Help! I took the lpn course in high school

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    I took the LPN course in high school 2 years ago in 2011. I had a lot of things going on and didnt take the nclex. Now im ready to follow my passion, and take the NCLEX. The only problem is I dont feel confident in taking the NCLEX. What should I do? Do take I take a NCLEX review course a refresher course? Im not to sure. Can somebody give me some advice? Thank you so much.
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    Be sure that you are still eligible to take the NCLEX PN. If so, there are lots of test review courses, there are books that you can practice test, that type of thing. I would also be the first one to ask if as an alumni, you can go and audit some classes at your former school, that perhaps you are not strong in, just for a review.

    Good luck!
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    Do ready to pass review course it's really good and buy kaplans strategies book it shows you how to answer nclex questions and exam cram their was a lot of similar thing hint* and la charity priority delegation book even though its a Rn book it's good for learning how to handle sata questions and what patient to choose first and that's all the things I feel that helped me pass
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    For some reason that bothers me that the LPN course is offered in high school. It's almost a slap in the face of those of us who had to take all our pre-reqs and the year-long program in college. I'd just never heard of high schools offering LPN as an option. The high schools near me offer some healthcare classes and you'll be a CNA when you graduate, but never an LPN. I apologize if I came across as mean. When and where did you do your clinicals? My nursing school alone was full-time for a year. Three days a week clinicals and two days a week classroom, vice versa for some parts of it, so I'm wondering what sort of time frame yours was.

    Anyway, congrats for taking and passing the class! I'd check with your school and BON to see if you're still eligible to sit or if you'll need a refresher course. Definitely take an NCLEX prep class. Good luck!!!
    NurseJoy33, Fiona59, and mds1 like this.
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    T-Bird,I totally understand what you are saying here as well.I too was an LPN and had to go through the whole yr+ process and practiced as an LPN for 22yrs before I became an RN almost 2 yrs ago. But, unfortunately I've heard that some states are doing some of this.I know my state is doing this some in our high school BUT, it's like the pre-req part.Certainly,not the actually nursing and clinical part so I too feel like it is a slap in the face for those of us that went through blood, sweat and tears to get there the traditional way.

    Bryanp93-I too would tell you to start with you state BON and then if you are eligible then go online to look up a review. I actually went online and did one for my RN and they had one for LPN too.The RN one was great! I took it only because I was freaked out that I couldn't pass because it had been so long in taking my LPN NCLEX but, for my RN it promptly shut off at 75 where when I took my LPN it was the long 2 day proctored test of like 1000 people and I could not get that experience out of my head.(lol) Good luck and let us know what you find out and I'll try to look up the name of the review if you need it.
    Fiona59 likes this.
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    In my neck of the woods, an LPN course of study is offered in vocational/technical high schools. (along with hairdressing, auto mechanic, building trades, culinary arts...). It is a non-tradtional high school.

    One week of nursing classes, the next of clinicals. Add that to 2 years, (which is one's jr. and sr. year of high school) and it equals out to what a technical school will teach adults seeking an LPN diploma full time. (freshman and sophmore years, they complete their traditional educational requirements, taking the "CAS" tests state required for graduation.

    After year 1, it (Jr year) it qualifies a student be certified as a CNA. (which is far longer than someone who takes just a CNA course). Clinicals and nursing courses in year 2 (senior year) means that they qualify for the NCLEX. No one can sit for the NCLEX PN without having a certain state mandated number of clinical hours/classroom hours. The only thing that can happen is that if a student is 17 at the time of the end of senior year, and clinicals require you to be 18, they need to continue with clinical rotations after high school until the requirement is met.

    Many, many communities have vocational/technical high schools. They are aimed at a non-traditional student whose choice is not a college prep situation. Each state is set up differently, as is each school. As are course offerings. As an adult, I went to a vocational school for my LPN. I took the same course as the high school kids did during the day. The school I attended had a number of vocational choices. Many chose to work as an LPN, a CNA, a mechanic, an electrician, then pursued college, advanced certifications, that type of thing.

    I wish I was in an area when I could have done this in high school, as I would have most certainly been able to pay my way through college by working before life got in the way.
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    That's so crazy you can do LPN in high school! I know what kind of technical school you are talking about but ours only let you sit for the CNA exam after two years. I went to a technical college and my LPN room a year total but I have never seen a hs program offer that. If its still the same proper training and clinical hours, I think it's nice for people who may not otherwise have a chance to do it otherwise. Although I do wonder how they offer it for free...who is paying for all of the clinical instructors, supplies, books, etc?
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    Quote from HippyDippyLPN
    That's so crazy you can do LPN in high school! I know what kind of technical school you are talking about but ours only let you sit for the CNA exam after two years. I went to a technical college and my LPN room a year total but I have never seen a hs program offer that. If its still the same proper training and clinical hours, I think it's nice for people who may not otherwise have a chance to do it otherwise. Although I do wonder how they offer it for free...who is paying for all of the clinical instructors, supplies, books, etc?
    They are tuition based high schools, usually.
    It is the same as an adult, we had to take and pass the "TEAS" test (or most LPN programs do) and get a certain score in each category to get into the LPN program.

    Well, so do the high school kids. Which they take begining junior year. And I know in my state, in order to obtain a state sanctioned diploma, one also has to pass a general education test "CAS" as well. So thats a lot of testing.


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