Nurse Licensure Compact

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    I was wondering if anyone has anything that they have experienced negatively when exercising their compact privileges. Our state hasn't become a compact state as of yet. There is talk about Louisiana possibly joining, and I would love some first- hand knowledge- good and bad. Thanks!
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    Post moved for more responses.

    Suebird3
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    I may sound clueless, but what are compact priveleges?
    tettehnurse likes this.
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    I personally think the nurse licensure compact is a good idea. I also live in Louisiana. I don't think we will be joining it anytime soon. The LSNA, as well as the BON is very much against it.
    Senator Schindler proposed a bill during the last legislative session and it died on the floor after a "closed door" meeting with members from LSNA and the BON.
    I also think had we been a member of the compact during the hurricanes last year we would not have taken so much time to get nurses from other states here to help us out. Once the Governor declared our state an emergency disaster area she signed a bill allowing nurses from other states to come in without all of the required paper work from the BON. It was a mess!
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    Most of the states who have no desire to join the Nursing Compact feel this way because the BONs of non-compact states tend to net more money via more fees charged. It's all about the money.

    If Louisiana joins the Nursing Compact, they'll lose money. Currently, anyone who wants to endorse into Louisiana has to pay hundreds of dollars to the BON. The state wants to keep the money rolling in.
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    The above poster is definitely correct in my opinion. But there is much more to it than that. Some states do not require criminal background checks, as Louisiana does, so they feel we may be getting some less than desirable nurses into our state through the compact.

    If you want to know more about the politics and pros and cons of the compact send me a pm and I will forward you a paper I did on this subject for a healthcare mgmt course.
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    Quote from brnurse
    i may sound clueless, but what are compact priveleges?
    this was taken from the texas bon site, so i guess it would be the same for all compact states.

    how would you like your texas nursing license to be similar to your texas driver's license, enabling you to practice nursing throughout the country with your home state license, just as you can drive throughout the country with your texas driver's license? well, times are changing, and a few states have moved toward allowing a rn and lvn license from one state to serve as a privilege to practice nursing in other states. the legislation, passed in texas and other states and known as the nurse licensure compact (compact), serves as an agreement among states to mutually recognize each others' licensees. these states who have adopted the compact are referred to as party states.
    as the compact legislation becomes effective, the party states will begin to recognize a single nurse license rather than the cumbersome practice of obtaining duplicative licenses for each state where a nurse practices. mutual recognition of a license increases nurse mobility and facilitates delivery of health care by innovative communication practices such as telenursing. additionally, the compact will better promote the public health and safety by encouraging cooperative efforts among the party states in nurse licensing and regulation. as more state legislatures enact the nurse licensure compact the number of party states will increase and the nation will move closer to allowing one home state license to grant a nursing privilege nationwide.
    it is important that texas nurse's understand multistate licensure because texas is one of the first states to enact it and will be at the front of this innovation in regulation in the new millennium.
    in order to enjoy the multistate licensing privilege, the compact requires that the nurse be licensed in the party state in which he/she permanently resides. this license is known as a home state license. the nurse must meet the criteria of their home state law to obtain and retain the home state license. with the home state license, the nurse may practice in any other party state without obtaining any additional licenses. a nurse practicing in another party state pursuant to the multistate privilege must comply with the state practice laws of the state in which the patient is located at the time care is given. compact states where a nurse practices using a multistate privilege are known as remote states.
    a nurse in a party state can hold a home state license in only one party state at a time. if a nurse changes permanent residence from one party state to another party state then the nurse must relinquish licensure in the previous state of residence and apply for, and meet the requirements for licensure, in the new home state. the compact does allow a nurse to apply for a new home state license prior to moving. further, the nurse may move back to their previous party state and re-establish licensure or move to another party state and apply for licensure there.
    when a nurse moves to a state which has not enacted or does not recognize the compact, the previous home state license converts to a license valid in only the former home state and does not entitle the nurse to a multistate privilege in other party states.
    a nurse practicing in a remote state will be subject to the nursing practice laws and regulations of that remote party state. the nurse must know and conform to the laws, rules and regulations affecting his/her practice in the remote party state. if a nurse violates the nursing practice act (npa), the remote state may discipline a nurse practicing under a multistate licensing privilege. although a remote party state may not directly effect a home state license, it may revoke or restrict the nurse's multistate privilege to practice nursing within its own state boundaries. additionally, the home state may also take disciplinary action for a violation which occurred in a remote state. in other words, any party state can issue a disciplinary order against a multistate privilege and restrict the nurse's practice within its party state borders, but only the state of residence (the home state) can discipline a license. administrative procedures according to individual state law, including due process rights of a nurse, will apply to disciplinary action by any party state on a multistate license or privilege.
    it should also be noted that the compact creates a shared information system which enhances the party states' ability to monitor nursing practice to protect public health and safety. the compact creates a coordinated licensure information system called nursys which will include information on the licensing and disciplinary history of each nurse. each party state must timely report any adverse disciplinary action against a home state license or a multistate privilege. the party states must also submit information on any current significant investigation and any denials of applications for licensure. state confidentiality laws will still control the release and use of such information, but the database will be an invaluable tool to the party states in tracking and monitoring ongoing investigations and disciplinary action of nurses.
    the compact privileges and requirements only affect those states who have implemented the compact through the legislative process. if a nurse currently hold a license in a non-party state, that license will not be affected. therefore, if a nurse desires to practice in that non-party state, they will need to continue to renew their license there until such time as the state enters into the compact through legislative action.
    if you currently live in a non-party state but have a texas license, the texas license will not be considered a home license which grants a multistate licensing privilege. a non-resident texas license is still required in order for a non-resident nurse to practice nursing in texas. as new states enter into the compact, a nurse holding a resident license in that state will be eligible for a multistate privilege. if you live in texas after this date your license will be a home state license, granting the multistate privilege in all party states. at this time, there is no plan by the board to increase licensure fees.
    as other states join the compact, the texas board of nurse examiners will keep you fully informed so that you will have sufficient and timely information to inform you of the implications of multistate licensure.
    if you have any questions regarding the compact or its impact on your license, please refer to the board's website. general questions about the compact language or the concept of mutual recognition of licensure can be obtained from the national council of state boards of nursing website at www.ncsbn.org.
    Katmandu likes this.
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    I have been a RN for about 6 months now. From Texas. I've never really paid attention to compact licensing before. But lately I've been thinking about moving to New York so I can move in together with my wife-to-be. I was gonna ask what I should do to be able to practice there. I saw in NCSBN website that NY is not part of the compact states. Does that mean that I have to take their boards to be able to practice? Forgive me if this seems to be a dumb question. Somebody enlighten me please. Thanks!
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    Quote from mackoi03
    I have been a RN for about 6 months now. From Texas. I've never really paid attention to compact licensing before. But lately I've been thinking about moving to New York so I can move in together with my wife-to-be. I was gonna ask what I should do to be able to practice there. I saw in NCSBN website that NY is not part of the compact states. Does that mean that I have to take their boards to be able to practice? Forgive me if this seems to be a dumb question. Somebody enlighten me please. Thanks!
    Once you've passed NCLEX, you never have to take it again.

    If you wish to move to New York, you will simply need to pay the fees and undergo the necessary background checks to endorse your license into that state.
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    Quote from TheCommuter
    Once you've passed NCLEX, you never have to take it again.

    If you wish to move to New York, you will simply need to pay the fees and undergo the necessary background checks to endorse your license into that state.
    Nice!! Thanks for that info! I really apprec8 ur input. Another question though... If I do that, do I have to surrender my Texas license or can I keep it so that if I want to move back here to Texas, I can practice?
    tettehnurse likes this.


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