Are LPN's being Phased Out? - page 3

I have had other people tell me that going to school to become an lpn would be a waste of time because they are being phased out by CNAs. Is this true?... Read More

  1. by   BackfromRetirement
    When I started out as an LPN in 1986, this rumor was rampant. Most of the sources were RN's. Over the years a nursing shortage appeared and all of a sudden the hospital floors were manned with LPN's and one RN. My state does not recognize a med-aid certificate. I am now seeing more RN's in LTC than ever before. The place I work has multiple RN's on days and evenings, one RN on nights. Dr's office a famous for low-pay or no pay for both RN's and LPN's. Some pay 50 cents above minimum wage. As nurses we must stick together to avoid Corporations from trying to undercut us with non-licensed personnel just to save a buck. Join your state nursing association and keep abreast of the phony cost saving lobbyist and their efforts to undercut you. LPN's will always be around because they are cost effective, period.
  2. by   DogWmn
    This one always cracks me up. I graduated from PN school in 1972!:rckn:. I'm still here. I've been hearing the "phase out" for 38 years now. Uhhh we are still here. As many have said it depends on where you live more than anything else. LPN's are utilized in a plethera of settings - LTC, clinics, blood banks, dialysis, schools and on and on.

    We are in a "phase out" phase right now but as things change many hospitals will re-eval and find we are very cost effective.

    I have no interest in becoming an RN at this stage in my life, my ideal job is clinic nursing, not so great pay but lots of job satisfaction and really good hours.
  3. by   CrazierThanYou
    Quote from nursel56
    It's the RN-CNA-LPN Merry-Go-Round!

    Just a few thoughts on it-- I don't think that even if LPNs were phased out, they would be replaced by CNAs. I'm sure many people here will disagree, but the difference between a CNA and LPN is wider than the difference between an LPN and an RN. TThere is a mind-boggling array of different paths to a nursing career now, as well.

    A few factors to consider, the most important being

    * What type of nursing do you imagine yourself doing in 5 years?

    * How quickly do you need to be out there making a living?

    * How much debt are you able to take on through student loans?

    * Do you want to specialize?

    Getting the lowdown from a nursing guidance counselor is probably the best way to sort it all out, as well as the current laws and scopes of practice in the state you will be working in. As you can see from the prior posts, different areas are all over the place in the "phase out" map. This post below explains these differences well--



    If you check your state's scope of practice for LPNs, you will discover that LPNs are qualified to work in all areas of nursing, including ICU an ER, and in my state, the only thing RN-only is IV push meds. LPNs assess patients in LTCs and home health, as well. All of that doesn't mean you'll be hired, though. And with rising acuity levels, the learning curve is bumped up for RNs and LPNs-- rising acuity creates a steeper learning curve for everyone. Many hospitals these days are hiring BSN degree nurses only, for that reason.



    This depends on things like area, type of facility, years of experience, specialty, and whether or not you are supervising others.

    .
    This is a great question because if you are talking about the demand for nurses of all stripes, "in demand" is not how I would describe the field today. I hope it will be again very soon, but it's something to always keep current on. Best wishes to you!
    Okay, I have a question for you or anyone else who can answer it (although I'm sure it will differ according to state). I am just starting nursing school next month and I've never really been able to get clear on the difference between scope of practice for LPN vs. RN and have gotten false information. Example: I was told that LPN's can't start IV's but when I went to CNA clinicals, there was an LPN, starting an IV. So, that was obviously wrong.

    So, to get to my question, in an earlier post I said that I had been told that CNA's here in NC were going to be required to take CNA II, medication aide, and phlebotomy and would replace LPNs in order to lower costs. My question is: if a person had CNA I and II, medication aide, and phlebotomy, what are some things LPN's could do that CNAs couldn't. I have really been wondering about this.

    Thanks!
  4. by   EmmyBee
    Quote from angelcarmichael
    I have had other people tell me that going to school to become an lpn would be a waste of time because they are being phased out by CNAs. Is this true?
    Another thing you might want to do, is to go to the job websites and look up what's available for LPNs, in your area. That way you can see some of the positions being offered, and decided whether or not it is something you want to pursue.

    I became an LPN 14 years ago in the military. I have gained wonderful experience over the years (both in the military and out). I've worked in almost every area, be it ICU, emergency department, community health, school nursing, case management, chart review, long term care, and now hospice.

    The one thing I do wish though, is that I had finished my RN sooner for two reasons: more options and better pay. It took me a long time to get back on track and finally commit to it. But right now I have 14 months of my RN program behind me, and 5 more to go. I am surprised that it went so fast, and am excited to finally get finished.

    With that being said, no, I don't see LPNs being phased out, and no, it is not a waste of time. The only thing I do recommend, is that if you plan on advancing, try not to let too much time pass before you continue. Once you stop, it can be hard to get started again.

    Good luck in whatever you decide to do.
  5. by   Hospice Nurse LPN
    Quote from CrazierThanYou
    Okay, I have a question for you or anyone else who can answer it (although I'm sure it will differ according to state). I am just starting nursing school next month and I've never really been able to get clear on the difference between scope of practice for LPN vs. RN and have gotten false information. Example: I was told that LPN's can't start IV's but when I went to CNA clinicals, there was an LPN, starting an IV. So, that was obviously wrong.

    So, to get to my question, in an earlier post I said that I had been told that CNA's here in NC were going to be required to take CNA II, medication aide, and phlebotomy and would replace LPNs in order to lower costs. My question is: if a person had CNA I and II, medication aide, and phlebotomy, what are some things LPN's could do that CNAs couldn't. I have really been wondering about this.

    Thanks!

    I'd suggest reading YOUR STATES Nurse Practice Act. That is where you'll get accurate info for YOU.
  6. by   Prado
    Just think there are millions of LVN... Government will think 100 times ,before they phase out...
  7. by   realnursealso/LPN
    Quote from angelcarmichael
    I'm new to this site and am not on here every single day so I don't know what questions people are asking. I did not know that other people asked this question numerous of times before. Like I said, I am new here and just trying to find out is this field still in demand before I waste my time and money investing into this field.
    Sorry if I came across as harsh. The point of my statement was that I get very frustrated with people who don't have a clue, saying LPN"S are being phazed out. I've been an LPN for 30 years and it seems that every year around the time that new classes are graduated from nursing school this question comes up. Nothing is being mentioned by the BON in my state about LPN's being done away with. So idle chatter being written by people who don't know what they are talking about really fries me! My nooooooooo, had to do with someone trying to discourage yet another person to not become an LPN. The next time someone tries to tell you that, ask them where they got the information. People can speak to what is going on in their place of employment, but not what all the BOARDS OF NURSING, are doing or planning. Welcome new future nurse. I wish you well and hope you have a wonderful career in the nursing field.
  8. by   Fribblet
    Quote from realnursealso/LPN
    Sorry if I came across as harsh. The point of my statement was that I get very frustrated with people who don't have a clue, saying LPN"S are being phazed out. I've been an LPN for 30 years and it seems that every year around the time that new classes are graduated from nursing school this question comes up. Nothing is being mentioned by the BON in my state about LPN's being done away with. So idle chatter being written by people who don't know what they are talking about really fries me! My nooooooooo, had to do with someone trying to discourage yet another person to not become an LPN. The next time someone tries to tell you that, ask them where they got the information. People can speak to what is going on in their place of employment, but not what all the BOARDS OF NURSING, are doing or planning. Welcome new future nurse. I wish you well and hope you have a wonderful career in the nursing field.
    It really matters more what the places who are hiring people are doing. The BON has no say over who gets hired and who doesn't at a particular job.

    So what the BONs are doing or planning really doesn't matter. What does matter is that a lot of hospitals are phasing out LPNs. For instance, my hospital has told all LPNs to get their RN or get out.

    Does that mean there are no LPN jobs anywhere in the country? No. But there are lot of places that are pushing them out, and it's a legitimate concern for anyone considering becoming an LPN.

    Frankly OP, the biggest job market for LPNs is in LTC. Considering you can get associate's degree and become an RN, that's what I would do, but that's just me.
  9. by   SuesquatchRN
    Quote from Fribblet
    It really matters more what the places who are hiring people are doing. The BON has no say over who gets hired and who doesn't at a particular job.
    Actually, that is incorrect. The NYS BON has declared that LPNs in LTC cannot touch a PICC line, period. That means that we must have an RN on all shifts if we have anyone running an IV since we only rarely admit people with peripheral lines. Even in LTC, once the domain of LPNs, the BON is limiting their practice.

    That said, we are still hiring LPNs, and a good thing, too, but your opportunities as an LPN are limited in NYS.
  10. by   happy2learn
    LPN's are being phased out of hospitals in my state, but they rule the LTC's. The only LPN's that work in hospitals where I am have been there forever, they have not been hiring LPN's for a few years. The only LPN jobs are available in LTC's.

    There's no way a CNA would ever be able to do the job of an LPN on top of what they already do.
  11. by   Fribblet
    Quote from AlmostABubbieRN
    Actually, that is incorrect. The NYS BON has declared that LPNs in LTC cannot touch a PICC line, period. That means that we must have an RN on all shifts if we have anyone running an IV since we only rarely admit people with peripheral lines. Even in LTC, once the domain of LPNs, the BON is limiting their practice.

    That said, we are still hiring LPNs, and a good thing, too, but your opportunities as an LPN are limited in NYS.
    Good point. The BON can influence the job market by limiting or expanding a nurse's practice. Regardless though, it seems the trends in many hospitals in many states is to phase them out.

    Unrelated question: It was my understanding that an RN was present on every shift in most LTC facilities. My understanding however is based on very limited experience. Am I wrong?
  12. by   SuesquatchRN
    Quote from Fribblet
    Unrelated question: It was my understanding that an RN was present on every shift in most LTC facilities. My understanding however is based on very limited experience. Am I wrong?
    Depends on the state. NY requires, I think, 8 hours a day, but NY does not permit LPNs to assess after a fall, etc, so it becomes moot. We try to staff for an RN on all shifts because otherwise the DON has to get up in the middle of the night to go in while the resident stays on the floor until she gets there.
  13. by   Fribblet
    Quote from AlmostABubbieRN
    Depends on the state. NY requires, I think, 8 hours a day, but NY does not permit LPNs to assess after a fall, etc, so it becomes moot. We try to staff for an RN on all shifts because otherwise the DON has to get up in the middle of the night to go in while the resident stays on the floor until she gets there.
    Seriously? You have to leave a resident on the floor until they can be assessed by an RN? Wow.

    The results of politicking at its finest.

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