Do you carry malpractice insurance?

  1. I'm really considering it esp since I'm thinking about working for an agency.
    What are your thoughts? Check out this article.

    Malpractice suits against nurses on the rise.
    Nov, 2007 * Nursing Practice--News You Can Use

    This article by Catherine Domrose is worth the reading as it discusses issues concerning malpractice suits against nurses and suggestions for alleviating the possibility of being sued. Because of the nursing shortage, nurses taking on more responsibilities and the acuity of the patients becoming greater, nurses must become more aware of the possibilities of human error. One of the issues addressed in this article include why nurses get sued. As stated by nurse legal experts who were interviewed for this story--"Some of the biggest lawsuits against nurses include medication errors, communication errors, failure to monitor and assess, failure to properly advocate for the patient, working while impaired, (whether by inadequate sleep or controlled substances) and negligent or inappropriate delegation and supervision." One of the suggestions for reducing the risk includes documentation. So many times we, as nurses, take documentation for granted and rush through the process; however, this may be our best defense if there is ever a lawsuit filed. All the way through nursing school we were reminded that "If it is not documented, we did not do it." With this in mind, although tedious, nurses should make charting and plan of care two of the most important parts of caring for the patient. In the article, it also lists ways to minimize the risk for getting sued: Thorough documentation, follow the chain of command, make the patient your partner, recognize system flaws and report them, and consider carrying individual malpractice insurance.
    The article also point out that nurses have to assume control of their practice by following the standards of practice as pointed out by the state and agency for which they are employed, calling the physician repeatedly (even if they might get angry), telling the supervisor they cannot work that extra shift and not letting anyone interrupt them while giving medications.
    Something to think about, ten years ago, 20% of malpractice suits were law suits against nurses. Today, that number has grown to over 35%. Nurses know more, do more, and have less time to do it (Pritzker | Ruohonen & Associates, P.A., 2006).
    Nursing Malpractice. 2006. Retrieved on 9/9/07
  2. 10 Comments

  3. by   AllSmiles225
    ABSOLUTELY 100%--You NEED to carry your own malpractice insurance--most facilities will throw you under the bus if there is some kind of medication error. It costs under one hundred dollars for the year and may be the best investment you ever make.
  4. by   DebanamRN
    I would not work without my own malpractice. NSO + $100 = peace of mind.
  5. by   MzMouse
    I have nurse's liability insurance as part of my homeowner's policy. I agree that you need to carry your own coverage.
  6. by   systoly
    As mentioned above, for about $8.00 a month it's an easy decision. So even if you're in doubt, go ahead, take a chance on blowing eight bucks this month.
  7. by   Fiona59
    It's included in my yearly practice permit fees (we carry $2million)
  8. by   Sydangle2
    I had NSO M. Inusurance ... somehow somewhere I didn't renew can't believe it...
    I decided to def. pick it up again ...... thanx for responses Just wondered
    where everyone stood w/ this.:wink2:
  9. by   softstorms
    Your job is your job, but you life is your own. Only your own insurance will protect YOU! Please invest in it and hope you never need it.
  10. by   NurseKitten
    I wouldn't work a day without it.
  11. by   pawsomepooch47
    [font=fixedsys]don't leave home without it!
  12. by   HM7380
    I was told by my facility that if we/I were sued, they would come after the facility, not me. (though, I'm afraid they wouldn't get much from me, lol)