All Lpn's Please Read - page 5

Hello, My 226 bed acute care hospital has formed a committee as we are going to re-introduce LPN's on the med-surg floors. The committee is looking at how we are going to utilize the LPN's. ... Read More

  1. by   pagandeva2000
    Quote from nurse-lou
    Hello,

    My 226 bed acute care hospital has formed a committee as we are going to re-introduce LPN's on the med-surg floors. The committee is looking at how we are going to utilize the LPN's.

    SO, would you please tell me--if you work in a hospital--what exactly your duties are and what you as an LPN are and aren't allowed to do. I realize that the LPN/LVN scope of practice varies by state, I am in Northeast Ohio.

    I am specifically interested in Nurse- patient ratio for the LPN in your facility and any other infor mation you can provide will be helpful.

    Personally, I am looking forward to working side by side with the LPN's and feel that it was a grave mistake that a lot of hospitals--especially in this area of the country-that they were phased out of the acute care setting.

    Thank you for your help!

    Kelly
    I live in New York, and the med-surg units have LPNs administer medications, do piggybacks and fingersticks. They have pulled them away from primary care. Most LPNs have about 10-15 patients, but are only medicating them. No nursing notes unless extremely necessary. Some of the LPNs may assist the RN with dressings, suctioning, tube feedings and catheter insertion and care once they complete their assignments, if they feel like it, but most don't because they are bitter that the RNs may have 3 to 5 patients to the LPNs 10 to 15, and unfortunately, my experience showed me that many of the RNs were not giving their medications to the patients on a timely basis.
    I work in Ambulatory Care, but did 6 weeks in med-surg first. I considered doing overtime in med-surg, but since most of my skills may be lost anyway, I hadn't really bothered.
  2. by   duffy29
    I appreciate your letter. I am LPN now living in Savannah,GA. And after 30yrs in CA,I am now being told that I can do it all,but push IV meds. I am mixing meds,giving meds via PICC,hanging piggybacks,etc,etc. Needless to say all this is not in my scope for CA. I am in career shock,and trying to adjust to this transistion.Not to mention I have had no offical training here as yet. I thank God that CA has it's standards. Well,I have been doing a long time.I've been thrown in there many a day,so,it's sink or sail,once again I suppose.And,I suppose I'll sail. thank You.
  3. by   brendamyheart
    Quote from LynniNurse
    Well Grey, you need to realize that different states have different laws concerning the scope of practice for nurses. In this state, it is legal for an LPN to push drugs in accordance with the policy of the facility.

    Then you need to get off of your judgemental horse and quit making assumptions! I don't lie about what I do. I'm a competent and well trained professional and I and my team have saved many lives. And if you want, you too can move to this state and do all the same things I do.

    And in my most professional voice you my dear, can BITE ME!
    Well said!!
  4. by   brendamyheart
    Quote from GreytNurse
    All I can say is, you all better be double checking the standards for what you can do, legally, with the state. There are National regulations and I'm just glad I don't work with some of you.....sounds too scary!
    All good nurses regardless of there title should know their scope of practice!!
    It varies sate to state. Do you know all the nurses scope of practice from state to state??
  5. by   debdeb07
    I WORK IN GREENSBORO , NC AT A HOSPITAL AND THE LPN'S HERE DO EVERYTHING EXCEPT CENTRAL LINE CARE , THE IV TEAM DOES THAT , EVEN THE RN'S ON THE FLOOR DON'T DO THOSE. WE DON'T DO THE INITIAL ASSESSMENT ON PATIENTS, WE DO PUSH MEDS , BUT THERE ARE SOME THAT WE DON'T, AND WE DO HANG BLOOD WITH A RN AND MONITOR IT. LPN'S IN THE HOSPITAL SETTING ARE JUST AS EFFECTIVE AS THE RN , AND WHEN THERE IS TEAM NURSING IT MAKES BOTH JOBS GO A LOT SMOOTHER , IT ALSO CUTS DOWN ON STAFF OVERLOAD. I HAVE BEEN NURSING 20 YEARS NOW AND HAVE NEVER SEEN SO MUCH DRAMA OVER THE LPN VS RN ROLE AS I HAVE IN THE LAST FEW YEARS. WE ARE ALL NURSES , AT LEAST THAT'S WHAT EACH STATE BOARD OF NURSING SAYS. OUR PRIMARY AND MAIN GOAL IS PATIENT CARE , AND THAT'S WHERE OUR FOCUS SHOULD BE. EVERYONE HAS A JOB DESCRIPTION , BUT IN THE END IT IS THE CAREOF THE PATIENT THAT MATTERS. SORRY TO HAVE GOTTNEN OFF TRACK , BUT WE PRIMARILY DO THE SAME THINGS ON THE FLOOR EXCEPT FOR THOSE FEW THINGS ,BY THE WAY I WORK ON A TELEMETRY FLOOR. I ALSO HAVE PRACTICED IN VA , AND IT'S PRETTY MUCH THE SAME THERE TOO.
  6. by   Lovin' my job!
    Hey all

    I'm an LPN in Vancouver, BC. I started nursing in Alberta where, in the LTC I worked in we were utilized at full scope. Meds, IMs/SQs, admissions, everything. At the acute care I worked. I did care. O2 therapy, wounds, admissions. That's it! Boring for the most part. I was paired with an RN who ran around doing meds, hanging IVs etc. We were responsible for 6 - 9 pts. I am aware that there were some units at the hospital that allowed LPNs to use there full scope though. Nah, LTC is the place for me!
  7. by   Sandi0302
    WOW...I am an LPN in NJ, and you guys have it MADE. In NJ they are pretty much pushing all LPN's out of hospitals, although i did see an ad in the paper for a hospital hiring them. The hospital that I worked in as an aide wasnt hiring LPNs anymore, and the one's they did have they paid them $8/hr less than RN's.
    When I worked in a sub-acute facility, we did almost everything the RN did except be charge and do IV-pushes. I am IV certified. My desire becoming a nurse was to work in a hospital and challenge myself. I don't feel challenged working in an assisted living facility. NJ sucks
  8. by   lpnQT25
    Fellow North Easterner... I am an LPN & live in far NE corner...I work at a county hospital and I believe they have staffed LPN's for the last 6-7 years. I do everything but hang blood and IV pushes... we team nurse , with an RN.. so I go to her for all my pushes & such... we both have approx. 6-7 patients depending on the census. our unit has 28 beds I believe and our other med-surg wing has 34.. we usually have 4 nurses... two LPN and two RN... & two NA. So far I like this set up.. I haven't been here along time but... time will tell. Are you east of cleveland? I only know of a few hospitals this side of cleveland that don't staff LPN's at present time. Good Luck!
  9. by   ER_RN07
    Hi, I'm an LPN in the ED. As LPN's we work fast track which functions as both an actual fast track and ED overflow. We also work GYN/PSYCH and Halls if needed in the Main ED. Once our renovation is complete we will also work in ED OBS.
    In the past year ALL LPN's (with more than 1 yr experience as an LPN and after taking a class given by the hospital) can push IV meds, the meds you can push are department specific. In my department NO cardiac meds, Moderate Sedation etc. However in the GI station LPN's do Moderate Sedation all day long! We are allowed to take v.o & t.o's, can hang blood as long as an RN checks the blood with us (policy is 2 nurses must check the blood and one HAS to be an RN). We are not allowed to sit triage but we have occasionaly triaged rescue patients (I always have my charge nurse co-sign my rescue patients triage). We can mix iv's, abx, bananna bags. We do NOT do anything with central lines, do not access ports (though I have been told they can do this on the floors my CNS says no which is fine with me.) The only IM med we can not give is Methotrexate.
    And finally as of about 3 months ago they (ED managment) decided that it is going to now be mandatory that we take ACLS.
  10. by   Nurse`Chief~Chickie
    sooo, back to the topic, i'm an lpn in mo.
    we can't push iv meds, initiate blood, but once the bag is spiked, we are responsible for the admin and monitoring. we can admin ivpb to picc lines, but can't access cl for blood or flush with heparin. i work med surg, we have an rn charge nurse, and lpns are team leaders for up to 8 pts. there are rns and lpns both on the floor as team leaders. rns are only responsible for our ivps or spiking our blood. we take orders, call drs, start ivs.....we are quite in charge of our pts. the rns do not have to check and sign our charts. we do our own admits and discharges. it seems odd to me that some of you are working in places that basically requires being baby-sat. some places just aren't up to date i guess.
  11. by   G1G12001
    Iwork in an outpatient pediatric clinic in Tennessee. The LPNs do everything from triaging the patient to giving injections,start and stop IV fluids,administer oral medications and doing basic vision/hearing checks, and phlebotomy procedures. Our office has 1 RN, 3LPNs ,and 1MA. The only thing the RN does is push IV pain meds and monitor conscious sedations. My primary supervisor is also an LPN.
  12. by   4NURSEC
    I am a LPN in northeast ohio, and I work on a MED/SURG unit. Basically I do everythng the rn does, but give blood, and IV pushes. I do IV's, take orders, and new admit assessments. I work for a big hosp. and they tried to get rid of us, but they soon found out they needed us. On the rare occassion that my floor is over staffed the RN will be sent home before me. So LPNs are very important to the acute setting I feel as though we deflect some of the tension off the rn. For example if the pt is a total, but gets Q2 hr pain med at least she can give the medicine, as oppose to listening to the whinning and having to completely handle a total care pt.
  13. by   navvet
    Did someone get their feelings hurt here?

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All Lpn's Please Read