It's hard to imagine it, can you help me to?

  1. I am a 44 year old pre-nursing student. I am just finishing up my last class and will only have to focus on clinicals in the fall of 2007. I am concerned that my age my hinder my ability as an RN. As an RN, what can I expect to physcially do? How is the shift work...I have never done it before. What is most challenging about the job? Sometimes I think that I am crazy for attempting this, but I have done very well so far and have enjoyed all of the science classes. I need some encouragement as well as candidness. Please share your thoughts!
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  2. 6 Comments

  3. by   traumaRUs
    Hi and welcome. Nope you're not too old at all! Especially if you are in good health, you can expect to work at least another 20 years - plenty of time.
  4. by   Tweety
    What is you general health? Do you exercise, are you a healthy weight? How is your back?

    Take care of yourself and you can be nurse without any trouble. I'm precept a new grad who is in her 40s and she's doing fine!
  5. by   Daytonite
    The average age of the largest group of working RNs right now is in the 40's, so you are going to be in the majority. I always found the decisions and judgments that had to be made the most challenging, but that's me.

    I am completing a paper on zero lifting policies right now. It is the latest "rage" in healthcare. Too many nurses in the past have fallen by the side from permanent disability due to back injuries suffered while lifting patients, me included. And, the workman's comp system has failed them badly. Texas and Washington state have passed laws requiring hospitals to set up patient handling committees and obtain more patient lifting equipment. Massachusetts has a similar law before it's legislature. I believe New York and Ohio are also trying to pass similar laws. John Conyers introduced a bill to the U.S. house of representatives in September that would make this whole issue a federal law if the bill passes. I can give a link to information on a lift team in operation at one large mid-west hospital. Lifting and moving patients is probably the hardest physical thing there is to do on the job as a nurse. And, it seems that now that has become a HUGE issue. I have seen posts on the forums where young nursing school graduates were asking to find hospitals that had lift teams and zero lift policies to look to for their first nursing jobs. The country is getting educated to the fact that good body mechanics just isn't enough to save a nurses back anymore.

    So, to get back to your question about what you are expected to do physically? Well, next to lifting and moving patients, probably the most challenging is being able to stand on your feet for 8 or 12 hours. My advice, after 30 years, is to wear good support hose and a good pair of orthopedic shoes that will be comfortable to stand in with arch supports you put in them to minimize the chance of getting plantar fasciitis. 44 is not old. If you're worried about stamina, sign up at a gym and start doing a regular daily workout.

    Welcome to allnurses!
  6. by   STACT,LPN
    I AM 38 YEARS OLD AND STUDYING FOR MY RN, I AM CURRENTLY A LPN OF 5 1/2 YRS, YOUR NOT TO OLD GO FOR WHAT YOU WANT, I WAS WONDERING THE SAME THING ABOUT MYSELF, DO I WANT IT? IS IT WORTH IT? WHY DO I WANT MORE? I JUST DO! I LIKE MY JOB, I HAVE TEENAGE CHILDREN, I REALLY WANT TO DO THIS FOR MYSELF, IT IS JUST GETTING AND KEEPING THE MOTIVATION AFTER A ALREADY LONG DAY AT WORK, DON'T THINK YOU CAN'T DO IT, YOU CAN.
  7. by   CHATSDALE
    i liked the idea of starting a work-out program
    there is just as much physical as mental in nursing and if you work out or even if you just increase your walking time it will make a world of difference in how tired you are at the end of the day
  8. by   NRSKarenRN
    Lots of members here nursing students in their 40's and 50's, even few 60yo!

    Check out our: Pre-Nursing Student Forum

    Age is all in the mind...

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