Do you feel the LVN/Lpn Is being left out in the nursing profession? - page 8

Alot of the issue lately being brought up in the senate concerns RNs do you feel the Lpn/Lvn is being left out in the issues presented?... Read More

  1. by   Marie_LPN, RN
    Quote from Hellllllo Nurse

    CNA- job is physically hard. You are responsible only for your own work and performance. When you are done with your shift- you're done. No worrying about what was missed, no taking any paper-work home, no staying over to chart, and certainly no missing breaks and lunches.
    A lot of why i missed my breaks was the debate of "should i go eat or leave 3 people on dirty wet linen", which turned into a lunch break-free shift. Repeatedly.

    3. No one ever says "Are you going to get your RN?" anymore.
    I haven't even GRADUATED and that **** phrase has worn thin on me already lol. I just wish people that said that phrase would think before they spoke.
  2. by   tiona
    Quote from Hellllllo Nurse
    When I was an LPN (for 8 years), I was treated wonderfully, as an equal, by the majority of RNs whom I worked with. Of course, there was the occasional wacked-out power tripping RN, but you will find that with every occupation, at every level.

    I've gone from CNA to LPN to RN. Here are the main differences I find beween every level.

    CNA- job is physically hard. You are responsible only for your own work and performance. When you are done with your shift- you're done. No worrying about what was missed, no taking any paper-work home, no staying over to chart, and certainly no missing breaks and lunches.

    LPN- job is physically, socially, mentally hard. You are now responsible for the work, actions and performance of not only yourself, but all staff under you and for all pts in your care. The RN is responsible for your actions, performance, etc. If you have a problem or concern, and you are unsure of what to do, inform the RN. She is now responsible for it. You can go on to other things.

    RN- job is physically, socially, mentally and politically hard. You are now responsible for the actions and performance of everyone around you- and for all pt outcomes, annoyed "customers" and their relatives. Balancing being responsible for everyone and everything with maintaining positive relations with those whom you are responsible for can be tricky. The docs are *supposed* to be ultimately responsible for the pts, but they are not physically on the premesis for more than a few minutes a day. You are now ultimately responsible for everything that does or does not occur while you are on the premesis.

    Being charge nurse is a stressor/burden I can certainly do without- it is not at all worth the extra buck an hour I get to do it.

    The atvantages of being an RN over being an LPN (strictly in my own opinion and experiences)-

    1. Pay increased by $5.00 an hr.
    2. My clinical opinions and concerns are listened to a little bit more than they were as an LPN.
    3. No one ever says "Are you going to get your RN?" anymore.
    4. Being treated as a more "legitimate" nurse.
    5. Being legally considered a professional.

    Disatvantages:
    1. Being responsible and held accountable for the bad actions or inactions of others. but, nothing is ever mentioned when things go well.
    2. Constantly hearing "We do the same job as the RN, we should get paid the same" from people who only know part of what I do and am responsible for.
    3. People frequently saying "Aren't you going to get a bachelor's degree?"
    4. Frequently hearing about how ADN RNs are "on the way out"- a BSN should be the minimum standard education for nurses.
    5. Frequently being the only RN in the building- there is no one else to go to if there is a problem or concern. I had better come up with the right answer, and act on it, NOW.

    Was it worth it? I say yes. Was my ADN program more academically difficult than my LPN? No. It was, however, far more politically difficult. And more time consuming.
    Did going to RN school teach me how to be an RN? No. Working as an RN did that.

    Am I appreciative, grateful and thankful to be working with the great LPNs that I work with? Do I learn from them, and they from me?

    Are we all Nurses?

    Heck, YES.
    Bless you, my friend!
  3. by   LolaRN
    Tiona- you sure hit the nail on the head.
  4. by   Sandra Evans
    I believe that LPNs are not recgnized as nurses. I have over heard RNs call LPNs glorified CNAs. I myself am proud to be a LPN and believe that LPNs along with CNAs are truly the backbone of the medical profession. These two groups of individuals may have more contact with the patient than the MD or RN and may be able to give valuable insight into the progress of a patient. So, everyone let us please STOP forgetting about some of our professions most prestigous members.
  5. by   NurseRatchett
    Tiona -
    I'm in the L.A. area where competition is fierce. I have family in the Fresno area who are always always telling me to move up there because they're in desperate need of LVN's..........so you might want to check that out. Home health is an easy position because you only have one patient and you form a bond with them and the family.
    There are lots and lots of cases involving sick children available. Some agencies in California to consider are NurseFinders and Maxim Healthcare. See what they're offering in your area. And the good thing about being a temp is the assignments are short to long term, the pay is good, and if you don't like it you can find something else. Much easier than actually being "hired". Hope this helps you in a big way!!
  6. by   Nursekat64
    Quote from kjmta57
    Alot of the issue lately being brought up in the senate concerns RNs do you feel the Lpn/Lvn is being left out in the issues presented?
    How are we able to let our voices be heard???
  7. by   hotrodrn
    Quote from BrandyBSN
    In the hospital I take clinicals, Only RNs can take phone orders. I just assumed this was a weird hospital policy.

    Why cant LPNs take phone orders? Its a matter of listening and transcribing right? I am sure LPNs should be qualified to do that.

    Also, i do not understand why LPNs in Missouri can not start IVs. My friend who is an LPN told me that LPNs learn how to start them in school, just like we do. It confuses me?
    Brandy,
    LPN's in MO can start IV's They just have to get an extra certification for it by going to another class after they graduate from LPN school. Dont ask why its retarded I dont know. But I do know about this because I started with my LPN in MO.
  8. by   hotrodrn
    Quote from SKM-NURSIEPOOH
    Dear Paprikat,
    My point exactly Just because I'm going for my RN-BSN doesn't give me the right to look down on RNs-ADN, RNs-Diploma, LPNs, or CNAs. As far as I'm concerned, I will always be a LPN at heart I just hate it when I see other people do this. It's bad enough to see someone who was never a LPN and have started-out being a RN to put us down (this is probably due to not being in our shoes inaddition to being taught this concept in school); but I have no patience for those who were LPNs and then move-on with this type of attitude
    Amen! I think that is terrible. I used to be an LPN and to tell you the truth I wished I still was. Actually I still am at heart. I would never look down on an LPN,CNA,RN-ADN,RN-Diploma.
  9. by   mattsmom81
    Quote from hotrodrn
    Amen! I think that is terrible. I used to be an LPN and to tell you the truth I wished I still was. Actually I still am at heart. I would never look down on an LPN,CNA,RN-ADN,RN-Diploma.
    I agree. Unfortunately there is too much one upsmanship in nursing and this is propogated from within. We all make our unique contributions and deserve the respect of our coworkers. I am a former LPN as well and enjoy working with LPN's. Sadly, our facilities are, in too many cases, dropping the ball in providing workable conditions for ALL nurses.
  10. by   HAPPYNPROUD
    LPN's in Missouri are allowed to start IV's. I am currently an LPN who is IV certified. The class I graduated in (1999) was the first class to offer IV certification as a part of the curriculum.

    I just completed Excelsior's ADN program, and I'm studying for the NCLEX-RN.

    Here in MO, LPN's work in nursing homes, hospitals, acute care settings, as well as in positions such as research coordinators.

    Good Luck with your career,

    Lorri
  11. by   Nursekat64
    I would really like to see this explode on this site and go futher. I would like to know how a major hospital chain can give a raise to Rn's weekender and PRN , but not to LPN; PRN and weekender.
    Also why do hospital have RISE projects for RN's and nothing for LPN's and thirdly, why can't LPN's be nominated for Nurse of the year?
  12. by   jaimemds
    I am an L.P.N. in OH and I.V. certified. I wirk in a LTC facility that is JCAHO certified. We recently found out that L.P.N.'s can no longer do admission ax's (because of JCAHO)!!!! Can you believe that? How can we not do admission ax's, yet be responsible enough to catch critical changes in our residents' healthon a daily basis??? More job security for R.N.'s I guess. It infuriates me that TPTB think we are not skilled enough to do this, but can do sterile central line dressing changes. Seems to me, the latter of the tasks, which could be more harmful to the pt. if done wrong, is allowed so that the R.N. doesn't have to belittle themselves to dressing changes. What amazes me, is that on my "RN only unit" iI am 1 of 2 LPN's and no one knew I was an L.P.N. for a long time until they looked at my badge, because of the amount of knowledge and skill level I have achieved. :angryfire
  13. by   kaseysmom
    Quote from BrandyBSN
    In the hospital I take clinicals, Only RNs can take phone orders. I just assumed this was a weird hospital policy.

    Why cant LPNs take phone orders? Its a matter of listening and transcribing right? I am sure LPNs should be qualified to do that.

    Also, i do not understand why LPNs in Missouri can not start IVs. My friend who is an LPN told me that LPNs learn how to start them in school, just like we do. It confuses me?
    LPN's are assumed to not have the capability to "triage". They have to be able to differentiate between a life threatening problem and something that can wait. Ex: shortness of breath - should the go to the er or come to the office??. Most people assume that LPNs don't know how to do that but I know a lot of LPNs who would be more than capable to make that decision.

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