Just an LVN/LPN! HA!

  1. Hello all! I am new to the site...but just could not resist when I saw the conversation about being "just an LVN". I would like to share a little bit about myself first. I was a LVN/LPN for many years....like 15 I guess before I choose to go back to nursing school. I am now an RN working in a small 48 bed rural facility and am now the ED Director as well as the Trauma Coordinator. On of my favorite stories to share with my staff is about baking a cake...it takes more than just the icing to make a cake. You must have all the ingredients...the sugar, flour, eggs etc....to make it successful and to make it good and tasty. You see our jobs are the same...it takes ALL of us to make it successfull. Not only from the CNA's, but to housekeeping, office personnel, maintanance etc... Lets all try working withoug housekeeping and see where we are...HELLO! This is why they call it "TEAM" work...because it takes all of to make the cake work. I have the highest respect for every single person who works in our hospital...trust me try only having the icing...like only the administrator in the hospital....will that work....I hardly think so. So when someone tells you that your are "just an LVN" try telling them "yes that is correct and I am part of the cake"...make them wonder. But always KNOW in yourself that you are a main part of the ingredients. Oh, and by the way....I work with MANY LVN's whom I would rather have take care of me than some of the RN's that I work with. I am very proud that I was an LVN for many years, still maintain my license as a matter of fact. So the moral of the story...who cares what anyone else thinks...know that you are a vital part of that cake! I am sure that many of your patients know that also...and arn't they the ones that count. Hmmmmm....maybe they are the icing?.....
    •  
  2. 8 Comments

  3. by   proudmommielpn
    Well said traumacoordinator! I couldn't have said it better myself! Proud LPN of 3 years!
  4. by   RainDreamer
    Hi and welcome to allnurses!!
  5. by   RN34TX
    Great post traumacoordinator!
    Reading the 'just an LPN/LVN" stuff has brought back some memories of things I'd almost forgotten about but can share with humor today.

    I told my supervisor at one facility I'd worked at that I was running to the blood bank to pick up some blood for my patient and wanted to be sure that she'd be there when I got back to co-sign and hang it for my patient (LPN's were not allowed to actually hang the blood at this place)
    She told me "Oh no you can't get blood at the blood bank, you need to have a nurse do that."
    I looked at her funny and pointed to my nametag and she said "Well I mean an RN nurse."
    Guess that told me what she thought of LPN's.
  6. by   SophieMae
    When I worked as a CNA a doctor mistook me for a "nurse" as I charted on our patient. An RN that had told me repeatedly in front of others how valuable I was to her and the patients and that she trusted my judgements completely, spoke to the doctor saying........"What are you talking to her for, she's just a CNA!" The doctor was embarrassed. I guess speaking to a CNA was even beneath him.
    I pray that I will always remember this incident and many, many others when I am the "nurse". I know that in moments of stress.....please and thank you may not be there, but I intend to reassure my valuable co-worker and team mate as often as I can that we are a team and one needs the other.
    I also might add that if I am standing at bedside and our patient wants the bedpan, I wont run to find my team-mate to do.
    Thank you.
  7. by   HarryPotter
    Hi all. I have the higihest respect for everyone I work with. As a RN, the only thing I have ever wondered about, and I mean this seriously, not as a snub to LVNs, is why did you decide to go for a LVN (which takes, i believe 18 months), rather than a 2 yr. RN. A RN makes more money. Thats all.
  8. by   swatte
    Quote from traumacoordinator
    Hello all! I am new to the site...but just could not resist when I saw the conversation about being "just an LVN". I would like to share a little bit about myself first. I was a LVN/LPN for many years....like 15 I guess before I choose to go back to nursing school. I am now an RN working in a small 48 bed rural facility and am now the ED Director as well as the Trauma Coordinator. On of my favorite stories to share with my staff is about baking a cake...it takes more than just the icing to make a cake. You must have all the ingredients...the sugar, flour, eggs etc....to make it successful and to make it good and tasty. You see our jobs are the same...it takes ALL of us to make it successfull. Not only from the CNA's, but to housekeeping, office personnel, maintanance etc... Lets all try working withoug housekeeping and see where we are...HELLO! This is why they call it "TEAM" work...because it takes all of to make the cake work. I have the highest respect for every single person who works in our hospital...trust me try only having the icing...like only the administrator in the hospital....will that work....I hardly think so. So when someone tells you that your are "just an LVN" try telling them "yes that is correct and I am part of the cake"...make them wonder. But always KNOW in yourself that you are a main part of the ingredients. Oh, and by the way....I work with MANY LVN's whom I would rather have take care of me than some of the RN's that I work with. I am very proud that I was an LVN for many years, still maintain my license as a matter of fact. So the moral of the story...who cares what anyone else thinks...know that you are a vital part of that cake! I am sure that many of your patients know that also...and arn't they the ones that count. Hmmmmm....maybe they are the icing?.....
    Thank you for your words of wisdom. You would not believe the people who ask if I'm an LPN or an RN. When I say LPN, they say "oh" as if we are not as well educated, etc. I found PN school to be very challenging. I have also heard becoming an RN (Associated degree) just builds on the knowledge you gain in LPN school anyway. I have also found that the best RNs were LPNs a number of years first. Hopefully the stigma associated with "just being an LPN" will fade away as the profession gaines some much needed respect. It would also help if doctors were a wee bit more respectful.
  9. by   swatte
    To Harry Potter,

    My program was 14 months long, which is actually long for my region of the country. My program ended with a diploma, most programs around here are 9-12 months and end with a certificate (I know, what's the difference). The deciding factor for me was amount of time I could afford to be off work. I plan to go back for my RN while working as an LPN. Do RNs have the same stigma when they have an associate's degree as opposed to a BSN? My theory is that it doesn't matter because the state boards are the same. I know some companies will not hire an RN unless it is a BSN. To me it's all irrelevant. It's common sense, how you approach nursing, your willingness to continue learning, and respect for all nurses who do their job within their scope of practice. I have known nurse practitioners who have a greater knowledge than a lot of doctors simply because they were nurses first. It's all a matter of perspective.
  10. by   HarryPotter
    Quote from swatte
    To Harry Potter,

    My program was 14 months long, which is actually long for my region of the country. My program ended with a diploma, most programs around here are 9-12 months and end with a certificate (I know, what's the difference). The deciding factor for me was amount of time I could afford to be off work. I plan to go back for my RN while working as an LPN. Do RNs have the same stigma when they have an associate's degree as opposed to a BSN? My theory is that it doesn't matter because the state boards are the same. I know some companies will not hire an RN unless it is a BSN. To me it's all irrelevant. It's common sense, how you approach nursing, your willingness to continue learning, and respect for all nurses who do their job within their scope of practice. I have known nurse practitioners who have a greater knowledge than a lot of doctors simply because they were nurses first. It's all a matter of perspective.
    Thanks for your reply. I thought a LVN course was 18 months. Can see how the amt. ot time could make a difference.
    As to AA vs. BSN, I have a AA and it has never stopped me from getting a job as a RN, though if your looking for a managerial position, they uaually require an BSN.:hatparty:

Must Read Topics


close