Regarding the Future of Legal Nursing as viewed in Spokane, Washington - page 2

Legal Nurses be forewarned- here in Spokane (not the highest paid region of the country), an temp agency called "Provisional Staffing", just had an ad in Sunday's paper for a law firm, who was... Read More

  1. by   TrudyRN
    [quote=Agnus;2061643]gemini81sg, heck I was not talking about being afraid to call at 3 a.m. I work day shift. It is more like 3 in the afternoon! THAT is how bad this is. Just yesterday I heard a physician say, "the next 4 times you think about calling me, don't." This was not because the called him.

    And I would have said, "Well, I must call when I must call, Doctor. You know that. You wouldn't want to lose a patient or wind up in court because you told me not to call you, would you?" He'd have been totally speechless, I guarantee.
  2. by   RN1989
    I realize that this posting is old, but I think that the original posting issue was forgotten. I don't believe that the job that the original poster was unable to apply for was taken by an RN. The post was for an RN/LPN. Think about it - how many RNs would quit their hospital job to work for $14/hr? Anytime that I have looked into a job that was looking for EITHER an RN/LPN, RN/LPN/MA or some combo of variously licensed or certificate people - they ALWAYS are going to offer low pay. Yes, they would like an RN if they can get one for half salary but they are willing to take a medical assistant if that is the only person willing to work for such a low salary.
  3. by   DeepRN
    Good point.
  4. by   suanna
    I wonder what the job entailed. Was the nurse supposed to use professional judgement to evaluate the patients care according to "standard of practice" eather for or against malpractice or was it purely a clerical position of cross checking ordered tests/treatments/meds. to the billed services. The later I would be willing to do for $15./hr; the former I would want professional wages. Could there have been a per chart/ per case compensation in addition to the hourly wage? I can't imaginge even a legal nurse "wanabe" accepting such poor wages if the job required professional judgement.
  5. by   ebear
    Quote from hollyvk
    Hello all,

    I am an RN, I am a lawyer. I've worked for healthcare facilities, I've worked for attorneys. And here is what I know to be true.

    1. People providing eduction (nursing schools, law schools, legal nurse consultant trainers) are in the BUSINESS of promoting their educational enterprises. How you pay for it is your problem and none of them guarantees that with the training/education you've paid them for that you will find employment at an enhanced/elevated wage.

    2. Attorneys are probably even more cost-conscious than healthcare facilities when employing contract employees (that would be you, contracting as a nursing consultant, to review medical records, provide advice concerning the case, and perhaps testifying as an expert witness). (Healthcare facilities pay a pretty penny for contract employees, aka "traveling nurses").

    3. Most attorneys (and certainly litigation attorneys) are VERY SKILLED negotiators. If you think you can squeeze extra $ out of them without having some unique skill, you're kidding yourself.

    4. Yes, physicians who are experts on litigation cases get paid quite well. And that's because you cannot put on a case without one, and because physicians make a lot more $ than RNs working in healthcare. I hear new radiologists fresh out of training are getting a starting salary of around $250K/yr.

    5. Is it fair that this position was filled by a "wannabe" willing to work for less than RN healthcare wages? Well, not if you're envisioning yourself making lots of $ with your newly-paid for legal nurse consultant training, but since I don't foresee that designation having much of an impact on the American Trial Attorneys' membership, you should evaluate what effect "market forces" will have on your new "specialty."

    The only RNs I know making decent $ doing legal work are the nurse attorneys or nurse paralegals who can stand to work with/for attorneys. And there few of those jobs available compared to the number of RN jobs. Again--market forces.

    So before you shell out good $ for ANY training or education program, due diligence calls for thoroughly investing the realistic employment opportunities to be had with such training. And if you ONLY consider what the program's personnel are telling you, you do not have an accurate assessment.

    HollyVK, RN, BSN, JD
    (who has had to sue attorneys she's done work for in order to get paid--another problem you generally don't have with healthcare providers)
    hollyvk thank you for the reality check! I'm just starting out as a certified LNC and needed the helpful hints!
  6. by   a21chdchic
    9-8-2007
    The truth of the matter is this - Nurses do not band together and support each other. If we ALL stood together, UNITED, the conditions in which we work would change. Instead, most nurses so afraid for their jobs to stand up for what we deserve. Ladies and gentlemen - WE are the backbone of healthcare and are treated like grunts by those in charge. There is no respect given to us as individuals or as professionals. When will we ALL wake up and realize our worth? If you know your worth, you will collect on it - one way or another and that is why LNC's will succeed, and in the degree in which we choose.

    a21chdchic
  7. by   lindarn
    Quote from suanna
    I wonder what the job entailed. Was the nurse supposed to use professional judgement to evaluate the patients care according to "standard of practice" eather for or against malpractice or was it purely a clerical position of cross checking ordered tests/treatments/meds. to the billed services. The later I would be willing to do for $15./hr; the former I would want professional wages. Could there have been a per chart/ per case compensation in addition to the hourly wage? I can't imaginge even a legal nurse "wanabe" accepting such poor wages if the job required professional judgement.
    You can't imagine it, because you never worked in Spokane, Washington. There are three schools of nursing here, and nurses are treated as such. I just applied for a job with the Health Department, and was offered $18.00 and hour. HS dropout wages are the norm here.

    Lindarn, RN, BSN, CCRN
    Spokane, Washington
    Last edit by lindarn on Sep 10, '07 : Reason: spelling
  8. by   msparadigm
    I am new to this site and finding some of these messages very entertaining. I dont know what type of nursing these Nurses that you refer to as typical co-dependents are practicing, but they need to get with the times. I have worked in very busy ER'S for >10 yrs and most of the nurses that I have worked with are at the very least assertive. IF they dont start out that way, they end up that way. We are considered a very integral part of the team in the ER setting, oftentimes knowing farmore than the new residents that are giving the orders. We dont get up for doctors to sit, moreso we tell them to get out of our chair!! We function with much autonomy and are respected by even the seasoned ER attendings. If you dont respect yourself and your own knowledge, how can you expect those around you to respect you? If in an emergency situation, there are drs yelling out multiple orders, it doesnt mean alot unless there are teamplaying nurses around them that are prepared to deliver the orders quickly and make them look good.If you dont function in a setting where you feel that you are respected for your profession, it is never too late to change it.
  9. by   a21chdchic
    One point on convincing an attorney why you're worth what you're asking him/her to pay for-----you have to believe yourself that your are worth it, and be confident in that belief.
    Basically, it is like any other thing that you are money or to be paid for.
    I am not experienced in LNC, I am not yet certified. But I am very much confident in my abilities as both an individual, and as a professional nurse. I think if you are both and have good communication skills, you can do anything you set your mind to doing----both as an individual and as a professional.:smiley_abSo, You Go, Girl!!!
  10. by   RN Power Ohio
    I believe that many attorneys do not appreciate what an experienced nurse brings to the table. I started out as an in house LNC for a very low wage to get my foot in the door. It was a learning experience for all involved.
    I was actually asked during my interview if I could "write a sentance". I am thankful I took the position. I believe the attorneys are too. We now work together on different terms. I am now an independent contractor and I am very pleased with the arrangement.
  11. by   lcc1080
    I have been offered a chance, by an agency, to work on MR review for a class action pharma suit (long term project). I have some lnc background, but wondering if this is a good way to get addtl training?

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