Wwould like information please on LNC

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    I live in IL, near Chicago, and I am already burned out from mistreatement from management and lousy working conditions. When I mean lousy, I mean one thermometer for the entire ED, improperly working cardiac monitors, or not supplies at all. Then, during an "HR interview to see what my plans were after I get my adopted daughters from Poland" my manager mentioned in front of the HR director that I "rolled my eyes" when asked to do some menial task and that I took 45 minutes to see a patient. So of course when I presented my side of the story, it was "you need to be more of a team player" BS. If were a nursing offense there'd be no nurses working. I mean, is this really relevant? As for the 45 minutes to see a patient, the Charge Nurse failed to leave out that I was with an unstable patient at the moment when he told me "take the patient in 1. She's 101 years old w/constipation". So, I'm up to my eyeballs in being disgusted with nursing, even after such a short amount of time.

    I have always wanted to go to law school and get some formal training in law, and this seems like a good compromise.

    I'm ADN prepared and two years out of school, and already I am sick of bedside nursing. Not the patients, just the bs from the managers and the lies they will spout to get you on board, then treat you like furniture. But I digress.

    Any real world experience out there would be most appreciated, and any recommendations for schools (especially in the Chicago area) would be great. I'm not looking to make a ton of money; I plan to work part-time so I can raise my newly adopted daughters (Yeah! 14 months old and just devils; we adopted from Poland). I'd like to take a decent job where I can use my head and not just follow orders from MD's as I feel I have been in the year I've been in the ED. (I have similar rants on this on other threads).

    I have requested information from the Northwestern Business College (no idea if they are connected with Northwestern University) but the cost is pretty pricey -- almost 9K for one year of study. Your input is appreciated.

    My goal would be to work part time for a law firm or have a fairly steady consultant business going. Any thought?

    Thanks and Merry Christmas. We go back to Warsaw to get our girls Christmas night!
    Last edit by Stitchie on Dec 23, '04
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    Quote from Stitchie
    I live in IL, near Chicago, and I am already burned out from mistreatement from management and lousy working conditions. When I mean lousy, I mean one thermometer for the entire ED, improperly working cardiac monitors, or not supplies at all. Then, during an "HR interview to see what my plans were after I get my adopted daughters from Poland" my manager mentioned in front of the HR director that I "rolled my eyes" when asked to do some menial task and that I took 45 minutes to see a patient. So of course when I presented my side of the story, it was "you need to be more of a team player" BS. If were a nursing offense there'd be no nurses working. I mean, is this really relevant? As for the 45 minutes to see a patient, the Charge Nurse failed to leave out that I was with an unstable patient at the moment when he told me "take the patient in 1. She's 101 years old w/constipation". So, I'm up to my eyeballs in being disgusted with nursing, even after such a short amount of time.

    I have always wanted to go to law school and get some formal training in law, and this seems like a good compromise.

    I'm ADN prepared and two years out of school, and already I am sick of bedside nursing. Not the patients, just the bs from the managers and the lies they will spout to get you on board, then treat you like furniture. But I digress.

    Any real world experience out there would be most appreciated, and any recommendations for schools (especially in the Chicago area) would be great. I'm not looking to make a ton of money; I plan to work part-time so I can raise my newly adopted daughters (Yeah! 14 months old and just devils; we adopted from Poland). I'd like to take a decent job where I can use my head and not just follow orders from MD's as I feel I have been in the year I've been in the ED. (I have similar rants on this on other threads).

    I have requested information from the Northwestern Business College (no idea if they are connected with Northwestern University) but the cost is pretty pricey -- almost 9K for one year of study. Your input is appreciated.

    My goal would be to work part time for a law firm or have a fairly steady consultant business going. Any thought?

    Thanks and Merry Christmas. We go back to Warsaw to get our girls Christmas night!
    Here are my thoughts:
    I have been doing independent legal consulting for about fifteen years. The lawyers who hire me (plaintiff's) want my 25 years of experience at the bedside. (I translate the chart, speak to the nursing standards of care in place at the time of the injury, read between the lines of the chart, give my opinion on merit, educate the lawyer on the anatomy and physiology, disease process, applicable research, etc on the issues. I also help find expert witnesses.) My credibility is directly derived from my experience. When I lived in Chicago, I charged $185/hr for these services. Other LNC's I have met have greater than 10 years bedside experience in their specialty, and many are like me with greater than 20 years experience.

    This much experience is not necessary to do the work (Vickie Milazzo had about two years in critical care when she set out), but it will make you competitive.

    Next: You need to work at a new place. There is a nursing shortage and if the hospital and/or its management treats you badly, move on. You will probably get a sign on bonus at the new place!

    You may contact me privately to discuss this further <redbait@earthlink.net>


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