Is this really a med error? - page 2

by gemini14 2,659 Views | 13 Comments

Hi! I work at at Methadone Center. Mon 6AM the 2 RNs (myself included) attempted multiple times to open our safe and retrieve the necessary medication to begin our daily doing of outpatient clients (they call them clients... Read More


  1. 0
    Quote from nursel56
    I found a couple of references that state this is a med error, specifically "error of omission" which is described as a patient/client not receiving a scheduled dose of medication before the next dose is due.
    An error of omission implies that nursing forgot to administer the med, which is not the case here, and I still think that reporting this as a med error is putting blame on the nurses for a situation beyond their control. More appropriately reported as an incident, I feel. Not a med error.
  2. 0
    Quote from SaoirseRN
    An error of omission implies that nursing forgot to administer the med, which is not the case here, and I still think that reporting this as a med error is putting blame on the nurses for a situation beyond their control. More appropriately reported as an incident, I feel. Not a med error.
    The original purpose and what I was taught is that the error reporting isn't meant to assign blame even if you interpreted the error as being caused by the nurse forgetting as opposed to an unavailable med due to something outside of the nurse's control. The reports are supposed to be used to analyze data and identify system failures. It wasn't supposed to be punitive, because that would discourage people from making reports and providing the input needed to reduce error rates.

    It seems that more and more they are seen as a punitive action, even managers use them in that way, unfortunately. Anyway, that wasn't my opinion, but that of a few references I found that came from credible sources.
  3. 0
    Thanks everyone. Came down to signing the Med Report or looking for new job....so we signed....(wimps). Was very illuminating how the DON's attitude was regarding at fault...then threatened to report each of us to the Ky Board of Nursing...as since they were not received in 24hrs, we have made an illegal act according to the "Nursing Process". Love my job....LOL!
  4. 1
    Quote from nursel56

    The original purpose and what I was taught is that the error reporting isn't meant to assign blame even if you interpreted the error as being caused by the nurse forgetting as opposed to an unavailable med due to something outside of the nurse's control. The reports are supposed to be used to analyze data and identify system failures. It wasn't supposed to be punitive, because that would discourage people from making reports and providing the input needed to reduce error rates.

    It seems that more and more they are seen as a punitive action, even managers use them in that way, unfortunately. Anyway, that wasn't my opinion, but that of a few references I found that came from credible sources.
    This.

    Also, I was once told by a dr/former medical director that JC looks hard at facilities that report very few med errors because they know mistakes are being made and assume they aren't being caught or reported when there are too few.

    The hospitals I work at seem to take this as intended and I only know of one nurse being called to the carpet for her errors (which were numerous).
    nursel56 likes this.


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