Co-worker not in the game

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    I work in LTC as a LPN. I have a co-worker who is a LPN too and is going for her RN BSN. I have heard from many if my other nurses she does not care about the residents. There had been times where she will not do a fall report, will not note orders, contact family or pharmacy. My self and some if my other nurses are getting tired if it should someone say something to our DON? It just seems like she just want the title and the money she does not have the heart. Not to mention the CNA hate her and she goes after them if they say something to her that she does not like.
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  3. 6 Comments so far...

  4. 1
    If you can't prove it, best to keep your self quiet. And remember co-workers are like family, you can;t pick your siblings. IF you have absolute proof then go to DON, but otherwise it makes you seem like one of those judgemental nurses who thinks she is better than another and usually it ends up with egg on your face. Remember there is a place for all personality types. There is a nurse I can';t stand, and she really does a poor job on alot of things, but she is more patient with some of our psych residents than I am, while I am the best at making sure all the i's are dotted and t's are crossed.
    nrsang97 likes this.
  5. 6
    NEWS FLASH: Not all nurses personally care about their patients/residents. Not all people join the nursing profession to help patients. Not all nurses display caring, compassion, empathy, professionalism, or respect for patients.

    Some people get into nursing solely for the paycheck. Others become nurses because the titles of 'RN' and 'LPN' carry more prestige and earning potential than the roles of the fast food worker, convenience store clerk, or hotel maid. Still, others join nursing without fully researching all that the career entails.

    My advice might not be popular or widely embraced, but I suggest you keep your concerns to yourself and mind your own business. Coworkers do not like people whom they view as 'snitches' and your work life might turn into a living hell if you report your coworker without having your ducks in a row.

    You need irrefutable proof before telling on someone, and then you still run the risk of the DON allowing this nurse to work there and continue her sloppy antics. Contrary to popular notions, many nurse managers know exactly how their employees work and which ones are prone to laziness and slacking off.
    Fiona59, NotFlo, conroenurse, and 3 others like this.
  6. 7
    When I note orders or contact pharmacy or complete a fall report, I'm not necessarily doing so because I care about the residents. I'm doing it because it's my job. There are many relatively "uncaring" (and what you describe as uncaring, I'd describe as reserved) people who are
    competent nurses and excellent at their job. And there are those who love the residents to death, but are totally incompetent and horrible nurses.

    Also, if this nurse is not completing fall reports or not noting orders, I am quite sure your DON is already well aware. What would the point be of you saying something? How is it any of your business? Are you her supervisor? Are you responsible for auditing her charting? If not, just stick to *your* job duties, and let your manager attend to this.
    Last edit by BrandonLPN on Jan 29, '13
    Fiona59, mailnurse1995, NotFlo, and 4 others like this.
  7. 0
    Quote from TheCommuter
    NEWS FLASH: Not all nurses personally care about their patients/residents. Not all people join the nursing profession to help patients. Not all nurses display caring, compassion, empathy, professionalism, or respect for patients.

    Some people get into nursing solely for the paycheck. Others become nurses because the titles of 'RN' and 'LPN' carry more prestige and earning potential than the roles of the fast food worker, convenience store clerk, or hotel maid. Still, others join nursing without fully researching all that the career entails.

    My advice might not be popular or widely embraced, but I suggest you keep your concerns to yourself and mind your own business. Coworkers do not like people whom they view as 'snitches' and your work life might turn into a living hell if you report your coworker without having your ducks in a row.

    You need irrefutable proof before telling on someone, and then you still run the risk of the DON allowing this nurse to work there and continue her sloppy antics. Contrary to popular notions, many nurse managers know exactly how their employees work and which ones are prone to laziness and slacking off.
    I completely agree, but also OP stated incident reports were not being filed. If charted in the progress notes, I would report that. Incident reports cover the team's butt.
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    While I agree with the overall message of "mind your own business".... I have to suggest you also need to mind YOUR patients...not hers. It's hard to watch a co-worker not do what is right when it comes to patient care but unless it DIRECTLY puts a patient in danger I wouldn't say anything but don't cover for her inadequacy either.
    I agree that supervisors are very aware of what goes on but often chooses the path of least resistance by doing nothing....or PAIRING a compassionate nurse with a not so compassionate nurse...kinda to even them out I guess. I see this often. A strong skilled nurse with a less skilled. A leader with a follower. A flighty one with a strong evidence based practice one.... you rarely see two strong nurses partnered...at least in what I've notice thus far.
  9. 0
    Thank you! Just found out she is quiting!


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