New grad in ER

  1. Hi! I'm a new grad in an ER in a MA hospital. I decided to join today because I had the worst day ever in my 2 month long nursing career. I keep thinking, "Am I really cut out for this?" People think I'm doing really well, but there's so much I don't know. What if I make a mistake that kills someone? I know people go through this. I guess I'm just looking for reassurance. Thanks. kali
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  2. 14 Comments

  3. by   sirI
    Quote from kali3272
    Hi! I'm a new grad in an ER in a MA hospital. I decided to join today because I had the worst day ever in my 2 month long nursing career. I keep thinking, "Am I really cut out for this?" People think I'm doing really well, but there's so much I don't know. What if I make a mistake that kills someone? I know people go through this. I guess I'm just looking for reassurance. Thanks. kali
    Hello and Welcome to Allnurses.com

    Great to have you with us. Yes, many have this same fear. You will with experience gain more and more confidence. Hang in there!! And, stay here for support and great informaton along the way.:wink2:
  4. by   Jessy_RN
    Welcome to the site and enjoy your stay .
  5. by   luvltc
    Welcome!!

    Lots of people have fear starting out. Just take it one day at a time and I'm sure you will do fine.
  6. by   Thunderwolf
  7. by   ER_Jen
    Kali,
    I feel the same way! I'm a new grad working in the ER as well and I will be on my own in two days. I have no idea how I'm going to handle things by myself. I'm freaking out. I did an "externship" in an ER and I loved it, which swayed my decision to go into the ER after I graduated, but things are totally different when you are an RN. It's just so much responsibility! Hang in there...I'm sure we'll be ok, but it's definitely a steep learning curve! Good luck!

    Jen
  8. by   CHATSDALE
    you dont remember when you learned to walk
    you probably don't even remember when you couldn't read
    but you learned to use both skills and build it up to serve you well..
    nursing is pretty much the same way, you will learn and gain confidence
    good luck
  9. by   caliotter3
    both to kali back in 05 and to Jen now. Hope everything goes well for both of you.
  10. by   collegemom1961
    Hi,
    I'm a new grad scheduled to start ER in Feb. Do you feel that it would have been better to start on a med surg floor and then move to ER? Any ideas from other nurses?
  11. by   patrick1rn
    If you want to start in the ER, then start in the ER. Understand that you will have to still study when you get home at night, EKGs, ACLS, PALS, Emergency Drugs and even routine drugs.
    It is good to be nervous
  12. by   mind_numbed
    As you know by now, school is school and work is work. In school, they really tend to teach in the "perfect world". I look as nursing school to be a basic set of tools that you learn. Your real education comes from your experience working. Nothing is perfect and I think it is one of the downfall in nursing programs. Patrick1rn is right, it is good to be nervous, it makes you better and allows for you to realize things you feel you need to improve. You passed school, you have a job: you have what it takes to be great. you just have to find your confidence. Remember, you don't have to know every answer, you just have to know where to find it.
  13. by   diane227
    As a manager I have hired new grads in the ED. However I tried to screen them carefully to try to determine if they would be able to fit it. Most were at the top of their class at graduation and most just had that determination knowing what they wanted to do. The other thing that would always impress me was when they would say they were scared. This is good because it is important to know what you don't know. With the internet it is so easy now to look things up but it was not that way before. I would put them through ACSL as soon as possible and after one year they took TNCC and PALS. They did not go near the triage desk until after at least 6 months and most of the time it was a year. Orientation was about 2 months long, included classroom and time on the unit. This was a big ED with about 350 patient visits daily. You had to be able to hit the ground running in some respect. The thing that all the successful new grads did was to keep on reading and learning. This was one of the key aspects to their success. We also tried to get them certified CEN after about 2 years.
  14. by   ephelis
    Hi Diane227, I just passed my NCLEX last week. I'm 31 years of age. I'm a doctor in the Philippines. I don't have any idea about the application here in the US. All the hospitals I checked requires experience. I would like to ask some advice regarding application. I'm very interested in ER/Intensive Care but I don't have any experience. I will get the BSL certification next week. Do I need to get ACLS before applying to any hospitals?

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