pre nursing classes

  1. Hi I'm new at this so please bare with me. I was wondering if anyone could answer this? I am almost done with all of my prerequisites for nursing school, except for micro. I have attempted micro 2 times. I dropped once and recieved a W. And I am thinking about dropping again. The problem is that most of these micro teachers are so bad at teaching and if you have a full-time job, it is almost impossible to keep up. I always get the worst teachers. So my question is, should I drop again, i am not doing so well in the class, and I am afraid if I drop nursing schools will look at how many W's I have. Or should I stick with it and try for a C. But is a C good enough?
    If anyone could offer some advice that would be great.
    Thanks
    halfmoon:imbar
    •  
  2. 9 Comments

  3. by   truern
    Halfmoon, I'm taking micro now so I understand what you're going through. I have an A in lecture, but I'm barely getting by in lab. I missed ONE lab and it just seems I can't get caught back up.

    I'm already in my nursing program and I'm acing assessment and pharmacology...why micro lab is killing me is beyond me

    My understanding is a C looks better on your transcript than a W...I guess they figure you stuck it out instead of giving up AGAIN.
  4. by   Owney
    Quote from truesn
    Halfmoon, I'm taking micro now so I understand what you're going through. I have an A in lecture, but I'm barely getting by in lab. I missed ONE lab and it just seems I can't get caught back up.

    I'm already in my nursing program and I'm acing assessment and pharmacology...why micro lab is killing me is beyond me

    My understanding is a C looks better on your transcript than a W...I guess they figure you stuck it out instead of giving up AGAIN.
    Halfmoon, (Great Name! In ER it means a patient is displaying one buttock!)

    Getting behind in science labs is always a problem. That happened to me when, was at a JC studying Chem. They did have make-up sessions, but I was so turned off to Chem that I never did them. The problem with missing a scheduled lab is that the lab is set up for a specific lesson. I remember my zoology and anatomy labs that were set up, and if you missed any session, you were SOL.

    If you intend to finish the course, you may be able to schedule make up lab sessions, if you ask about them.

    I took micro as part of my pre-reqs at the same JC where I got my ADN. A fellow student told me about an instructor who gave graded by how many journal articles you read and wrote synopses of. If you did 5, you got a C, 10, a B and 20, you got an A. Easiest A I ever got. The nursing program did not require the lab, although if you took it without the lab, you could not transfer your credit to a university for BSN credit. If I ever decide to get my BSN I will have to take another micro course. I have thought about it, so that I can go back and learn real micro that relates to my practice.

    Is this the only micro instructor in your school? Have you discussed classmates who are having the same problem? Best thing that happened to my nursing education was our study group. We met weekly either on campus or a members home.

    It's a shame that nursing education did away with the 3-year hospital programs. A colleague of mine told me about her program. Dawn was paired up with a "big sister" her first year. Her second year she was paired up with a "little sister" her second year. The pairings remained in place throughout, so it was the "see one, do one, teach one" med school/residency education that works extremely well. I think I have learned most of my nursing skills by paying attention on the the floor and then teaching it to orientees and other co-workers.

    Talk to a counselor in the Nursing Program Office. These folks are paid to give you useful advice. Ask her what you should do. She would be the best resource for information of whether a C is OK. She may also may come up with solutions to getting a better grade. If you cannot get help from the Nursing Office, try seeing a general counselor. You may have to go to a different school for help, but most of them do have some kind of counselling services. Try to find a school with a nursing program similar to yours.

    If this is the only instructor is your only option at your school, could you go to another college for micro? It is very inconvenient, and may be too expensive but do not rule it out. Do you know any other nurses? The older I get, the more I look for co-workers (almost everyone, ward clerks, housekeepers and NAs) who look more experienced than I am. I have gotten better advice about my career, and for my health, than ALL of the medical specialists I have ever seen.

    Although you may doubt it, you are NOT the only student in history to feel all alone with your trouble. I recall how all alone I felt when everybody in my intermediate algebra class "got it" during a lecture, but I didn't. I went to the library and found a programmed text, and after a night or two, I "got it." I was a pre-med, pre-law, biology, and social work dropout before I decided to get my degree in psychology. In every instance, when I changed my career track, it was because of failure or near-failure of a class.

    I learned almost nothing in my chemistry and especially micro classes. I read journal articles that were easy to understand, but had nothing to do with human pathology. Most of what I know about chemistry, micro, human biology, and pharmacology, I learned as a part of my practice.

    Halfmoon, I will remember you in my next prayer. I have been in your situation too many times to count. Yesterday I flunked ACLS by a 20 per cent score in a subject that I "aced" 20 times in as many years. I have been without any income for the past year. I need ACLS to get another job. Maybe God is telling me that I am not yet ready to go back to work. But, like you, I need to just dust my butt off and get right back on that horse.

    I feel that nursing is more of a calling than a profession. Every day of my practice convinces me that I was born to be a nurse. If you have been called, you will do whatever it takes.

    This board has helped me in ways that were inconceivable to me a year ago. Another nurse may have already posted better suggestions than mine.

    Hang in there Kid! You have been given not a barrier, but a challenge.

    My prayer will ask for helping you to get what you need, not necessarily what you THINK you need.

    Love, :kiss
  5. by   halfmoon
    Quote from Owney
    Halfmoon, (Great Name! In ER it means a patient is displaying one buttock!)

    Getting behind in science labs is always a problem. That happened to me when, was at a JC studying Chem. They did have make-up sessions, but I was so turned off to Chem that I never did them. The problem with missing a scheduled lab is that the lab is set up for a specific lesson. I remember my zoology and anatomy labs that were set up, and if you missed any session, you were SOL.

    If you intend to finish the course, you may be able to schedule make up lab sessions, if you ask about them.

    I took micro as part of my pre-reqs at the same JC where I got my ADN. A fellow student told me about an instructor who gave graded by how many journal articles you read and wrote synopses of. If you did 5, you got a C, 10, a B and 20, you got an A. Easiest A I ever got. The nursing program did not require the lab, although if you took it without the lab, you could not transfer your credit to a university for BSN credit. If I ever decide to get my BSN I will have to take another micro course. I have thought about it, so that I can go back and learn real micro that relates to my practice.

    Is this the only micro instructor in your school? Have you discussed classmates who are having the same problem? Best thing that happened to my nursing education was our study group. We met weekly either on campus or a members home.

    It's a shame that nursing education did away with the 3-year hospital programs. A colleague of mine told me about her program. Dawn was paired up with a "big sister" her first year. Her second year she was paired up with a "little sister" her second year. The pairings remained in place throughout, so it was the "see one, do one, teach one" med school/residency education that works extremely well. I think I have learned most of my nursing skills by paying attention on the the floor and then teaching it to orientees and other co-workers.

    Talk to a counselor in the Nursing Program Office. These folks are paid to give you useful advice. Ask her what you should do. She would be the best resource for information of whether a C is OK. She may also may come up with solutions to getting a better grade. If you cannot get help from the Nursing Office, try seeing a general counselor. You may have to go to a different school for help, but most of them do have some kind of counselling services. Try to find a school with a nursing program similar to yours.

    If this is the only instructor is your only option at your school, could you go to another college for micro? It is very inconvenient, and may be too expensive but do not rule it out. Do you know any other nurses? The older I get, the more I look for co-workers (almost everyone, ward clerks, housekeepers and NAs) who look more experienced than I am. I have gotten better advice about my career, and for my health, than ALL of the medical specialists I have ever seen.

    Although you may doubt it, you are NOT the only student in history to feel all alone with your trouble. I recall how all alone I felt when everybody in my intermediate algebra class "got it" during a lecture, but I didn't. I went to the library and found a programmed text, and after a night or two, I "got it." I was a pre-med, pre-law, biology, and social work dropout before I decided to get my degree in psychology. In every instance, when I changed my career track, it was because of failure or near-failure of a class.

    I learned almost nothing in my chemistry and especially micro classes. I read journal articles that were easy to understand, but had nothing to do with human pathology. Most of what I know about chemistry, micro, human biology, and pharmacology, I learned as a part of my practice.

    Halfmoon, I will remember you in my next prayer. I have been in your situation too many times to count. Yesterday I flunked ACLS by a 20 per cent score in a subject that I "aced" 20 times in as many years. I have been without any income for the past year. I need ACLS to get another job. Maybe God is telling me that I am not yet ready to go back to work. But, like you, I need to just dust my butt off and get right back on that horse.

    I feel that nursing is more of a calling than a profession. Every day of my practice convinces me that I was born to be a nurse. If you have been called, you will do whatever it takes.

    This board has helped me in ways that were inconceivable to me a year ago. Another nurse may have already posted better suggestions than mine.

    Hang in there Kid! You have been given not a barrier, but a challenge.

    My prayer will ask for helping you to get what you need, not necessarily what you THINK you need.

    Love, :kiss

    Thank you for caring so much. I really need positive feedback. I will try to hang in there. I really want to get into nursing school. I do know however that more than 1/3 of the class, in micro is failing, 1/3 are getting A's and the rest of us are in between. I do know that the instructor does have a reputation for being very hard.
    Well I will keep you informed.
    Thanks again.
    halfmoon
  6. by   luckyladyore
    Quote from halfmoon
    Hi I'm new at this so please bare with me. I was wondering if anyone could answer this? I am almost done with all of my prerequisites for nursing school, except for micro. I have attempted micro 2 times. I dropped once and recieved a W. And I am thinking about dropping again. The problem is that most of these micro teachers are so bad at teaching and if you have a full-time job, it is almost impossible to keep up. I always get the worst teachers. So my question is, should I drop again, i am not doing so well in the class, and I am afraid if I drop nursing schools will look at how many W's I have. Or should I stick with it and try for a C. But is a C good enough?
    If anyone could offer some advice that would be great.
    Thanks
    halfmoon:imbar
    Never give up! I failed alot of test but it never meant I couldnt do better STUDY MORE that type of class may require 4 hrs of studying so you better give up something also if it helps I have 50 credits towards nursing I started off doing the 2 plus 2 (CommColl/University=Bachelors degree) so ive experienced AP1&2 OH MY GOD will I make it out YES I DID......with a C but I passed just like every body else you can always pull up your grades to a B focus on passing!!!!! THATS WHAT COUNTS NOT QUITTING your not ill
    this is what NURSING is about:chuckle .I LOVE the adrenalin when I know that I must do my best!
  7. by   Sheri257
    Just FYI: At my school a C is definitely better than a W. If you have two W's (or anything less than a C in science courses) they won't take you.

    So, I'd stick it out and get that C, if you already have one W.

  8. by   amoymak
    Will your school accept a C in micro? If they will, then a C is good enough- in my opinion anyway. Micro was a tough course for me. I also had a difficult teacher. I came out with a C t which was acceptable at my school. having recently graduated from school, I can understand what you are facing.stay strong and good luck!!
  9. by   Owney
    Quote from amoymak
    Will your school accept a C in micro? If they will, then a C is good enough- in my opinion anyway. Micro was a tough course for me. I also had a difficult teacher. I came out with a C t which was acceptable at my school. having recently graduated from school, I can understand what you are facing.stay strong and good luck!!
    Yeah, if a C will get you into the program that is enough.

    Every medical school class has a name for the graduate with the lowest score, "Doctor."

    When you are accepted into a program set your sites on passing boards. If your nursing instructors are any good, they will tell you when they are teaching to boards. If you concentrate on learning to pass boards, your nursing school grades should take care of themselves.

    Hang in there, it's worth it! If you have been called to be a nurse, you can do it.

    Love, :kiss
  10. by   amoymak
    ditto
  11. by   halfmoon
    Hi thanks so much for all your advice. I may have to take my chances and drop anyway. I have sooo much that Im dealing with in my personal life right now. I may just take micro this summer. I will just apply to every nursing school that exists if I have to. Thanks again, and ill take any advice on nursing schools that anyone has.

    halfmoon

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