Job training in an LTC

  1. 0
    Ok - so I took and passed my NCLEX-PN in February, and started my new job in a LTC just a couple of weeks ago. I shadowed an RN for 3 days and on the 4th I was pulled to be a CNA for a resident who requires a 1:1. Last night was supposed to be my first night shadowing on NOC's which will be my regular shift, and instead I was again pulled to be the CNA 1:1.

    It is very frustrating to me that this keeps happening. It sure isn't helping with the continuity of my training! I went back to school to be an LPN, I was hired as an LPN and I thought I was supposed to be working as an LPN. I'm all for teamwork, but I feel this is ridiculous.

    So my question is - has this happened to anyone else? Is it common practice to pull the LPN's and have them work as a CNA? If so, then maybe my feathers are all ruffled for nothing and I just need to suck it up. Or, is this facility taking advantage of me and just using me as a warm body? ('cause that's kind of how I feel)...
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  3. 5 Comments so far...

  4. 0
    i think many ltc facilities do this. if we are short and can't find anyone to fill in, everyone pitches in, not just the lpn's, the rn's as well, sometimes even management. i personally have never had to do it myself. think of it another way, at least you get to learn a little more about your residents, before your real job responsibilities get in the way. cna's generally know whats going on with the residents, more than the nurses. i hope your at least getting paid as an lpn though.
  5. 0
    My orientation sucked and they asked me once to work as a cna, I refused. I'm still employed. I've never been trained in that facility as a cna so there is no way I'm going to be responsible for anything negative that would happen from me using a lift wrong or who knows what else.
  6. 0
    I've worked at several nursing homes and have never, ever been pulled to work as a CNA.
  7. 0
    Quote from TheCommuter
    I've worked at several nursing homes and have never, ever been pulled to work as a CNA.
    I second that. At the LTCFs where I have worked, if we were short CNAs usually they just had to take on a bigger load. I'd think that once you are off orientation you will be less likely to have to change roles because you will be the assigned nurse for that shift not an "extra".
  8. 0
    Quote from kat7ap
    once you are off orientation you will be less likely to have to change roles because you will be the assigned nurse for that shift not an "extra".
    I believe you are correct about this. Although, the RN's have told me that when they have been short of CNA's in the past they were asked if they would pick up a CNA shift to help out.

    I realize the CNA's usually are a wealth of information about the residents, but since I haven't worked in this facility as an aide, having me perform CNA duties still has problems. Even the new aides have an orientation to learn the routine and the residents. I did 1:1 on a potentially aggressive resident that I am not familiar with. In the end everything worked out ok, but the whole scenario just frustrates me.

    Thanks for everyone's input.


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