I'm not a nurse but hope to be one day and I have some questions for you all. | allnurses

I'm not a nurse but hope to be one day and I have some questions for you all.

  1. 2 Hi my name is Jessica. I have just a couple of questions. I have always wanted to become a nurse, that is my dream. When I was just 16, I had my first child, who was premature and I missed a lot of school for that reason. Since I missed a lot of school I just decided to get my GED. Some one told me since I have my GED and not an actual high school diploma then I wouldn't be able to be accepted in to a schoool. Is that true? How do I go through the whole process in becoming a nurse? I want to have a BSN. How long is school? 4 years right? Is that including 2 years of "core" classes is what I've heard. I apologize if I am posting in the wrong place, I just figured it would be nice to get answers from people who know what they are talking about . One last question what are good schools in georgia that have a nusing program? Thank you in advance for any answers/replies that y'all give me..
  2. Visit  jesstapia profile page

    About jesstapia

    Joined Oct '12; Posts: 2; Likes: 3.

    19 Comments so far...

  3. Visit  Silverdragon102 profile page
    0
    Hi Jessica and welcome to the site

    Couple of forums that maybe of some benefit for you

    Student forum where there are a few forums that may help you
    Nursing career forum
    State nursing program discussion forum
  4. Visit  nursel56 profile page
    1
    Just want to add my welcome to allnurses, Jessica! Best wishes to you as you explore your future career options!

    bigsick_littlesick likes this.
  5. Visit  Pleigh33 profile page
    0
    Hey Jessica! I am pretty familiar with the process. I am taking my last two prerequisite courses right now and am waiting to hear back from kennesaw states nursing program to see whether I have been accepted or not. I can say you having your GED instead of a diploma should be absolutely NO problem. They are not going to be looking at your high school records. You should double check with an advisor but I would not worry about that at all. The most important thing is what you do from here on out. Nursing school's are very competitive to get into and that means you are going to really have to work hard and get great grades in all of your classes so you have a competitive gpa. I am a single mother and it has been hard at times but like you becoming a nurse is my dream and although i was not the best student in high school I have done very well in college. I did the majority of my prerequisite classes at Georgia perimeter college and I had an absolutely amazing experience there. It is a lot cheaper than most other schools and the teachers I had have absolutely changed my life. I transferred into kennesaw this semester and I really love it but am grateful I started at gpc. For public schools with a Bsn in nursing KSU and ga state univ are the only 2 i know of in the Atlanta area. There are several more private colleges that have Bsn programs but it is more expensive, but a lot of them are a little easier to get into. Hope this info helps and I would highly recommend talking to an advisor at one of the schools I mentioned, to get some solid information. I learned a lot of this from talking with people and reading websites like this one, but there can definitely be some strange stuff circulated (like someone telling you you can't get in if youhave yr GED). So it may be good to get it straight from the horses mouth. Best of luck to you!!!
    Last edit by Pleigh33 on Oct 8, '12 : Reason: Clarity
  6. Visit  KelRN215 profile page
    0
    Quote from Pleigh33
    Hey Jessica! I am pretty familiar with the process. I am taking my last two prerequisite courses right now and am waiting to hear back from kennesaw states nursing program to see whether I have been accepted or not. I can say you having your GED instead of a diploma should be absolutely NO problem. They are not going to be looking at your high school records. You should double check with an advisor but I would not worry about that at all. The most important thing is what you do from here on out. Nursing school's are very competitive to get into and that means you are going to really have to work hard and get great grades in all of your classes so you have a competitive gpa. I am a single mother and it has been hard at times but like you becoming a nurse is my dream and although i was not the best student in high school I have done very well in college. I did the majority of my prerequisite classes at Georgia perimeter college and I had an absolutely amazing experience there. It is a lot cheaper than most other schools and the teachers I had have absolutely changed my life. I transferred into kennesaw this semester and I really love it but am grateful I started at gpc. For public schools with a Bsn in nursing KSU and ga state univ are the only 2 i know of in the Atlanta area. There are several more private colleges that have Bsn programs but it is more expensive, but a lot of them are a little easier to get into. Hope this info helps and I would highly recommend talking to an advisor at one of the schools I mentioned, to get some solid information. I learned a lot of this from talking with people and reading websites like this one, but there can definitely be some strange stuff circulated (like someone telling you you can't get in if youhave yr GED). So it may be good to get it straight from the horses mouth. Best of luck to you!!!
    This isn't really true. The OP wants to enter into a BSN program. Traditional university/BSN programs most definitely DO look at high school records. I didn't take any pre-reqs before I entered into nursing school at the age of 18, my acceptance was based off of: high school transcripts, recommendations from high school teachers and SAT scores. Having a GED and not a high school diploma may or may not affect you, depending on the school. I can say with some degree of certainty that there were no students in my program who did not graduate from high school but I did work with some nurses who had a GED as their educational background.

    OP, a traditional BSN program is 4 years and yes, that does include roughly 2 years of core classes. The curriculum will vary slightly depending on the university. I am not familiar with any programs in Georgia.
  7. Visit  Indy profile page
    0
    You can apply to a technical college in your area, and there are some advantages. First of all they would test you and if you are in need of remedial classes, they will let you know. So you take them if you need them, then move on to your math, english, etc. If the BSN program you choose is a public university, they will be able to transfer credits from your core classes. You could take some of the core classes or all of them, at a technical school so the tuition is cheap. Then start applying for the university programs.

    I will say that Associate Degree Nurses generally don't have problems finding jobs in Georgia. I hear good things about their programs, and I am from Athens Tech. My math was weak so it took me some time to take nothing but math, so my path was 3 years to get a 2 year degree, but it worked out okay.
  8. Visit  mama_d profile page
    1
    Have you considered looking into if ant community colleges in your area have agreements with 4-year colleges as far as transferring? Where I'm at, the local CCs have it set up so that the vast majority of their classes, including all of the core classes, transfer to the state university system with no issues. Even if you aren't interested in getting your ADN and want to go straight for the BSN, you could get the core classes out of the way at a cheaper price while building a solid college GPA.

    So far as I'm aware, having a GED doesn't automatically disqualify you from being able to go for your nursing degree...it's designed to be considered the equivalent of a high school diploma in that it says you have achieved a certain level of education. How admissions offices actually look at them might vary somewhat though. The best way to find out is to determine what schools you're interested in and call or go there and speak to an admissions advisor.

    I don't know about GA, but my state's BON website has a list of all accredited nursing schools in the state, recent pass rates, and contact info for each school. I'd recommend checking to see if GA has something similar, then sit down with Google maps amd figure out what schools are feasible to consider geographically, and go from there.
    NoonieRN likes this.
  9. Visit  Elladora profile page
    3
    Quote from mama_d
    Have you considered looking into if ant community colleges in your area have agreements with 4-year colleges as far as transferring?
    Excellent, excellent idea! It will save you time (and money) in the long run.

    As far as having a GED, a couple of my classmates had GEDs and they are now nurses. I don't think that will hinder your chances of being accepted.
    mama_d, NoonieRN, and DawnJ like this.
  10. Visit  PDowling profile page
    0
    Jessica, I know two nurses that had a GED rather than a "regular" high school diploma. My advise to you is to do atleast a year of pre-req classes before you even apply to any program. Put in the time to acheive the highest grades possible. If you have a great GPA after your first year of college ... your high school transcrips will not matter as much. Good luck to you! Follow that dream and make your child proud!
  11. Visit  GitanoRN profile page
    0
    Welcome to the site, as I wish you the best in all of your future endeavors...Aloha~
  12. Visit  BSwasBS profile page
    2
    Hi Jessica!!!
    Kudos to you for pursuing your higher education goals. I know for a fact that you can pursue a BSN in Georgia with a GED. You can attend private AND public institutions. There are people at Yale and Harvard who have GED's so UGA and GaTech are no brainers. DO NOT EVER give up on your dreams just because of what ONE or TWO negative people try to say to you. YOU can do it. Go FOR IT and keep us posted!!!!!
    Pleigh33 and applewhitern like this.
  13. Visit  ArrowRN profile page
    0
    Look there are a few ways to get your BSN. I won't listen to the clowns who say you need high school diploma, because you don't. I have a GED, and it is not stopping me, and having a GED does not mean you not smart or at the same level as those with a highschool diploma...besides when you get your BSN, it wont matter.

    Anyways,don't know if anyone explained it this way but, The 3 main routes to get a BSN are:

    1. Go to community/state college first, get your AA-Pre-nursing major, with prerequisites included then transfer to a University for your BSN. This is my plan and I already got my AA degree.

    2. complete your ADN (Associates RN program) become an RN, go to work, then later complete the RN-BSN at a University.

    3. enter generic BSN program right out of high school to a University as a freshman.

    The route you may not be able to do, is #3...generic BSN entering as a freshman from highschool...that is probably the only one you wont be able to do,only because you would need to have your highschool transcripts, GPA, SAT's and other highschool science courses completed. A private University might waive some of these requirements and take your GED, but you will be looking at very high expenses at the end of 4 years.
    The first 2 routes (1. and 2.) you can do with no problem by having your GED, the choice depends on your lifestyle and accommodations, length of time depends on how long you take to complete the prerequisites, the actual core BSN will take 1.5 to 2 years to complete. If you are in no rush to work and have accommodations and no bills etc, I'd go with plan 1. it will take 4 years if you do it all fulltime, depending on family income, most if not all of it will be covered via financial aid. If doing this you will want to keep in contact with the University you plan to transfer too and a transfer advisor, to ensure that the state/community college courses you are taking are equivalent to the University course of studies and are accepted when you transfer. Choice 2. is also covered by fianacial aid(depending on your family income) and it is the quickest way to become an RN, so they say, but really its only 3-6months shorter than the BSN if you count the time it takes to complete the prerequisites. Hope this helps.
  14. Visit  amygarside profile page
    0
    Welcome and congratulations on your choice of career. I hope you will be able to find the best nursing course that will work for you. Wishing you the best.


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