Fire fighter/scientist considering nursing

  1. Hi, I was a fire fighter/emt-B for about 9 years, and worked as a scientist for a while, but the thrill of emergencies never left me and considering doing a bridge program or something to get into nursing - specifically ER. Worried about some of the other topics in the 'men' section where it said nursing sucks, the field is dying etc etc.

    Thanks if anyone reads!
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  2. 4 Comments

  3. by   meanmaryjean
    Nursing doesn't suck.

    The field is not dying because there are always people trying to.
  4. by   drollette
    So, I just became a nurse and I am beginning residency in a few days so my perspective is limited, but, my wife is a nurse (7+ years), and I've worked as a Tech in the ED for the past two years. There is mobility with nursing. If you have one year of nursing experience you can bounce around like crazy (Med/Surg-->ED, ICU-->Organ Donation[TOSA] etc.). And nursing is a field where having 4 jobs in 4 years isn't something that limits your options. In short, while it sounds like you have the personality and experience to thrive in the ED, if for some reason you didn't like it, you could fit in to a different specialty. I think another thing to consider is that just because you work in an ED, doesn't mean you are in a stereotypical trauma center that is always super slammed, there are crazy differences from facility to facility, city to city, or even shift to shift.

    Hopefully this is helpful food for thought.
  5. by   Anthony11
    Quote from drollette
    So, I just became a nurse and I am beginning residency in a few days so my perspective is limited, but, my wife is a nurse (7+ years), and I've worked as a Tech in the ED for the past two years. There is mobility with nursing. If you have one year of nursing experience you can bounce around like crazy (Med/Surg-->ED, ICU-->Organ Donation[TOSA] etc.). And nursing is a field where having 4 jobs in 4 years isn't something that limits your options. In short, while it sounds like you have the personality and experience to thrive in the ED, if for some reason you didn't like it, you could fit in to a different specialty. I think another thing to consider is that just because you work in an ED, doesn't mean you are in a stereotypical trauma center that is always super slammed, there are crazy differences from facility to facility, city to city, or even shift to shift.

    Hopefully this is helpful food for thought.
    How much power/choice do nurses have? Are they are the complete beck and call of a doctor? I ask because in EMS it was pretty much you and your team alone and you did what you could or they died.
  6. by   drollette
    In a sense, like in EMS, there are protocols to guide decision making in the hospital setting. In addition to the authorities that regulate nursing practice, what nurses can and can't do in the hospital setting is determined by the medical director (an MD). So, while much of what nurses do requires "orders" I don't think that hospitals today have a bizarre authority complex where doctors boss nurses around. When a multidisciplinary group of people congregate to resuscitate someone there is a flurry of action, rather than a chorus of "What now doc?" There is definitely a different type of autonomy in EMS than in Nursing (i.e. airway management, needle decompression) but at the end of the day there is an authority in both fields that dictates scope of practice.

    Hopefully an experienced nurse can chime in and leave a better comment to help out.

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