Do you know your (LPNs) scope of practice? - page 2

by KRODD | 7,996 Views | 22 Comments

Care to venture any guesses guys?... Read More


  1. 0
    Why can't we all just get along? Instead of arguing, why don't we just direct this person to a link that shows all 50 states Scope of Practice for an LPN?
  2. 3
    Quote from hfullerCNA
    Why can't we all just get along? Instead of arguing, why don't we just direct this person to a link that shows all 50 states Scope of Practice for an LPN?
    We're trying to obtain more information from the OP because his questions are vague and missing quite a bit of pertinent information. There seems to be an issue with assimilating the answers already given due to the follow-up post asking about the "General scope of practice" when there is no such thing as a "General scope of practice". Several people advised him to check the LPN scope in his home state. It wouldn't be productive to provide such a link to a page that has all 50 state Scopes of Practice if it exists because I'm sure he can figure out how to do that himself. Being able to communicate clearly and pro-actively learn how to research your own questions are important in nursing.
  3. 1
    In my area LPns are only being replaced at hospitals. RNs that are hired at ltc only stay long enough for experience and then move to the hospitals. Also in my area there are 3 hospitals that will hire RNs but must agree to get their BSN within 5 years of employment. I work in Ltc & rehab- our company wants 50/50. As an LPNim tired if worrying about being phased out. If it happens, it happens. Medical care will go up, RN pay will either go down or stay the same which companies that are use to hiring LPNs will wonder why their expenses are higher.
    BrandonLPN likes this.
  4. 0
    Quote from caringinpractice
    Is anyone else concerned , in an effort to save money that LPN's are being used as RN's. If that's the case then RN's are no longer needed. The BON guidelines between RN and LPN states that the LPN is supervised by the RN, however in this case there is NO supervison and management is permitting this violation of the BON nursing scope of practice to be allowed....the patient is assessed from the getgo by the LPN and the RN is bypassed in an effort for more pt's to be processed.
    Yes, I believe all 50 states say that the LPN is supervised by a RN or a doctor. So in a doctors office where there's a doctor present..... a RN isn't required to supervise the LPN. The doctor fills that role. In LTC, LPNs do function under the supervision of a RN, but that supervision can be in the form of the RN being a phone call away. Many, many, nursing homes in many many states function with no RNs present at all on after hour shifts. Everyone knows most facilities operate with only LPNs in the building much of the time. LTC would grind to a halt if a RN was required to literally supervise in person all the LPNs.
  5. 0
    Being an LPN for over 30 years, I am well aware of MY scope of practice. I have a job, but I belong to no one.
    "Do you know your (LPNs) scope of practice?"
  6. 1
    Quote from hfullerCNA
    Why can't we all just get along? Instead of arguing, why don't we just direct this person to a link that shows all 50 states Scope of Practice for an LPN?
    No one is arguing here.......Why don we direct them to a web site?

    There isn't just one.....each state has their own rules and regs within the individual states nurse practice acts. Then it varies from facility to facility what they are will to allow the LPN to do because then they have competencies and documentation of continuing education that allow the LPN a larger scope of practice.

    It then depends on the RN's in their employ and how many they employ per LPN for ensure that the LPN is under the RN direction as most states allow LPNS a pretty wide scope although some tasks need to be directly observed by the RN. Many facilities do not want the hassle.....nor do they employ the correct ratio of RN to LPN.

    LPN' in an LTAC setting are pretty independent and in fact do many of the same things the RN does.....in my state that is.....after they are given competency exams approved by the state and medical staff to enure the LPN is up to par for the position and added responsibility.

    Lastly....if this is a school assignment we a re glad to help them to the right answer but just doing the homework for them will not make them a better nurse.
    OnlybyHisgraceRN likes this.
  7. 1
    Quote from KRODD
    I meant this as a General scope of practice


    Ie. stable patients or patients with predictable outcomes!
    Please explain further....whether or not a specific nurse is with in their scope of practice depends of their experience, addition training and policy to the facility.

    I have had LPN's take unstable patients that have the background and experience to know what to react to and know when to ask for help. LPN"s are limited in their practice, unfortunately. For example if I had a GI bleed that was actively receiving massive amounts of blood and blood products...I might consider not giving that patient to the LPN and give it to the RN....depending on the other patients on the unit. But I just might give the LPN that patient as long as the RN is available to start and stop the transfusions with the LPN....if the LPN ha the experience to know how to deal with that patient and the RN is a new grad.

    There are many factors that go into the delegation of care.....what is the point you are trying to make? you are New a LPN correct? Did someone upset you? What exactly are you looking for?
    OnlybyHisgraceRN likes this.
  8. 0
    I hire all the RNs I can for my facility. The 5 star rating system is based in part on numbers. And, with the sicker and more clinically complex patients we are getting, I need RNs who can assess these residents.
  9. 0
    Quote from CapeCodMermaid
    I hire all the RNs I can for my facility. The 5 star rating system is based in part on numbers. And, with the sicker and more clinically complex patients we are getting, I need RNs who can assess these residents.
    And if you were to hire new grad RN's, or RN's with little clinical experience, an LPN just may be the better choice to assess such patients. I graduated LPN school in 2007. The amount of hours in both acute and skilled care clinical settings was considerable. I could clinically think in my sleep after all that. Even RN's take on leadership roles in acute care when having little to no clinical experience. Just like everything else, depends on the state, the facility, and the LPN's experience.
  10. 0
    Quote from jadelpn
    And if you were to hire new grad RN's, or RN's with little clinical experience, an LPN just may be the better choice to assess such patients. I graduated LPN school in 2007. The amount of hours in both acute and skilled care clinical settings was considerable. I could clinically think in my sleep after all that. Even RN's take on leadership roles in acute care when having little to no clinical experience. Just like everything else, depends on the state, the facility, and the LPN's experience.
    I bet she wasn't talking subjective (who vs who). She rather goes with the standards and BON. Assessments is not within LPN's scope of practice by most states if not all. However, states don't say how much of experience a RN needs. A RN is a RN is a RN. (I just made this up, but it really fits).


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