LPN in Dr. office???

  1. 0
    hi, i was wondering what a nurse in a dr.'s office does... an lpn not rn. is it easier than ltc or sub-acute??? please help! i have worked ltc and sub-acute for a few years now and i find it to be very difficult and burn out easy. i have been on a few interviews for dr. offices and they all ask "do u have experience in a dr. office" i say no...but i am thinking it has got to be sooo much easier i could totally do it! how am i to play up my skills and land a dr. office job? i feel as though they are forgetting or not acknowledging that ltc with 20 plus patients is not easy and that my lack of dr. office experience is besides the point b/c of that! i am also great on the computer etc. so that should not be a factor as i impart that on my resume! please help me to understand how i can play up my skills to get hired at a dr. office.heartbeat
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  3. 6 Comments so far...

  4. 1
    Lots of phone triage, vaccinations if it's peds. computer skills are great to have, vitals, and strep, urine, and flu cultures.
    rayshettabrown likes this.
  5. 2
    I worked in a Dr's office for 2 years as a fresh LPN grad. I worked for a few different docs. At this facility, each doc has a primary nurse. However, I've heard of some offices where nurses and docs kinda switch around a bit. I started out in pediatrics working for one of the busiest and meanest docs in the building. she saw about 40pts per day so it was constant go-go-go getting them in and out just to keep my head above water. I'd do vitals, vaccinations, EKG's, audio/visual screens, ear flushes, get urine samples, strep and flu swabs, etc. When the pediatrician was off, I'd work with a neurologist who had very few appts scheduled in a day because her appts were longer. All I'd do when working with her was BP, pulse, verify meds and allergies, and the occasional IV. A year later I transferred to Family Practice because I couldn't stand the pediatrician anymore and it was a little better. I had a great relationship with the doc and my duties were similar to those in the pediatric office but with the addition of screening phone calls for the doc, filling out prescription refill requests, and completing insurance prior authorizations.
    I have to say, there was literally zero triage at the facility. They'd see anyone with insurance for any reason just for the $$$- this turned into chaos sometimes because we'd get overbooked plus get walk-ins with chest pain or other ailments that should have prompted an ER visit and not a docs office visit. All the docs charted electronically, by the way.

    I think that a lot of other offices (from what I've noticed) are run more efficiently than the particular place I worked in (better triage and less overbooking). You may take a bit of a paycut going from LTC to the office, but it's definitely a quality-of-life-improvement if you like the "business hours" schedule. I've never worked LTC so I couldn't tell you whether or not it's easier, but I have the feeling it may be. No call bells, no chasing down CNAs, calling Doc's with lab values at 2am that no one bothered to address during the day, no being mandated to stay an extra 8 hours because someone called out, no admissions/discharges, etc.

    Sorry this reply turned into a novel! Good luck on your office-job hunt and feel free to PM me
    Chin up and Ginger80 like this.
  6. 0
    [quote=RxOnly;4764052]I worked in a Dr's office for 2 years as a fresh LPN grad. I worked for a few different docs. At this facility, each doc has a primary nurse. However, I've heard of some offices where nurses and docs kinda switch around a bit. I started out in pediatrics working for one of the busiest and meanest docs in the building. she saw about 40pts per day so it was constant go-go-go getting them in and out just to keep my head above water. I'd do vitals, vaccinations, EKG's, audio/visual screens, ear flushes, get urine samples, strep and flu swabs, etc. When the pediatrician was off, I'd work with a neurologist who had very few appts scheduled in a day because her appts were longer. All I'd do when working with her was BP, pulse, verify meds and allergies, and the occasional IV. A year later I transferred to Family Practice because I couldn't stand the pediatrician anymore and it was a little better. I had a great relationship with the doc and my duties were similar to those in the pediatric office but with the addition of screening phone calls for the doc, filling out prescription refill requests, and completing insurance prior authorizations.
    I have to say, there was literally zero triage at the facility. They'd see anyone with insurance for any reason just for the $$$- this turned into chaos sometimes because we'd get overbooked plus get walk-ins with chest pain or other ailments that should have prompted an ER visit and not a docs office visit. All the docs charted electronically, by the way.

    I think that a lot of other offices (from what I've noticed) are run more efficiently than the particular place I worked in (better triage and less overbooking). You may take a bit of a paycut going from LTC to the office, but it's definitely a quality-of-life-improvement if you like the "business hours" schedule. I've never worked LTC so I couldn't tell you whether or not it's easier, but I have the feeling it may be. No call bells, no chasing down CNAs, calling Doc's with lab values at 2am that no one bothered to address during the day, no being mandated to stay an extra 8 hours because someone called out, no admissions/discharges, etc.

    Sorry this reply turned into a novel! Good luck on your office-job hunt and feel free to PM m]for sure.
    Thank you so much for this advice! Your impression of LTC is right on! The Dr. office seems busy like a cash cow for sure!
  7. 1
    Quote from mermaidunderwater
    hi, i was wondering what a nurse in a dr.'s office does... an lpn not rn. is it easier than ltc or sub-acute??? please help! i have worked ltc and sub-acute for a few years now and i find it to be very difficult and burn out easy. i have been on a few interviews for dr. offices and they all ask "do u have experience in a dr. office" i say no...but i am thinking it has got to be sooo much easier i could totally do it! how am i to play up my skills and land a dr. office job? i feel as though they are forgetting or not acknowledging that ltc with 20 plus patients is not easy and that my lack of dr. office experience is besides the point b/c of that! i am also great on the computer etc. so that should not be a factor as i impart that on my resume! please help me to understand how i can play up my skills to get hired at a dr. office.heartbeat
    dr.s office is easier as far as it is more laid back, great hours, one-on-one patient time. dont assume its all a piece of case, there are frustrations, but typically easier to keep up with everything.
    big things that i emphasized in my interview where my computer skills, patient oriented care, and patient education (which you will do a lot) also positive attitude and punctuality. we also do alt of phoe triage, but that varies i guess.
    mermaidunderwater likes this.
  8. 1
    A lot of it will depend upone what kind of practice it is - peds and FP you will run your butt off and OB too. It will also depend on the doc your working with, if they are a nasty piece of work it can be awful, if they accept you as a team member it can be great.

    I did peds and FP w/OB (rural) and I loved the FP but the peds got old real quick. I did a lot of patient teaching, "organizing the doc" to keep them on time, chart review for labs, meds etc. I found you got to know your patients well but you also got to send them out the door too. Also, if you work with a good doc and they are really into staying up to date on the latest and greatest they support you in this. I'd do it again in a heartbeat, I'd also think I'd like the urgent care centers.
    rayshettabrown likes this.
  9. 0
    In my area, it is hard to get a job in a doctor's office as an LPN. Most hire Medical Assistants for less than half of what LPNs can be paid in LTC. I worked in doctor's offices for several years before going to nursing school. Yet since, I've found myself "overqualified" for many of the same positions.

    I have also seen offices push out LPNs and RNs and replace them with lesser qualified but cheaper MAs. I personally disagree with this, but it is common.


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