Any LPN's in KY? I have a question...

  1. 0
    I typed out a whole long post and is disappeared

    Anyway, I asked this on the LPN board and was directed here since I might get more responses. I want to know if anyone has information on what an LPN can and can't do in KY. I am starting my LPN program this month and realized after my mom asked me that I don't really know the answer to that question. I have read the BON website for KY, and it is very vague, and that tree they use to determine who does what tasks makes it even more fuzzy to me.

    So, if anyone can give me some answers, or even direct me to a site that has a better explanation, I would greatly appreciate it.

    Thanks!
    KentuckyLady

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  2. 5 Comments...

  3. 0
    Hello, I am a RN student, not an LPN, but I believe I can help you out somewhat anyway. I work at the VAMC in Lexington, where we employ several LPN's on my floor. The way I understand it, at least in our facility, is that the LPN's can administer meds, injections, take glucose readings, insert feeding tubes and NG's, install IV's, and give IV pushes. LPN's (at our facility) cannot administer medications through a central line (different from a PICC), cannot reset the medication in a PCA, and do not do assessments. I could be seriously mistaken on some of this, but this is what I have observed so far. Hope it helps.
  4. 0
    Quote from oddone
    Hello, I am a RN student, not an LPN, but I believe I can help you out somewhat anyway. I work at the VAMC in Lexington, where we employ several LPN's on my floor. The way I understand it, at least in our facility, is that the LPN's can administer meds, injections, take glucose readings, insert feeding tubes and NG's, install IV's, and give IV pushes. LPN's (at our facility) cannot administer medications through a central line (different from a PICC), cannot reset the medication in a PCA, and do not do assessments. I could be seriously mistaken on some of this, but this is what I have observed so far. Hope it helps.
    Thank you very, very much.

    I am actually contemplating trying to switch into the RN program. Are you at Bluegrass? I know the programs are really competitive, so I am trying to take all my prereq's this semester and apply for the RN and CROSS MY FINGERS! I will be attending one of the KCTCS schools. Any helpful tips on getting accepted?

    KentuckyLady
  5. 0
    That's outstanding. By all means, I highly encourage you to apply. Yes, our program is very competitive. Be sure that you have taken all the prerequisites within the last 7? years. (I think it's 7.) Also, they look very highly at ACT/NLN scores. There is a book out about Test Success for Nursing Students that is one of the NSG 115 books available in the bookstore, which I would highly recommend if you are weak at all in testing, as everything in nursing (besides clinicals obviously) is multiple choice. I would also recommend applying to EKU's program as well just to cover your bases. They have a really good program, and a lot of people don't realize that they have an ADN. Hope all is well with you.

    Aaron
  6. 0
    Quote from oddone
    Hello, I am a RN student, not an LPN, but I believe I can help you out somewhat anyway. I work at the VAMC in Lexington, where we employ several LPN's on my floor. The way I understand it, at least in our facility, is that the LPN's can administer meds, injections, take glucose readings, insert feeding tubes and NG's, install IV's, and give IV pushes. LPN's (at our facility) cannot administer medications through a central line (different from a PICC), cannot reset the medication in a PCA, and do not do assessments. I could be seriously mistaken on some of this, but this is what I have observed so far. Hope it helps.
    I work in a LTC facility that is sending the LPN's through a class so that we can do IV pushes. Also we are not able to spike blood but will be able to monitor and discontinue blood. LPN's are not allowed to do the initial assessment of a patient (a new admit) but can do those thereafter. The KBN website addresses alot of these topics but they are kind of confusing. I also think it depends on whether your facility adopts the policy.
  7. 0
    Quote from wt2001
    I work in a LTC facility that is sending the LPN's through a class so that we can do IV pushes.
    Our LPN's can do that too...makes life a whole lot easier. It's not exactly rocket science, unless you're like the unfortunate RN at Saint Joseph all those years ago that pushed Potassium instead of saline. Gotta double check those labels!


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