$12 an hour?! - page 6

I used to work at a nursing home in Food Services (supervising staff cafeteria), and I went back to visit and get my face out there again. My aunt is an LPN there, and I went upstairs to say hello... Read More

  1. by   bsnecu99
    I read with dismay your posting. You were lamenting making $12/hr as a new LPN? I started working at the local megahospital chain here in NC as a new RN/BSN/BA for $15.23/hr. At the time our rent was $475 for a 1.5 bedroom college apartment. There is tax on food, tax every year on your car, car insurance is vulgarly high, and our county tax is 7% and climbing. We are #49/50 in the country's worse schools. Need I say more? Well, try this. After working three years, Beverly Nursing Home offered me $12/hr. So what are you bellyaching over? Sheesh! I'd trade places with you in a minute! :angryfire P.S. I still owe over five thousand dollars on my student loan for this degree!
  2. by   catkellydr
    Instead of being upset that a LVN/LPN may make more than you, perhaps you should move from your economically depressed area! You are correct, with your credentials you should be making at least half again as much for starting out. Check out some other areas to practice in! As for LVN/LPN pay, take what they offer to get your feet wet! Nursing is a great career, and regardless of the licensure, it is a field that needs more people working in it that care and want to be there! Keep your chin up, go to school.
    Last edit by catkellydr on Jul 10, '04
  3. by   elnino4
    As soon as you get your licence move out of Rochester (if you dont have any ties) and come to Los Angeles Ca,. I make on one registry $26.00 per hour /40hrs per/12hrs q3days, and $23.00 per hr @ a rehab hospital 40hrs per week/ 8hrs 5days. I dont mean to brag or show you a pie in the sky, but sweetie im not feeling the poverty line.
    Rochester is good if you want to work for $ 12.00 per hr. But if you want to make some real money come to california. Relocate! you are still very young!!!!!!!
    OOOPS! DID I MENTION I WAS A NEW GRAD???
  4. by   bsnecu99
    Quote from catkellydr
    Instead of being upset that a LVN/LPN may make more than you, perhaps you should move from your economically depressed area! You are correct, with your credentials you should be making at least half again as much for starting out. Check out some other areas to practice in! As for LVN/LPN pay, take what they offer to get your feet wet! Nursing is a great career, and regardless of the licensure, it is a field that needs more people working in it that care and want to be there! Keep your chin up, go to school.
    If I had it to do all over again, I would definitely go for the LPN. One year, and you are out and working. Instead of taking four years and tens of thousands of dollars, not to mention four years out of the work force - I would NEVER do that again. Especially after graduating and finding out that the LPN and BSN make very similar wages. I went out to several places this week seeking work (there is NO shortage here, believe that), I was told more than once 'too bad you aren't an LPN 'cause that's what we're really looking for.' If you want a diploma on your wall to cover up a crack in the plaster, then I say go for the BSN. If your plaster is OK, then don't do it.
  5. by   RN4NICU
    Quote from elnino4
    As soon as you get your licence move out of Rochester (if you dont have any ties) and come to Los Angeles Ca,. I make on one registry $26.00 per hour /40hrs per/12hrs q3days, and $23.00 per hr @ a rehab hospital 40hrs per week/ 8hrs 5days. I dont mean to brag or show you a pie in the sky, but sweetie im not feeling the poverty line.
    Rochester is good if you want to work for $ 12.00 per hr. But if you want to make some real money come to california. Relocate! you are still very young!!!!!!!
    OOOPS! DID I MENTION I WAS A NEW GRAD???
    Yes, but the cost of living in LA is obscene.
  6. by   RN4NICU
    Quote from bsnecu99
    If I had it to do all over again, I would definitely go for the LPN. One year, and you are out and working. Instead of taking four years and tens of thousands of dollars, not to mention four years out of the work force - I would NEVER do that again. Especially after graduating and finding out that the LPN and BSN make very similar wages. I went out to several places this week seeking work (there is NO shortage here, believe that), I was told more than once 'too bad you aren't an LPN 'cause that's what we're really looking for.' If you want a diploma on your wall to cover up a crack in the plaster, then I say go for the BSN. If your plaster is OK, then don't do it.
    That is so weird because the hospital I work in does not even use LPNs. I can't believe hospitals in your area are turning down RNs! Unreal!
  7. by   elnino4
    I remember when I was not a nurse and I pretty much had to settle for what ever a potential employer decided I was worth. I studied Telecommunications for one year and a half and recieved a certificate that I thought would carry some respect. Well it takes a fool to learn! That is a field where if you dont know the right people............ forget about it. Twelve dollars per hour is what you better get used to. So I did that for about 5 years and learned alot; still to this day I can do anything as it relates to that field. Eventhough I never made a wage above 17 per hr the work of helping big companies with their phone system just wasn't humanatarian enough. After 5 years of working at AoL Time Warner in upstate New York, I had to move back home because my mother was partialy paralyzed and had to have 2 surgeries to repair her defect. Well something came out of me ...... it was like my destiny to do this kind of work. To make a long story short I became a nurse to really make a difference, eventhough the money is fantastic if you care about people and treat them with dignity and respect you will go very far in this profession. God has blessed me through helping people, to help myself and my family. So in summary do your best and you will be rewarded.

    HE'S WATCHING OVER US!!!!!
  8. by   mounceb
    undefined
    Quote from kiyasmom
    I used to work at a nursing home in Food Services (supervising staff cafeteria), and I went back to visit and get my face out there again. My aunt is an LPN there, and I went upstairs to say hello to her and I overheard two ladies on the elevator talking about the "sucky" paychecks they just received and thank God for the upcoming holiday pay. I told one lady I was starting my LPN program in a matter of weeks and she gave me a sympathetic look and said "You may as well get a management position at McDonald's or spend the next year at RBI getting your medical assistant certification. You'll make more." Word for word. (BTW, RBI [Rochester Business Institute] is a business college that accepts EVERYONE and certifies ANYONE). I asked the lady if she were serious and the other lady said "Unless you get in here or at St. John's Home you will be making about $12 an hour with minimal diffs, and it's not much more here to be honest."

    I am mortified. I thought for sure we made closer to $17. That additional $5 an hour could really help this family get from under the "poverty line".

    Any insight? Could this be true?

    I work at a rural regional hospital in Louisiana as an LPN and make 13.00 per hour with 2.00 shift diff and 2.00 weekend diff. It is fair pay in these parts where the cost of living is pretty low. I could make considerably more elsewhere in a larger city but the cost of living and crime would offset it too much. We pay better than most any hospital in our area but the LTC facilities pay slightly more... for those who can tolerate that environment.
  9. by   renge1
    Kiyasmom,

    I had the same situation myself. In 2000 I relocated from Denver, Co to Atlanta, Ga. My first application/job interview was at LTC. Durning the interview the D.O.N. was looking at my application from previous work places and made the comment..."I can tell you right now we don't pay that"! And before I could get it out to ask her what she did pay......she stated $12.00.
    I was floored!!!!!!! I had been an LPN for 5 years at that time. I could not believe it, I had to ask, your kidding right? (totally inappropiate for an interview, but I was so shocked!) She stated no, all our LPN make 12hr, doesn't matter how long you've been an LPN......I just could not belive it, I did not even get 12hr as a new grad in 1995. One is lucky in GA to get 15-16 these days depending which LTC one is working. And I get the spill all the time well the "cost of living" is less.....I will have to disagree with that......So just kind of consider all things, and think of why you want to be in the field, is it for money or to help/care for the sick. I do understand that at the same time you have a family to support....we all do, best of luck to you.
  10. by   HisTreasure
    [QUOne is lucky in GA to get 15-16 these days depending which LTC one is working. And I get the spill all the time well the "cost of living" is less.....I will have to disagree with that[/QUOTE]

    I've lived in Atlanta, Stone Mountain and Conyers to be exact. I KNOW the cost of living is high. I have never lived in Denver, so I couldn't compare in that aspect...but even after moving back to New York, the little things here (like gas) are more expensive than ATL, but the big things (like utilities: phone, cable, gas, electric, even rent) is more in ATL. Hmmm...

    I re-read my post and I sound really shallow. It's not intentional, it's the reality of having a family and financial responsibilities. Not to mention being tired of being poor. Know what though? Upon really looking at why I am going into nursing: It's for the care of the people.

    If I only make $30,000 a year it doesn't immediately matter. I gave my life to Christ yesterday, and I know that this is where He would have me to be, and this is what he would have me do. Why else would I, a person with no medical background and three children under 3 get one of 80 spots, when there were 100s of other (perhaps more "qualified") people who could have gotten my slot? ~700 people tested, ~400 people qualified and interviewed, 170 applications went before the board for final selection. 84 were chosen.

    I do have my husband, and with his income we should be fine (at least better off than we are now) until I get my RN. In the meantime, I will enjoy my time as an LPN and LPN student.
  11. by   ProfRN4
    Quote from kiyasmom
    I overheard two ladies on the elevator talking about the "sucky" paychecks they just received and thank God for the upcoming holiday pay. I told one lady I was starting my LPN program in a matter of weeks and she gave me a sympathetic look and said "You may as well get a management position at McDonald's or spend the next year at RBI getting your medical assistant certification. You'll make more." Word for word. (BTW, RBI [Rochester Business Institute] is a business college that accepts EVERYONE and certifies ANYONE). I asked the lady if she were serious and the other lady said "Unless you get in here or at St. John's Home you will be making about $12 an hour with minimal diffs, and it's not much more here to be honest."

    I am mortified. I thought for sure we made closer to $17. That additional $5 an hour could really help this family get from under the "poverty line".

    Any insight? Could this be true?
    Just curious, but what do nursing assistants, or 'student' nurses (working as NAs) make in your area? The reason I ask, is because I noticed that you plan to get your Associates degree within a year after you graduate. Why are you bothering with the LPN? I am often curious as to why people take that road, rather than just going to RN school. Also, where I live, the only place a new LPN can get a job is in a nursing home. You could work as a NA/Student while you go to school, since the pay for LPNs is so poor.
  12. by   Betty_SPN_KS
    I'm starting with a base pay of $12, plus shift differential. My DON said that's a little more than I would get if I hadn't worked as a CNA at the same facility for a while. This is a small town and I didn't expect more than that here (although there are homes in small towns that pay much more than that). But I'm only a 5 minute drive from work, so I won't complain for now. I think a hospital in a larger city an hour drive away starts LPNs at about $10.50 an hour.
  13. by   HisTreasure
    Quote from bonemarrowrn
    Just curious, but what do nursing assistants, or 'student' nurses (working as NAs) make in your area? The reason I ask, is because I noticed that you plan to get your Associates degree within a year after you graduate. Why are you bothering with the LPN? I am often curious as to why people take that road, rather than just going to RN school. Also, where I live, the only place a new LPN can get a job is in a nursing home. You could work as a NA/Student while you go to school, since the pay for LPNs is so poor.
    Mostly it is necessity. It is not feasible for me to go the traditional route because it would take me 3+ years to even get into the AS program. As a wife and mother, I don't have that type of time. I can work as an LPN and gain clinical experience, and I believe that most people who do start as LPNs and build on that experience make excellent nurses. They know how to relate to LPNs and CNAs when they do finally become RNs, because they know how it feels to be in that role, along with all the things that come with the title of CNA/LPN. With an LPN, there are a couple of bridge programs I can attend after I graduate, most of them are accelerated. Also, I can choose to do distance route if I land a good job.
    I can work in LTC, Assisted Living, Hospitals, Home Health, schools, doctor's offices ect.
    I am proud to be an LPN student, even if the pay is not wonderful. This is where God will have me to be, and I truly believe I will be a great nurse no matter what letters I have behind my name. :spin:

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