Afraid to work as LPN

  1. I graduated salutatorian of my class and received my license a month ago but still haven't started the job process. Do I go through an agency? Seems only LTC facilities are available that pay well. I'm tiny and I don't think the CNAs would be cooperative at all. Plus don't think I know much about nursing.
    Many insight or guidance would greatly help!
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  2. Visit Tenzee1992 profile page

    About Tenzee1992

    Joined: Mar '18; Posts: 1
    Specialty: 1 year(s) of experience

    5 Comments

  3. by   Ruby Vee
    Quote from Tenzee1992
    I graduated salutatorian of my class and received my license a month ago but still haven't started the job process. Do I go through an agency? Seems only LTC facilities are available that pay well. I'm tiny and I don't think the CNAs would be cooperative at all. Plus don't think I know much about nursing.
    Many insight or guidance would greatly help!
    As a new grad, agency work is probably not the best choice. You'll want to get a good orientation on a floor where you can get to know the staff, figure out where things are, understand and develop a routine, learn the protocols and procedures . . . all of that is difficult (if not impossible) to learn if you're randomly popping in and out of this floor or that. So apply at LTC. You'll learn an awful lot there, and you'll make the transition from student to nurse. Speaking as a preceptor, no one expects you to know all that much about nursing -- a license is more of a "learner's permit" than anything else.

    Treat the CNAs well and as the important team members they are, and you'll have no problems getting cooperation.
  4. by   chuckinchicago
    Good suggestion!!!
  5. by   arudesea
    Quote from Tenzee1992
    I graduated salutatorian of my class and received my license a month ago but still haven't started the job process. Do I go through an agency? Seems only LTC facilities are available that pay well. I'm tiny and I don't think the CNAs would be cooperative at all. Plus don't think I know much about nursing.
    Many insight or guidance would greatly help!
    To be honest, almost no one knows much about nursing when they first graduate. Like the other poster said, a License is more of a learning permit. The right LTC will provide you invaluable experience as a new nurse. From time management to basic patient care, it really is a great place to start. As far as CNA cooperation, once you have a bit of a routine down help them. I got so much respect and cooperation from CNA's when I showed them that I can help them when they help me. Good luck to you and congratulations on graduating and passing your boards!
  6. by   Alex Egan
    Yea. So be warned this isn't going to be super encouraging.

    You're a new grad. There is a reason employers prefer experience. As a new nurse you don't know what you don't know. In climbing the mountain that was nursing school you often don't see the Everest that is your first year. The quickest way to get where you want to go is to consider this an extra year of school.

    So what job to get...well you get the one you can get. You're not in a position to be overly selective. Don't fall into the trap of thinking that getting a particular kind of job will wreck your future career goals. Frankly a nurse with a year of any experience is gonna be head and shoulders over a new grad. So your goal is to find any job.

    That being said, avoid agency work. Agency nurses are mercenaries. They are paid a premium to solve problems not create them. They are expected to show up function with little to no support and be near flawless.

    As an LPN it's most likely going to be long term care. Negotiate for extended orientation three weeks instead of two. Ask to orient on all shifts and units. Get a wide view of the job and in addition to getting the basics, select the work habits in your preceptors that work best for you. Take notes, and ask questions. Be attentive and nice. Your not only learning your buliding a support network for if you end up in the weeds.

    Realize that you are going to have a bad time. It takes 3-6 months to get anywhere near comfortable.

    Get that year and then start looking for a better job if you like. Correction look for that perfect job, never stop looking, but only move from that first job before the year mark if you are 1000% sure that you are moving for a better opportunity and will stay at the new job for a year plus. Even then stay PRN at job 1. Job hopping is the opposite of experience. It is a career killer
  7. by   Mrsmqjones8
    I would suggest starting at a LTC. Speaking from a nurse who worked at a LTC facility while in nursing school, your CNA's are your lifeline and most of the nurses are helpful and patient because they remember being a newbie!! When you show them you're a team player and not the nurse that sits on the sidelines, you will have a great team from jump no matter if you work in a hospital, LTC or Home Health. I transitioned from nursing student to nurse with very little difficulty. My CNA's would do anything for me because they knew I was a nurse that cared deeply for my residents as well as my team. Learn from everyone! Most of the ppl (all staff members) you will be working with are caring individuals and you can learn something from them all. Even the not so nice ones!

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