Lpn

  1. Greetings,

    I won't start LPN program until August 2008 so I decided to take a phlebotomy course until then. I just dropped it. I came to the conclusion I just really didn't like it and so I withdrew.

    My question is, does this mean I should not go on to LPN? Also don't
    LPN's not bother with venipuncture?

    The blood and needles didn't bother me, I just don't want to poke people all day.
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  2. 9 Comments

  3. by   agldragonRN
    Quote from trabbie93
    greetings,

    i won't start lpn program until august 2008 so i decided to take a phlebotomy course until then. i just dropped it. i came to the conclusion i just really didn't like it and so i withdrew.

    my question is, does this mean i should not go on to lpn? also don't
    lpn's not bother with venipuncture?

    the blood and needles didn't bother me, i just don't want to poke people all day.
    hi trabbie. don't give up with the lpn program. phlebotomy and lpn are two different things. you are not going to be poking your patients the whole day when you become an lpn. i am almost done with my lpn program and my teachers are not even putting any emphasis on the venipuncture class. they said i have to take it the last two weeks before i am done.

    is it really your dream to become a nurse? even if your answer now is no or you are not sure, why not try the first semester until you get to do the clinicals. when i started my program, my teacher asked us what our reasons were for doing the program, almost everybody said because it was their dream to be a nurse and and they like helping people. when it was my turn to answer, i said i want to be a nurse for the money and the job security and my teacher was kinda shocked alittle and said well, you're being honest.

    i was not sure in the beginning as well. but after experiencing my clinicals, i was like wow i really want to do this and i enjoy helping my patients. so i made the right decision. so it is really up to you. is your lpn program too expensive to try it out until the 1st semester? you don't want to
    keep wondering "what if?", right?

    angel, soon to be lpn (jan. 2008) yay!!
    Last edit by agldragonRN on Oct 24, '07 : Reason: spelling
  4. by   Trabbie93
    Thanks for responding back Angel.

    The post made me feel better about going on to Lpn.

    As for my dream, well the only dream I have ever had was to have a quiet life, which thankfully I have. I always thought I would be an Lpn. I actually went 1 semester about 14 years ago and got sick and quit. I had intentions of going back but just never made it. I went long enough to get my CNA and worked as an HHA for a while, and it is the ONLY job I have EVER had that I got any satisfaction out of. So I assume Lpn would be something to cure my need for security within myself and the need of the occasional pat on the back.

    The semester did not get into venipuncture. So I was unsure about that. I guess dropping the phlebotomy class recently just sort of made me doubt myself about going to Lpn. But it's good to hear I won't be poking all day.

    On that "what if" statement you made. Yeah, that is what is bothering me, for 14 years I have been saying that and I'm tired of constantly thinking about "what if" So I'm just doing it. Next year is a long wait but I can hold out. Feels good to not have think about those two little words "what if" anymore.

    Thanks again for the reply!
  5. by   pagandeva2000
    My LPN program did not require phlebotomy, but I had been a phlebotomist for 10 years prior to this. It definitely came in handy, because, I am not afraid to administer injections, and I do draw blood for the Coumadin Clinic (Coumadin is a blood thinner, that has to be drawn each time a patient visits there).

    What I do suggest is that you think about the statement that you don't wish to stick people all day...meaning are you just uncomfortable drawing blood, or are you adverse to sticking people in any manner? Your state may say that you are allowed to administer IVs...that is almost the same. Or, giving IMs, subcutaneous injections (for insulin, heparin and some vaccinations). This is not a criticism to you, just food for thought. Just today, I had to administer Bicillin for a patient who has syphillis; a HUGE HORSE needle that has to be injected slowly. It is painful for the patient and not a picnic for me, either. He has to come to me for two more injections. How comfortable would you be? If you are, then, I would say to rethink nursing.

    But, if you want a variety of things to do, and are not afraid of gross things, and are good with people, you will be okay. Good luck!
  6. by   Trabbie93
    Hello Pagan.

    Nah, it's nothing like I'm afraid to stick, I have no problems of that. I just don't want the job of running three floors in and out of 40 patients rooms to just draw blood. No offense to the people that do it, but it would seem to be extremely boring for me, 8 or 12 hours a day..yuck. I suppose I could have finished it up maybe got a part-time job doing it just for experience, but I just figured to cut my loss and let it go.

    There is a reason why venipuncture is of it's own entity (lab) in a hospital. Takes all day to gather blood nonstop. I would rather CNA duties over that. Which some nurses I assume would not do. Different stokes for differnt folks.:spin:
  7. by   kat7ap
    I've never had to use venipuncture as an LPN. I was never taught it in school either. In the hospital and nursing home setting someone from lab draws blood. If you work in a clinic or Dr.'s office you may do this more and injections much more often. However in most settings these things only take up a very small portion of your shift. Where I work I only do injections occasionally, the majority of my time is spent assessing the pt, teaching, assisting with breastfeeding, getting the pt to the bathroom and ambulating, administering IV and oral meds, and doing charting.
  8. by   TheCommuter
    I have never learned venipuncture, and have never had to use it as a skill in the healthcare setting. Phlebotomists and phlebotomy technicians from outside laboratories have always traveled to my facility to draw the patients' blood. If a facility needs you to draw blood, I am sure they will spend the time and money on training you how to perform phlebotomy.
  9. by   agldragonRN
    Quote from trabbie93
    thanks for responding back angel.

    the post made me feel better about going on to lpn.

    as for my dream, well the only dream i have ever had was to have a quiet life, which thankfully i have. i always thought i would be an lpn. i actually went 1 semester about 14 years ago and got sick and quit. i had intentions of going back but just never made it. i went long enough to get my cna and worked as an hha for a while, and it is the only job i have ever had that i got any satisfaction out of. so i assume lpn would be something to cure my need for security within myself and the need of the occasional pat on the back.

    the semester did not get into venipuncture. so i was unsure about that. i guess dropping the phlebotomy class recently just sort of made me doubt myself about going to lpn. but it's good to hear i won't be poking all day.

    on that "what if" statement you made. yeah, that is what is bothering me, for 14 years i have been saying that and i'm tired of constantly thinking about "what if" so i'm just doing it. next year is a long wait but i can hold out. feels good to not have think about those two little words "what if" anymore.

    thanks again for the reply!
    your welcome. even better, atleast now you will have an idea of what the first semester feel like. keep going and give your 110 percent. you will do great.

    angel
  10. by   MAmom81
    Quote from Trabbie93
    Greetings,

    I won't start LPN program until August 2008 so I decided to take a phlebotomy course until then. I just dropped it. I came to the conclusion I just really didn't like it and so I withdrew.

    My question is, does this mean I should not go on to LPN? Also don't
    LPN's not bother with venipuncture?

    The blood and needles didn't bother me, I just don't want to poke people all day.
    Well I hope that everything works out for you, Your so lucky though I wish that I was starting in August 2008!!! I am #85 on the LVN wait list at my local CC and the woman I talked too there said that I could possibly start in August 2008 but if not for sure in August 2009!!! I wish you luck and keep us posted!!!
  11. by   eldragon
    Well, I have 6 weeks left before I graduate from an LPN program, and the only thing I have stuck was a rubber arm when I got checked off for venipunture.

    I was supposed to have a full days clinical in an outpatient lab, drawing blood, but the schedule was changed and now I won't be able to have that experience.


    So, as an LPN, I hope I don't need to be an expert at venipunture.

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