursing home for 1 year. I don't want to come back. Its very stressful job, its not for me. Right now, I'm working full time home health shift care for one on one pt with vent, trach & gt. Also, I have a per diem on the weekend hospice continuous care at pt home.

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