dilemma, need advice...

  1. I got hired a retirement home but it seems that the census is huge, 86 and I am the only LPN on, no RN at night. The whole thing terrifies me for many reasons. I would like an opinion, I have not started yet, should I back out now or should I try it. I know that I will not stay if I find another job. I just think that this load is too much for a new grad. So my question is should I try it and look for another job or just pack it in. I don't think being at a job for a few weeks looks very good on a resume but who knows.
    Thanks for any advice.
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  2. 12 Comments

  3. by   jamangel
    what are your job duties? that is a lot for a new grad and alot more than most nurses would allow.
  4. by   moonchild20002000
    I really think that is too much for one nurse. There is no way I would accept that job and I have 33 years experience!
    Better to decline the job.
  5. by   pagandeva2000
    I'd run for the hills. But, if you know of any nurses that work there, consider asking them how they handle their jobs. The reason why I would run is out of a conversation that I had with one of the LPNs at my job (I am a new LPN as well...since June of this year).

    My friend told me that as a new grad, she worked at this agency that sent her to a unit where she was to medicate 40 demented patients. The RN was either unavailable or didn't help her, and the ID bands as well as photographs for over half of them were missing and because she didn't want to administer the wrong meds, she found herself still giving morning medications at 5:00 pm. She went to the RN and asked her what she should do, and the RN told her "Do what you have to" and my friend told me that she regretably wasted all of the narcartics, as well as the meds that were due all day, charted that she gave them and left...NEVER to return. Personally, I didn't judge her, because that was an impossible assignment for even a seasoned nurse, and therefore, she felt to protect the license that she worked so hard to get, and then decided to work elsewhere, where there were no situations like this. Some of these facilities claim that they want to care for their patients, but if they leave a desperate nurse to her own devices, who knows what can happen? I'd rather sleep at night than risk the saftey of the patients and lose what I worked so hard to acheive. This girl told me that in situations like this, nurses that have worked in such conditions do this regularly, and I don't want to be a nurse like that. It's a shame, because I am not sure if there is really a nursing shortage, or is it that many run from the bedside because of situations such as these or even worse.
  6. by   mel1213
    What shift are you working?? I don't know that i would accept all responsibility being a new grad. If there was someone there, perhaps another LPN that you can go to if you are not comfortable with something and need to ask a question, than maybe I would try it out. If i was left by myself for that many ppl, there is no way i would do it. I have been a nurse for a year and some months and i know i would not feel comfortable doing that. But depends on your job duties and the ppl you work with. And if you try it and dont like it, than there is always somewhere better. If you work for someone and dont like it doesnt mean that it will look bad with other facilities, as long as you give your two week notice.
    Good luck!
  7. by   tigger2sassy1
    In my honest opinion, I would advise you not to accept this position. It is way too much responsibility for one nurse, even a well seasoned one. If you got in trouble you would have no one to rely on as a back up. You worked too hard for your license and I would hate to see you lose it because of some facility trying to save money on labor. Check with your BON regarding staffing ratios. Good luck to you
  8. by   Pompom
    There is no way I would accept that job! That ratio of patients to totally unacceptable.
  9. by   feisty_lpn
    I would not accept a position with a nurse-patient ratio that high. The facility is obviously not considering the needs and safety of the patients... just dollar signs. With a ratio that high, the patients' safety and YOUR LICENSE is compromised. You worked too hard to get your license to risk it by working for that facility under those conditions.
  10. by   Darlene K.
    Look at this way.....In a 12 hour shift there are 720 minutes - divided by 86 residents = 8.3 minutes each. What was the question?
  11. by   foxxcat
    Welcome to the great world of NURSING
    is this a true assisted living?????? what shift 3-11 or 11-7
  12. by   JentheRN05
    run fast
  13. by   covu
    Quote from pagandeva2000
    I'd run for the hills. But, if you know of any nurses that work there, consider asking them how they handle their jobs. The reason why I would run is out of a conversation that I had with one of the LPNs at my job (I am a new LPN as well...since June of this year).

    My friend told me that as a new grad, she worked at this agency that sent her to a unit where she was to medicate 40 demented patients. The RN was either unavailable or didn't help her, and the ID bands as well as photographs for over half of them were missing and because she didn't want to administer the wrong meds, she found herself still giving morning medications at 5:00 pm. She went to the RN and asked her what she should do, and the RN told her "Do what you have to" and my friend told me that she regretably wasted all of the narcartics, as well as the meds that were due all day, charted that she gave them and left...NEVER to return. Personally, I didn't judge her, because that was an impossible assignment for even a seasoned nurse, and therefore, she felt to protect the license that she worked so hard to get, and then decided to work elsewhere, where there were no situations like this. Some of these facilities claim that they want to care for their patients, but if they leave a desperate nurse to her own devices, who knows what can happen? I'd rather sleep at night than risk the saftey of the patients and lose what I worked so hard to acheive. This girl told me that in situations like this, nurses that have worked in such conditions do this regularly, and I don't want to be a nurse like that. It's a shame, because I am not sure if there is really a nursing shortage, or is it that many run from the bedside because of situations such as these or even worse.
    What happened to the patient coming before all other things? How could this person sign out meds that she wasted? What about the effects on the patients? Yes 40 patients is alot to manage but it is managable. Been there and done it. Were there no cna's or anyone that could help identify the patients. Signing out patient medications and not giving them is not only illegal but what about patient harm?
  14. by   covu
    Dont take the position! That is ridiculous nurse/patient ratios. Keep looking and you'll find something that wont set you up for failure.

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