Does it ever concern you that we could be making more doing bartending? - page 2

This is something that has been troubling me for a while. I'm starting to think that if I gave up nursing and started bartending, I'd probably be better off financially. I do not want to quit my job,... Read More

  1. by   llg
    I agree with all of the above posts ... and want to add that with good career planning and financial planning, most nurses do not have to "live paycheck to paycheck" forever. The money in nursing may not be terrific, but it is enough to live a comfortable middle-class lifestyle in most communities. If that is not the case with you, you should be assessing why not and taking steps to improve your financial management and/or advance in your nursing career and/or change jobs to a better one and/or relocate to a place where you can support yourself on your nursing income.

    llg
  2. by   SFCardiacRN
    You'll never get rich being a nurse but it is steady work. Low chance of layoff. Solid middle class employment with decent benefits. Nursing has more variety than any other job I can think of. Getting burned out? Transfer to a different unit. My bartender friends like to brag about a good night of tips but they don't live as well as I do. They have no insurance and always seem broke!
  3. by   mstigerlily
    As others have said, lots of jobs that pay better. I worked various jobs for years and years where I made quite a bit of tax free easy cash and whilel they were fun, money was good and in many ways they were easier than nursing in other ways much harder. But they got old real fast. Those kinds of of job doesn't have a good long term future or much respect from other people. I am proud to say I'm a nurse.

    Quote from blynn
    This is something that has been troubling me for a while. I'm starting to think that if I gave up nursing and started bartending, I'd probably be better off financially. I do not want to quit my job, but at the same time, living from paycheck to paycheck for the rest of my life doesn't sound all that appealing.

    Anyone else get that sinking feeling sometimes and suddenly start frantically trying to remember what you need to make a White Russian?
    Last edit by mstigerlily on Oct 26, '06
  4. by   following_faith
    As someone who was in real estate-which had excellent money, but no benefits, no security plus having to wait 6 weeks for a paycheck (if everything went smoothly for those weeks) I can say that pay means less to me than knowing that I have a steady job and benefits for my children.

    But my bottom line is that I am in it for two reasons: the people and the skill involved (mentally stimulating).

    Plus where else can you earn one degree but be able to try dozens of things and have all your future education paid for? Ooh-and get your full time work week in 3 days?

    Nursing does have perks!
  5. by   Doubledee
    My Dad ran a pub for years. I worked for him a few summers. On occasion, some of my patients noted my technique when I poured a "chaser" for his pills. I learned a lot about nursing from my bartender Dad and the time I spent behind the "stick". Customer service, listening and empathy are critical in both jobs.
    I miss the tips but not having my clothes smell of smoke at the end of the night.
    What really hurt me was making more as a CNA than I did as a teacher.
  6. by   Nemhain
    Quote from blynn
    This is something that has been troubling me for a while. I'm starting to think that if I gave up nursing and started bartending, I'd probably be better off financially. I do not want to quit my job, but at the same time, living from paycheck to paycheck for the rest of my life doesn't sound all that appealing.

    Anyone else get that sinking feeling sometimes and suddenly start frantically trying to remember what you need to make a White Russian?
    Bartending can be fun, really fun. Maybe you can just pick up a shift or two on a weekend. My friend is in nursing school and she can't wait to be a nurse, but she also loves the social atmosphere at the bar. She does make more per hour than many nurses (about $200 for a six hour shift), but there are no benefits (well, having fun is a big benefit, but there are no paid vacations or health insurance). If you want to try it, I think you should. If you end up being miserable go back to nursing; if you end up happier, you should stay.
  7. by   SecondCareer?
    Quote from Doubledee
    My Dad ran a pub for years. I worked for him a few summers. On occasion, some of my patients noted my technique when I poured a "chaser" for his pills. I learned a lot about nursing from my bartender Dad and the time I spent behind the "stick". Customer service, listening and empathy are critical in both jobs.
    I miss the tips but not having my clothes smell of smoke at the end of the night.
    What really hurt me was making more as a CNA than I did as a teacher.

    I am currently a teacher looking at going into nursing because of the benefits nursing offers.... flexible work schedule, medical benefits that aren't so out-of-pocket expensive, multiple opportunities for advancement, better pay, tuition re-imbursement, potential to work P/T, etc. Not to mention that as a nurse I won't have endless piles of paperwork that I take home, I will work fewer hours, and no yearly contract to fulfill. (If you become unhappy, it's a really long year! I've had two of these now.)

    SecondCareer
  8. by   SFCardiacRN
    Variety of tasks and flexibility of schedual make nursing hard to beat!
  9. by   BigB
    Quote from Doubledee
    I miss the tips but not having my clothes smell of smoke at the end of the night.
    What really hurt me was making more as a CNA than I did as a teacher.
    It's not just the "smell" of smoke , but the inhalation of second hand smoke that you have to deal with. Over the long run that can affect your respitory status.
  10. by   sergelpn
    Ya know..I was a bartender way before I became a nurse and ya it was fun..but it wasn't rewarding..I did alot of laughing and flirting and Shuting down someone's TAB..so hopefully they could drive home responsibly..But as a nurse it's a rewarding job..I lve. to go home knowing I gave some one 100% of my ability to hopefully make them well..
    If it's the $$ take 1-2 classes a semester and get your RN..you maybe broke for awhile but in the long run you'll be happy that you stuck with your career.. Best of Luck..
  11. by   halogen
    My co-worker current earns $19.80 per hour working a second job (as a factory hand). I work in the private sector for $14.00 per hr as a registered nurse. I am in-charge of 5 staff/22 patients per duty. A registered nurse working for the public district health board nets $25.00 per hr plus weekend and nocte penal rates. Their workload can range from 6-8 patients per shift. On-top of my poor hourly rate I owe the goverment for training-a huge sum of $16.000. :imbar
  12. by   halogen
    My co-worker current earns $19.80 per hour working a second job (as a factory hand). I work in the private sector for $14.00 per hr as a registered nurse. I am in-charge of 5 staff/22 patients per duty. A registered nurse working for the public district health board nets $25.00 per hr plus weekend and nocte penal rates. Their workload can range from 6-8 patients per shift. On-top of my poor hourly rate I owe the goverment for training-a huge sum of $16.000. :imbar.
  13. by   TheCommuter
    Quote from halogen
    My co-worker current earns $19.80 per hour working a second job (as a factory hand). I work in the private sector for $14.00 per hr as a registered nurse. I am in-charge of 5 staff/22 patients per duty. A registered nurse working for the public district health board nets $25.00 per hr plus weekend and nocte penal rates. Their workload can range from 6-8 patients per shift. On-top of my poor hourly rate I owe the goverment for training-a huge sum of $16.000. :imbar.
    If you earn $14.00 hourly as an RN, you most likely live in a rural area. Either that or your geographic region must have a unique oversupply of nurses.

    The vast majority of LVNs/LPNs that I am acquainted with earn over $14.00 hourly. I was once a factory worker without any education beyond high school and my hourly rate for the factory work was $15.20 per hour.

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