Do LPNs Get the Respect They Deserve? - page 3

by Truly_Blessed

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ok, well, i am a pre-nursing student. i am waiting to see if i get accepted to an lpn program right now. i later plan on finishing up and getting my degree after i have worked as an lpn for awhile. since i have made this decision... Read More


  1. 0
    At this point in time it's almost a funny story.
    30 years ago when I was a student LPN, a classmate asked the instructor a question. I don't even remember what it was now but I do remember her answer. It was: "Y'all are only gonna be LPNs, you don't need to know that."

    It was the last question she answered. Several of us went to our administrator and inquired as to why she would say something like that. She was fired immediately. This one nurse set the stage for us all those years ago.

    Simple fact is, if you know enough to ask a question, you need to know the answer. Period.

    Point is, there are many predjudices in nursing and many of those come from RNs who have no idea what LPNs study in school. Since these RNs do not know enough to ask a question to find out our level of education, they don't need to know the answer. They could not understand it.

    Think of this for a minute.

    When I went to LPN school, preadmission testing required collegiate level scores in the humanities, sciences and English. Then we spent 12 months studying nursing courses. We used the same text books a couple of the RN programs in town were using for at least two of our courses. (one was Good Samaritan Hospital Diploma Program and the other was the University of Cincinati BSN program)
    The ADN program in town offers 2 school years of classes. 9 months each. 1/2 of that is spent in ... what? the same things my school required us to test in before admission. Who got more nursing education? (I won't even go into the sorry excuse the ADN and BSN programs have for clinical experience when compared to our LPN program!)

    Any predjudiices in nursing are stemming from ignorance. Ignore it, it's part of human life, it, unfortunately, will never go away.

    I have worked in numerous states. Always had to have an RN in the building in acute care. Needed an RN "on-call" in long term care and home care. And I don't ever remember having to call them because I was legally unable to perform my duties.

    I am rambling. Nursing education is and always has been a hot topic for me. Sorry but I sure do love the opportunity to vent!
  2. 0
    undefinedundefined

    just a little history first. i was a health care aid and then became a registered nurse assistant then a registered nurse. last year i took a job in ltc as a supervisor, now i am a charge nurse.
    i have the greatest respect for anyone working on my floor regardless of their personal title.
    the hca's work their fingers to the bone, they never hestitate to do something if i ask and the lpn's/rna's are very hard working.
    i seldom need to give them direction. when they ccome to me for direction they are informative and have all the information gathered for me to make an informed decision. rarely they have misjudged something.
    i personally love having rpn's. at out facility the only things lpn's can't do are the following. injections, cathetars unless they have been certified. g-tube feedings.
    i love my lpn's they are intellegent and dedicated

    if you want hands on in ltc lpn is the way to go if you want to push a lot of paper then rn is the way to go
    it is all a very personal choice
    good luck in whatever you do
  3. 0
    Quote from sixes
    undefinedundefined
    at out facility the only things lpn's can't do are the following. injections, cathetars unless they have been certified. g-tube feedings.
    that's seems like about all i do! cath, meds/injections/g-tube,g-button feeds and change the above when needed. where do you work?
  4. 0
    Quote from Dixiedi
    When I went to LPN school, preadmission testing required collegiate level scores in the humanities, sciences and English. Then we spent 12 months studying nursing courses. We used the same text books a couple of the RN programs in town were using for at least two of our courses. (one was Good Samaritan Hospital Diploma Program and the other was the University of Cincinati BSN program)
    The ADN program in town offers 2 school years of classes. 9 months each. 1/2 of that is spent in ... what? the same things my school required us to test in before admission. Who got more nursing education? (I won't even go into the sorry excuse the ADN and BSN programs have for clinical experience when compared to our LPN program!)

    Any predjudiices in nursing are stemming from ignorance. Ignore it, it's part of human life, it, unfortunately, will never go away.

    I have worked in numerous states. Always had to have an RN in the building in acute care. Needed an RN "on-call" in long term care and home care. And I don't ever remember having to call them because I was legally unable to perform my duties.

    I am rambling. Nursing education is and always has been a hot topic for me. Sorry but I sure do love the opportunity to vent!
    Are you saying that LPNs in your school, community, or area of your state get more education that RNs? That's very interesting. Why not just call yourself an RN and call it a day. <tongue in cheek> I know. I know....You don't *want* to be a RN.
  5. 0
    "The ADN program in town offers 2 school years of classes. 9 months each. 1/2 of that is spent in ... what? the same things my school required us to test in before admission"

    Ummmm liberal arts, Anat and Phys, Child Dev, Psych, Sociology, Chem, Microbio ---all of those are usually taken BEFORE you begin school for an ADN program. And you can't get tested in, you actually have to complete the credits(not to mention get an A to get into nursing school these days)
  6. 0
    Quote from NursesRmofun
    Are you saying that LPNs in your school, community, or area of your state get more education that RNs? That's very interesting. Why not just call yourself an RN and call it a day. <tongue in cheek> I know. I know....You don't *want* to be a RN.
    Actually yes I am saying the LPNs from my school get more nursing education than the ADN nurses in my community, at least at that time. The hospital school of PN I went to no longer exsists so I have no way of judging any more. When I went to LPN school, there was also a community based school with an LPN program. I do not believe I could be convinced they got the same level of quality education I got.

    I have to wonder if it is still the same way. I did, many years ago begin the proccess of lpn - ADN. Family responsibilities put a stop to the proccess. I have onnly recently begun the proccess again. I never said I don't want to be an RN. Yes, in fact I do. Money is the motivation, it is the only motivation because in my current position (pediatric home health) I have the same responsibilites as the RNs on my cases. I simply do not "take" cases with a c-line.

    Anyway, I started the proccess many years ago and had the liberal arts/sciences and humanities out of the way. I had taken some of the nursing courses. Frankly, I didn't learn a lot more. Of course, I do admit I was an experienced nurse by then and do not sleep on the job. I kept my carreer moving in such a way that I broadened my horizons regularly. That also makes a difference I am sure.

    Just last night I was working a case where there are 4 foster children with special needs in the home. Two nurses on duty. The other was an RN and we did get into quizzing each other to stay awake. With reference books in hand we quizzed each other for an hour or so covering what we do everyday. Vents/gases, fluids/tube feeds, g-button/g-tube changes, skin care, ROM, etc. Question for question we both got 100%.

    Did I learn all that I needed to know in school? Did he? We will never know.
  7. 0
    Quote from Dixiedi
    Actually yes I am saying the LPNs from my school get more nursing education than the ADN nurses in my community, at least at that time. The hospital school of PN I went to no longer exsists so I have no way of judging any more. When I went to LPN school, there was also a community based school with an LPN program. I do not believe I could be convinced they got the same level of quality education I got.
    Sorry, but I don't think you are qualified to judge the RN program since you did not actually go through that program, or at least not all of it. It just doesn't make sense that the LPN program would contain more nursing education. I understand that in a BSN program there are some courses that are not totally nursing oriented. BSN grads get a more rounded education. You are entitled to your opinion, but that does not make it fact...especially since you did not go through both programs. I have. I was a LPN for 13 years. I was a good LPN. But I did learn some things in my RN program and was then qualified to take the RN boards.
    I am not trying to take away from any LPN's intelligence or ability to teach themselves by reading and going to training/inservices and giving the benefit of good experience as a teacher. Truth is, the education is not the same. The license is not the same. Good luck with your classes.
    Last edit by NursesRmofun on May 9, '04 : Reason: typo
  8. 0
    [QUOTE=NursesRmofun]Sorry, but I don't think you are qualified to judge the RN program since you did not actually go through that program, ...

    Isn't that part of the debate. Yes, we are thumping on that dead horse again. hehehe But it's all opinion. I have mine and I am entitled to it.
    I have worked many years and met many nurses. There are some at all stages of the licensing options that I wouldn't allow to change a cats' litter box. Others that I would trust my life with.

    You learn what you want to learn. The school and the license you are "qualified" to sit for can only judge what your minimum knowlege is.

    Thanks for seeing that!
  9. 0
    [QUOTE=Dixiedi]
    Quote from NursesRmofun
    Sorry, but I don't think you are qualified to judge the RN program since you did not actually go through that program, ...

    Isn't that part of the debate. Yes, we are thumping on that dead horse again. hehehe But it's all opinion. I have mine and I am entitled to it.
    I have worked many years and met many nurses. There are some at all stages of the licensing options that I wouldn't allow to change a cats' litter box. Others that I would trust my life with.

    You learn what you want to learn. The school and the license you are "qualified" to sit for can only judge what your minimum knowlege is.

    Thanks for seeing that!
    Yes. I think we can agree on some things! There are good and bad in every profession. And you do need to get certain education to qualify for the boards....which then test you for having at least a minimum knowledge base. But part of the debate (IMO) is really not if you, as a LPN, are qualified to judge a RN program when you haven't been through one....Not to me. I wouldn't expect a CNA or Med. tech. to legitimately critique a LPN program. If and when you are a RN, and you have gone through what you had to to get there...time, money, studying, and sweating it out, I think you will see that you did learn (even if just a little more than you thought you would) and you will see things differently. That is also my opinion. Haha. Best wishes! Who will get the last word? LOL! :chuckle
    Last edit by NursesRmofun on May 9, '04 : Reason: typo
  10. 0
    Quote from NursesRmofun
    ...... If and when you are a RN, and you have gone through what you had to to get there...time, money, studying, and sweating it out, I think you will see that you did learn (even if just a little more than you thought you would) and you will see things differently. That is also my opinion. Haha. Best wishes! Who will get the last word? LOL! :chuckle
    Only thing I disagree with there is ... I never have sweat it out. No reason to. Read it, do it. I am very lucky there. Got a brain like a trap. Yes, I know I am very lucky. I know many people who have had to study, study, study.
    I DO however have to sweat out the financing. Will I be able to come up with what I need when I need it... (3 college age boys) They are why I had to quit years ago when my first hubby died and I had to raise the boys alone.

    I will give to your opinion that until I have completed a course I can not fully judge that program. But... I won't give n the mathmatics. 2 9 month school years, nearly 1/2 spent in courses that may help with the nursing courses < 12 months in nursing courses.

    Have a great day, I have to get some laundry done... Reality.


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