Starting the LPN program in Aug any tips on succeeding???

  1. Hi, Im exicted about NURSING Im a 28 yr old who will not give up on her dreams!!! I did the kids before getting a :angryfireeducation and now that they are older I can finally focus on getting a education. I've finished all pre req classes towards the RN program but the list is so long I have to go into the LPN program I would like to hear from anyone who has made the transition LPN/RN bridge. Also anyone who has already went through either program. I'd like to hear all the GORRY DETAILS...........







    Thanks the HEART of a
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  2. 12 Comments

  3. by   Blackcat99
    :chuckle LPN school-The way to survive is to study all the time and don't do anything else. I also found that it was best to not answer my phone either. That's what helped me. Best of luck to you.
  4. by   luckyladyore
    Quote from Blackcat99
    :chuckle LPN school-The way to survive is to study all the time and don't do anything else. I also found that it was best to not answer my phone either. That's what helped me. Best of luck to you.
    Thanks for the reply I will keep the phone off!!! Is it true that you may have 2 tst a day?
  5. by   howie122832
    I did it exactly the same way! I went to LPN school at the age of 34.after having my kids first! I chose LPN for exactly the same reason.. long waiting list for RN school. LPN was not at all like I expected. I 've never had to really study, but for LPN I did. I spent many hours writing care plans while my family was snuggled in their beds, only to get up at 5am to go to clinicals.... I was fortunate that I didn't have to work while going to school. I graduated on Nov 26, 2002. I took FLorida state boards the next March, and now I work as a LPN ...getting ready to start a new job next week.... I think the way to do it is,,, BALANCE! You have to balance your time. Decide how much time you need to study and stick to it! Don't forget family time, make time to go out, go to the movies etc.... Balance the two equally! Rely on your support system. I have a great support system.. MY husband was extremely supportive as were my kids!
    Good LUck to you! Let me know if you ever need to talk!
  6. by   luckyladyore
    Quote from howie122832
    I did it exactly the same way! I went to LPN school at the age of 34.after having my kids first! I chose LPN for exactly the same reason.. long waiting list for RN school. LPN was not at all like I expected. I 've never had to really study, but for LPN I did. I spent many hours writing care plans while my family was snuggled in their beds, only to get up at 5am to go to clinicals.... I was fortunate that I didn't have to work while going to school. I graduated on Nov 26, 2002. I took FLorida state boards the next March, and now I work as a LPN ...getting ready to start a new job next week.... I think the way to do it is,,, BALANCE! You have to balance your time. Decide how much time you need to study and stick to it! Don't forget family time, make time to go out, go to the movies etc.... Balance the two equally! Rely on your support system. I have a great support system.. MY husband was extremely supportive as were my kids!
    Good LUck to you! Let me know if you ever need to talk!
    Thanks I need all the advice I m taking it all in like a sponge. I will put you on my buddy list
  7. by   nurseunderwater
    I was the "Queen of the Flashcards" , tried like h*ll not to miss a class and took the most anal retentive notes you ever saw. I learned so much through really actively listening. I think these 2 things helped me most when it came time for clinicals and boards.

    Also, don't be afraid to dive in during your clinical experience and during the before "real life" scenarios in the lab.....You'll do great! It just takes some overies, or the other ones depending a students gender
  8. by   nurseholly421
    [QUOTE=luckyladyore@yahoo]Hi, Im exicted about NURSING Im a 28 yr old who will not give up on her dreams!!! I did the kids before getting a :angryfireeducation and now that they are older I can finally focus on getting a education. I've finished all pre req classes towards the RN program but the list is so long I have to go into the LPN program I would like to hear from anyone who has made the transition LPN/RN bridge. Also anyone who has already went through either program. I'd like to hear all the GORRY DETAILS...........


    HELLO . I say good luck to u and right on for pursueing ur dreams!!!!!!!!! I have to say that going to nursing school most times was pure hell but if I had to redo it I would.It was the best experience of my life!!I learned sooo much and the things i got to see were sooo interesting (plus my salary doubled he he). The actual school work was the hell part of it but once u get past that and get to the clinical its great thats when u really know whether or not this is right field for u. I got to see many things like i helped deliver a baby(yuckkkkkk i was unfortunate enough to get her fluid all over me when she sprayed when the baby came out):imbar i got to see a woman cut open to remove part of her colon to remove cancer only to find out she was full of it (so now i know what cancer looks like on the inside)(the smell of burning flesh when they were opening her up was .........putrid!!!) got to see what the inside of intestines look like when they did a colonoscopy(the thing I found interesting on most that I watched was that u saw alot of undissoved pills still in the intestines) i got to watch a below the knee amputation. that was just a few of the things i saw in clinical. my best advise to u is to remember the main ideas of the the chapters and ignore the rest.participate in class as much as u can the more u do the more the teachers like u and are opt to give u the most opportunities in clinical. volunteer for everything in clinical even if it sounds gross as they are more likely to let u see and do the cool stuff then.You don't necessarily have to be the smartest u just have to show great interest and desire.But the best advise I can give you is that of course remember what u learned in school but when u get in the real world remember that most of the time what they taught u in school(the right way to do things)isnt always what happens.Just remember that the most important thing is that u have done all u can for the patient to the best of ur ability with compassion. If u show compassion and do whatever it takes to make patients happy u have a hell of alot of less problems even if it takes an extra few minutes u dont have. Once again i say good luck and if u ever wanna email me nurseholly421@yahoo.com or im me on yahoo messenger with nurseholly421(i rarely check email get a quicker response from me with messenger) hopefully talk at ya later bye




    Thanks the HEART of a
  9. by   Vicki1965
    I did the same as you. Kids first and then finally at 28 I was accepted into an LVN program. I agree with nurseholly421. Get in there and don't be afraid to get your hands dirty, learn as much as you can in clinicals it helps you to make some since out of the theory. But that really won't make complete since until you have worked for a while, but don't let that deter you. One day when you are taking care of a patient you will say to yourself "Okay, now I understand the theory behind...." and you will fill in the blank.
    And yes you may have 2 tests or more in a day. But don't stress about them. I found that buying the study guides that most texts have were a BIG help. In my program a lot of the questions came from the study guides. Also if you are having difficulty in a subject, most schools have tutors available that are free of charge to you, you can check that out at the student services center at the school you will be attending.
    Another important thing to remember is that even though you will be studying what seems like all of the time, you have to take some time out for your family. I am fortunate in that my husband has always been very supportive of my wanting to pursue my dreams. But I always remember that I have to take at least one day a month where I don't study (at least during the day)and just spend time with my husband and kids.
    I have now been an LVN for almost 9 years and in June I will be graduating from an ADN program and it has all been worth the effort and struggles. And all of the rewards are worth it. I have laughed , cried , and prayed:angel2: with many patients in my short career, I have always loved my career choice and look forward to more responsibility in caring for my patients and providing the best care I can to each and every one of them.
    One more tidbit of advice, laugh alot, it helps to have a good sense of humor in the nursing field.
    GOOD LUCK TO YOU, A FUTURE NURSE.


    Quote from luckyladyore@yahoo
    Hi, Im exicted about NURSING Im a 28 yr old who will not give up on her dreams!!! I did the kids before getting a :angryfireeducation and now that they are older I can finally focus on getting a education. I've finished all pre req classes towards the RN program but the list is so long I have to go into the LPN program I would like to hear from anyone who has made the transition LPN/RN bridge. Also anyone who has already went through either program. I'd like to hear all the GORRY DETAILS...........







    Thanks the HEART of a
  10. by   luckyladyore
    Quote from Vicki1965
    I did the same as you. Kids first and then finally at 28 I was accepted into an LVN program. I agree with nurseholly421. Get in there and don't be afraid to get your hands dirty, learn as much as you can in clinicals it helps you to make some since out of the theory. But that really won't make complete since until you have worked for a while, but don't let that deter you. One day when you are taking care of a patient you will say to yourself "Okay, now I understand the theory behind...." and you will fill in the blank.
    And yes you may have 2 tests or more in a day. But don't stress about them. I found that buying the study guides that most texts have were a BIG help. In my program a lot of the questions came from the study guides. Also if you are having difficulty in a subject, most schools have tutors available that are free of charge to you, you can check that out at the student services center at the school you will be attending.
    Another important thing to remember is that even though you will be studying what seems like all of the time, you have to take some time out for your family. I am fortunate in that my husband has always been very supportive of my wanting to pursue my dreams. But I always remember that I have to take at least one day a month where I don't study (at least during the day)and just spend time with my husband and kids.
    I have now been an LVN for almost 9 years and in June I will be graduating from an ADN program and it has all been worth the effort and struggles. And all of the rewards are worth it. I have laughed , cried , and prayed:angel2: with many patients in my short career, I have always loved my career choice and look forward to more responsibility in caring for my patients and providing the best care I can to each and every one of them.
    One more tidbit of advice, laugh alot, it helps to have a good sense of humor in the nursing field.
    GOOD LUCK TO YOU, A FUTURE NURSE.
    Thank you for all the wonderful advice. Congradulations on your accomplishments that great . I plan to bridge over also your word are graceful and a light unto my path
  11. by   Nur_1996
    I totally agree with the other members advise. I was 32 when I went though my LPN program, I have been a nurse now for 8 years. I have several credits toward my RN, but had to put that on hold for some health reasons. I had 4 children ages 2, 5, 11, 14 when I went through my LPN program, my husband and I were on different shifts. I worked nights as a secretary in a ER he worked retail, all different shifts. My older kids helped with the younger ones, and I guess everything worked out OK. I'm sitting here writing this 8 years later. I was tired a lot, up 24 hours plus a lot, I spent many nights and days studying and studying! I totally agree with if there is something that comes up in clinicals, raise your hard high! And give it a try, even to this day I never stop learning. The fact that I was a dental assistant for years before my secretarty days in the ER helped too. I learned so much about patient care, and the experiences in the ER were great. Their will be days that you may question is it really worth it, for me it was. I love nursing, and the many oppertunties it gives me each day. Good Luck, Marie
  12. by   manna
    Welcome, and good luck!

    I'm another kids first-education later gal. If only I knew then what I know now...
  13. by   luckyladyore
    Quote from Nur_1996
    I totally agree with the other members advise. I was 32 when I went though my LPN program, I have been a nurse now for 8 years. I have several credits toward my RN, but had to put that on hold for some health reasons. I had 4 children ages 2, 5, 11, 14 when I went through my LPN program, my husband and I were on different shifts. I worked nights as a secretary in a ER he worked retail, all different shifts. My older kids helped with the younger ones, and I guess everything worked out OK. I'm sitting here writing this 8 years later. I was tired a lot, up 24 hours plus a lot, I spent many nights and days studying and studying! I totally agree with if there is something that comes up in clinicals, raise your hard high! And give it a try, even to this day I never stop learning. The fact that I was a dental assistant for years before my secretarty days in the ER helped too. I learned so much about patient care, and the experiences in the ER were great. Their will be days that you may question is it really worth it, for me it was. I love nursing, and the many oppertunties it gives me each day.


    Good Luck, Marie
    Thanks Ive heard some wonderful inspirations thank you ALL
  14. by   Jayonoway
    Good luck and go for it! I didn't attend LPN school until I was 37 and my husband deployed for overseas! My school was 12 mos long with the possibility of flunking out all the way to the last day! My best kept "secret" to my success would be that I got a fellow student to car pool with. We would quiz each other each morning and be there at the end of the day to vent and/or chat. We pushed each other, psyched each other up and supported one another. I have never regretted becoming a nurse, I love it. I have not yet found my niche, I have worked on a very busy ortho floor, and extended care floor and now working home health. I think I may continue on to become a paramedic! So...with those words of wisdom I'll end here! LOL!! :chuckle

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