Recently registered, Greetings!!!

  1. 4
    Hello! My name is Andy. I am a recently registered nurse, and I'm excited to begin my career.
    I'm a guy, and 'man' it's been easy. The amount of respect and encouragement I have received through my clinical rotations, patients, supervisors, clinical instructors, and teachers has been great. People treat you different, and offer their positive 2-cents about the need for more male nurses.

    This is day 1 for me on allnurses.com. I came here initially looking for traveling nurse information because of the positive hear-say. I have still yet to find this information, and further explore this website.

    To make this thread a little more interesting, I thought I'd share some mistakes that I made throughout my education.

    *I almost never studied*
    This was not said to gloat. This was a mistake. My nursing school was known to be particularly hard; However, I am a very conceptual learner and 90% of all my learning occurs in the classroom and sticks. This, coupled with excellent teachers, helped me avoid the books. This was a mistake because I could have learned so much more and been a better nurse had I put in more effort. I never came close to failing, but I never got A's
    *I didn't always count respirations*
    During my clinicals, I just looked at people and if they were breathing at a rate that seemed normal, I would make up how many respirations per minute I thought they were having. This was a HUGE mistake. I have peoples’ lives in my hands, and it’s not like I always had better things I could be doing in my clinical rotations than sitting with the patient for a minute and counting respirations. I feel the guilt now, and had an excellent preceptor who taught me how to take more pride in my self-image. This image I have of myself is ‘thorough’, so that is what I became.
    *I didn’t take documentation seriously*
    This isn’t a big one in student clinicals. However, in the real world, this can save lives, save careers, and save money for you and your patient.
    *I bad-mouthed one of my best professors*
    She was tough. She was unfair. She took NCLEX questions from books, and made her own questions to the same style of NCLEX questions. The questions she took from books made sense and I often missed the hard ones, but the ones she made up were FRUSTRATING. Added to this, she NEVER took questions off, gave points back, or anything. She said “if you chose another answer, you must provide me with 3 credible book sources and a written paper on why that answer is correct.” I did this once. I still didn’t get the point, because she said one of my sources spoke too subjectively about the subject. One question that she made up was
    “(blahblahblah)…. You observe another nurse give a patient crushed meds through an NG tube, then clamp it. What do you do?”
    A) Accurately Document
    B) (obviously wrong answer)
    C) (obviously wrong answer) or
    D) Report that these meds were incorrectly given to your nursing manager.
    I chose D, because the nurse did NOT flush the NG tube, which is incorrect med administration, according to the information given. Her answer was A. She then tried to defend her answer, stating that D “you would lose friends pretty quickly just telling your nurse manager everything!” and “you are reading too far into the question.” I obsess on things like this because I want to do things right...
    On to her positives: She was tough. She demanded critical thinking through her questions, and it was NEVER ‘choose the critical lab value’ or ‘apply oxygen’. All of this critical thinking truly did prepare me to NCLEX exam style questions, and I passed first try. I owe her a lot of my skills, knowledge base, and passion for knowing my stuff.
    *I didn’t work as a CNA*
    and I wish I would have. These people find jobs at their institutions FAST, have a ton of resources to talk to about stuff all day, and work with these patients while applying newly learned things in their head as they go. I really regret not working as a CNA first…
    *I quit my part-time job too early*
    Just before taking my exam, I quit my job. You keep hearing “there’s such high demand for nurses!” The idea of getting that much larger paycheck for very trained work clouded the idea of how long the hiring process truly takes. I have turned in SEVERAL applications, 1 week later have not received 1 phone call related to an interview. Keep your job people!!!


    If I could go back and change these things, I would. Perhaps someone new to this site will read this and learn from my mistakes. Wow this is quite the TL;DR…

    Look forward to the knowledge I can gain from this site, and other nurses!! I have the feeling I’ll be here a lot!
    Off to find the travel section…
    brian, Meriwhen, born2circulateRN, and 1 other like this.
  2. 2,569 Visits
    Find Similar Topics
  3. 10 Comments so far...

  4. 2
    Welcome to the site...as I wish you the best in all of your future endeavors...Aloha~
    pnut8377 and june42 like this.
  5. 1
    Thanks about the work as a CNA first advice. I am a PCT on a surgical telemetry unit and feel like I receive tons of info from both the nurses I assist and the patients I care fore. Great training for the future.
    pnut8377 likes this.
  6. 0
    Looking back briefly without dwelling seems like a good way to get lessons learned, without the baggage of beating your self up with it.

    In school I wish I had= taken more opportunities to perform procedures in my rotations. Instead of being a wall flower, I would have been able to practice skills I would need later.

    However, it is what it is, and here I am anyway. I love the title of new nurse as it provided me with cover for understanding and patience from my peers. The better nurse mentors were usually newer nurses, who get the struggle at the beginning, and though they are not the clinical experts 100%, they know the mental support and games that might come your way, which will help soothe and protect you during your whole career.
  7. 0
    Check out "On Assignment" for travel nursing. That is who I use.
    Last edit by tnbutterfly on Aug 19, '12
  8. 0
    Quote from UltraRN
    Hello! My name is Andy. I am a recently registered nurse, and I'm excited to begin my career.
    Hi Andy, great intro, glad to have you, and I bet you will have lots to offer AN!
  9. 0
    traveling assignments/recruiters want RN's with experience. You have to be ready to jump in with both feet and with very little orientation. Get at least 1-2 years of med/surg experience and then go forth
  10. 0
    If you decide to become a traveler I suggest that you work for at least a year in a telemetry unit,icu or er , traveing sounds exciting but your assignments will always be the toughest on the unit and IMHO you are setting yourself up for frustration and way too much stress for a new grad,cool your jets and learn your job first,in otherwords you must crawl before you walk and if you want to have a successful career you need to be mentored until you have any grasp of what your job and legal responsibilitis actually are,GOOD LUCK!!!!!
    Quote from UltraRN
    Hello! My name is Andy. I am a recently registered nurse, and I'm excited to begin my career.
    I'm a guy, and 'man' it's been easy. The amount of respect and encouragement I have received through my clinical rotations, patients, supervisors, clinical instructors, and teachers has been great. People treat you different, and offer their positive 2-cents about the need for more male nurses.

    This is day 1 for me on allnurses.com. I came here initially looking for traveling nurse information because of the positive hear-say. I have still yet to find this information, and further explore this website.

    To make this thread a little more interesting, I thought I'd share some mistakes that I made throughout my education.

    *I almost never studied*
    This was not said to gloat. This was a mistake. My nursing school was known to be particularly hard; However, I am a very conceptual learner and 90% of all my learning occurs in the classroom and sticks. This, coupled with excellent teachers, helped me avoid the books. This was a mistake because I could have learned so much more and been a better nurse had I put in more effort. I never came close to failing, but I never got A's
    *I didn't always count respirations*
    During my clinicals, I just looked at people and if they were breathing at a rate that seemed normal, I would make up how many respirations per minute I thought they were having. This was a HUGE mistake. I have peoples’ lives in my hands, and it’s not like I always had better things I could be doing in my clinical rotations than sitting with the patient for a minute and counting respirations. I feel the guilt now, and had an excellent preceptor who taught me how to take more pride in my self-image. This image I have of myself is ‘thorough’, so that is what I became.
    *I didn’t take documentation seriously*
    This isn’t a big one in student clinicals. However, in the real world, this can save lives, save careers, and save money for you and your patient.
    *I bad-mouthed one of my best professors*
    She was tough. She was unfair. She took NCLEX questions from books, and made her own questions to the same style of NCLEX questions. The questions she took from books made sense and I often missed the hard ones, but the ones she made up were FRUSTRATING. Added to this, she NEVER took questions off, gave points back, or anything. She said “if you chose another answer, you must provide me with 3 credible book sources and a written paper on why that answer is correct.” I did this once. I still didn’t get the point, because she said one of my sources spoke too subjectively about the subject. One question that she made up was
    “(blahblahblah)…. You observe another nurse give a patient crushed meds through an NG tube, then clamp it. What do you do?”
    A) Accurately Document
    B) (obviously wrong answer)
    C) (obviously wrong answer) or
    D) Report that these meds were incorrectly given to your nursing manager.
    I chose D, because the nurse did NOT flush the NG tube, which is incorrect med administration, according to the information given. Her answer was A. She then tried to defend her answer, stating that D “you would lose friends pretty quickly just telling your nurse manager everything!” and “you are reading too far into the question.” I obsess on things like this because I want to do things right...
    On to her positives: She was tough. She demanded critical thinking through her questions, and it was NEVER ‘choose the critical lab value’ or ‘apply oxygen’. All of this critical thinking truly did prepare me to NCLEX exam style questions, and I passed first try. I owe her a lot of my skills, knowledge base, and passion for knowing my stuff.
    *I didn’t work as a CNA*
    and I wish I would have. These people find jobs at their institutions FAST, have a ton of resources to talk to about stuff all day, and work with these patients while applying newly learned things in their head as they go. I really regret not working as a CNA first…
    *I quit my part-time job too early*
    Just before taking my exam, I quit my job. You keep hearing “there’s such high demand for nurses!” The idea of getting that much larger paycheck for very trained work clouded the idea of how long the hiring process truly takes. I have turned in SEVERAL applications, 1 week later have not received 1 phone call related to an interview. Keep your job people!!!


    If I could go back and change these things, I would. Perhaps someone new to this site will read this and learn from my mistakes. Wow this is quite the TL;DR…

    Look forward to the knowledge I can gain from this site, and other nurses!! I have the feeling I’ll be here a lot!
    Off to find the travel section…
  11. 0
    Welcome! I am new also to this site, Im also a new RN with one year experience on a cardiac telemetry floor, I recently got an ICU position at my local community hospital to gain more experience, however, I am really really itching to travel as well, I feel myself pulled to the West Coast.... I want two years in, but Im ready to leave soon .....Good luck to you!
  12. 0
    Thank you all for your warm welcome. I have been using this site a lot lately. It gets me involved with the politics of nursing; something that school can never teach you.

    -Andy, RN


Top