Licensed Practical / Vocational Nurses (LPNs / LVNs) - page 2

by TheCommuter Asst. Admin

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In the nursing profession, LPN is a commonly utilized acronym that stands for licensed practical nurse. According to the Merriam Webster dictionary, a licensed practical nurse is defined as a person who has undergone training and... Read More


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    Quote from JoAnna78
    In Wisconsin the scope of practice is so loosely written that it's pretty much open to however the reader interprets it... The area I live in right now the LPNs seem to have a pretty restricted role depending on the facility and the facility's DON. I recently had one DON who reprimanded me for documenting lung sounds, she said that was an assessment. She would not allow the LPNs to document lung sounds and edema. Nor could we do a full head to toe on a patient. And she didn't want to me to draw blood. The next DON said LPNs can and should document lung sounds and edema. And she was shocked that the LPNs were not IV certified! The next DON didn't want LPNs in the facility at all! Obviously LPNs in this facility cannot do IVP meds. I had asked in the past about becoming IV certified but the DON and NHA had no interest in that.
    I don't know the difference between assessment and data collection. The distinction just doesn't seem clear to me .

    My LPN boards included breath sounds that I was to identify. I tell my RN counterparts that and the more reserved ones who consider that to be assessment material are frequently shocked
  2. 0
    It's so interesting to learn what LPNs are allowed, or in some instances, not allowed to do. I love this forum! Great to connect with other good nurses. I'm lucky to have had DONs who were appreciative of LPNs and didn't treat us like second-class nurses. The fact that our Nurse Practice Act in Tennessee is so restrictive was part of my motivation to advance my education.
  3. 0
    I'm in WI as well. My facility will allow LPN's to draw blood IF they are certified to do so, but no LPN is allowed to touch an IV in any way, shape or form. They don't start, flush, hang, or DC any IV site. Some LPN's will do an assessment, say after a fall, but others will play the "I'm JUST an LPN" card and want RN's to do it. Also if an EMS transport is required, they have to get report from an RN (which is crazy, there's a chance I know very little about the transferee!)

    Quote from JoAnna78
    In Wisconsin the scope of practice is so loosely written that it's pretty much open to however the reader interprets it... The area I live in right now the LPNs seem to have a pretty restricted role depending on the facility and the facility's DON. I recently had one DON who reprimanded me for documenting lung sounds, she said that was an assessment. She would not allow the LPNs to document lung sounds and edema. Nor could we do a full head to toe on a patient. And she didn't want to me to draw blood. The next DON said LPNs can and should document lung sounds and edema. And she was shocked that the LPNs were not IV certified! The next DON didn't want LPNs in the facility at all! Obviously LPNs in this facility cannot do IVP meds. I had asked in the past about becoming IV certified but the DON and NHA had no interest in that.
  4. 0
    In Missouri, an LPN can be a Charge Nurse in LTC. At times, the LPN will be the only nurse in the building, though there is typically an RN on call (if she answers her phone or not is another story). We can hang some IV's, but don't do IV Push. We can also do blood draws.


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