BSN to JD or LNC

  1. 1
    Hello,

    I have been a nurse for 12 years and have noticed that LNCs can charge a lot of money for their hours worked but it seems that pioneers of the LNC profession all went on to law school after their BSN or MSN programs. I would think that having a law degree would put you at an advantage of sitting at the same level of attorneys but with the added benefit of having nursing knowledge and experience.

    I looked at Vicki's profile as well as the the founder of Jurex LNC programs and both are nurses with their MSN and JD degree. I know law school is very expensive and time consuming (3 years) but it is a very good investment in the long-run.

    I looked at how Vicki's program was masterfully marketed and put together. She has positioned herself to be well paid now and in the future. Not only is she making money by the amount she charges for the 3 tiers of classes she offers, but she also makes money off of the certification exam that nurses must pay for in order to get the CLNC credential. This certification is valid for 5 years just like other certifications from various nursing accrediting bodies. With her certification, you must pay her in order to keep your CLNC title. If you decide to credential with another program, you lose the CLNC title, which carries a lot of weight I assume. I think this was a great marketing tool she has setup. Even if she decides to stop holding seminars herself and decides to retire, she could delegate the operations of her business to someone else, and relax knowing that every 5 years, nurses will be paying her for that CLNC title. This equates to constant revenue.

    I would recommend going the law school route. Get the most bang for you buck. If you cut out the middle man, you can go straight to the pot. I tell my friends that do agency work...if they are paying you $55/hr, how much more are the agencies making? If you by-pass the agency and get yourself Incorporated and hire an accountant, you can go straight to the hospital and contract your services out and charge them $100/hr, especially if you have various specialtly experience.

    My collegue has experience in OR, ICU, ER, and med-surg. I told him he is a great asset for any hospital because he can then work the area they have the greatest need and can make close to $100/hr. This is the same thing with the LNC. Yes, you can make money as an LNC but how much more can you make with a law degree?

    I think many nurses want the quick route/fix to success but as we know, when you invest the time and energy over the long-run, the other side is much nicer. I know many nurses have obstacles in their way, such as money and family responsibilities, but if you really want to get a bigger piece of the pie, then sometimes you have to make sacrifices.

    I am studying for the Law School Admissions Test (LSAT) as an option but my true love is nurse anesthesia. I have always wanted to obtain my JD degree to be educated in the law.

    Just wanted to add my 2 cents

    Antonio, RN, MSN, CNOR, CMSRN
    Last edit by SRNA4U on Jan 2, '10
    txspadequeenRN likes this.
  2. Get the Hottest Nursing Topics Straight to Your Inbox!

  3. 2 Comments so far...

  4. 6
    Quote from Air Force RN
    Hello,

    I have been a nurse for 12 years and have noticed that LNCs can charge a lot of money for their hours worked but it seems that pioneers of the LNC profession all went on to law school after their BSN or MSN programs. I would think that having a law degree would put you at an advantage of sitting at the same level of attorneys but with the added benefit of having nursing knowledge and experience.

    I looked at Vicki's profile as well as the the founder of Jurex LNC programs and both are nurses with their MSN and JD degree. I know law school is very expensive and time consuming (3 years) but it is a very good investment in the long-run.

    I looked at how Vicki's program was masterfully marketed and put together. She has positioned herself to be well paid now and in the future. Not only is she making money by the amount she charges for the 3 tiers of classes she offers, but she also makes money off of the certification exam that nurses must pay for in order to get the CLNC credential. This certification is valid for 5 years just like other certifications from various nursing accrediting bodies. With her certification, you must pay her in order to keep your CLNC title. If you decide to credential with another program, you lose the CLNC title, which carries a lot of weight I assume. I think this was a great marketing tool she has setup. Even if she decides to stop holding seminars herself and decides to retire, she could delegate the operations of her business to someone else, and relax knowing that every 5 years, nurses will be paying her for that CLNC title. This equates to constant revenue.

    I would recommend going the law school route. Get the most bang for you buck. If you cut out the middle man, you can go straight to the pot. I tell my friends that do agency work...if they are paying you $55/hr, how much more are the agencies making? If you by-pass the agency and get yourself Incorporated and hire an accountant, you can go straight to the hospital and contract your services out and charge them $100/hr, especially if you have various specialtly experience.

    My collegue has experience in OR, ICU, ER, and med-surg. I told him he is a great asset for any hospital because he can then work the area they have the greatest need and can make close to $100/hr. This is the same thing with the LNC. Yes, you can make money as an LNC but how much more can you make with a law degree?

    I think many nurses want the quick route/fix to success but as we know, when you invest the time and energy over the long-run, the other side is much nicer. I know many nurses have obstacles in their way, such as money and family responsibilities, but if you really want to get a bigger piece of the pie, then sometimes you have to make sacrifices.

    I am studying for the Law School Admissions Test (LSAT) as an option but my true love is nurse anesthesia. I have always wanted to obtain my JD degree to be educated in the law.

    Just wanted to add my 2 cents

    Antonio, RN, MSN, CNOR, CMSRN
    I would like to correct a fallacy about "LNC Certifications". One does not need any form of certification to work as a Legal Nurse Consultant. That is perpetuated by the individuals who stand to make the money from these certifications.

    One needs ecucation and experience in the practice of nursing. I work for a female attorney who went to law school after working as an RN for several years. I told her about the "CLNC" Certificate, the cost of obtaining it, and maintaining it at considerable cost.

    She laughed her head off when I described the slick marketing campaign, the cost of the program, and the assertion that VM was the. "pioneer of legal nursing". My boss was working for attorneys before she went to law school, which predated the developement of the CLNC program by VM. She was just voted in the top ten attorneys in Eastern Washington (9.5).

    She was interested as to how this "certification" came about. I went on line and showed her the web site. She just shook her head in amazement that anyone would spend that kind of money "learn how to read medical records", for attorneys. Didn't you learn that in Nursing schoool? Don't you read medical records at work? Can't you figure out how to do medical research? Didn't you do that in nursing schoool?

    Want to learn markeing principles? Take an inexpensive course at your local community college. Put the rest of the money you would have spent for the CLNC certrification towards business cards, letterhead stationary, etc. and put the rest of the money in the back.

    Send out marketing letters to attorneys, exhibit at CLE functions, and make your self know to the attorneys in town.

    Invest in the AALNC's "Principles and Practice", the BIBLE of LNC, and check out the marketing and business materials they have on their website. They also have and online LNC curse. They are ALL well worth the money, and far less expensive than materials purchased from the, "Amway of LNC Courses". To quote a line from and old McDOnalds commercial, "you get change back from your dollar".

    I would like to add, that LNC is becoming quite flooded with nurses looking for another avenue to use their education and expertise to get out of the bedside nursing rat race. I have been told my more than one attorney that, "Legal Nurses are a dime a dozen". And they are right. Look at any ads in nursing magazines, and there is the ad, " Become an LNC. Earn $150 and hour and kiss those 12 hour shifts goodbye". Very tempting in todays "anti nurses" climate in the hospital.

    Anyway, you willl get alot more bang for your buck with the materials from the AALNC. And not have to sell your first born child to accomplish becoming and LNC. LOL. JMHO and my NY $0.02.

    Lindarn, RN, BSN, CCRN
    Spokane, Washington
    Last edit by lindarn on Jan 2, '10
    Purple_Scrubs, Zookeeper3, vanlo001, and 3 others like this.
  5. 1
    I totally agree with everything you just mentioned. You just gave me a different perspective I didn't think about. Great posting.

    Antonio
    lindarn likes this.


Top