Career change?

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    I joined this website for enlightenment. I have been teaching High School science for 5 years. I graduated with a Bachelors of Science in Biology. Teaching is not fun or challenging anymore. So I am debating: teach or go to nursing school. I love helping people, I am caring and I see very little reward from my high school students. My biggest concern is that I am a new Mom, I have an 8 month old at home. I don't know if the vacations are worth sticking out teaching if I am miserable.
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  3. 10 Comments so far...

  4. 1
    Welcome to allnurses, Teresa! We have many second-career students and nurses here, so lots of experience to read about. Best wishes to you!
    Teresa_vasilia likes this.
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    Are there any other former teachers out there that can offer insight?
  6. 1
    Life is too short, but it's NEVER too late to reach your dreams and pursue happiness.
    Nurse2BeInGA likes this.
  7. 4
    Why do you want to be a nurse? That is the most important question to ask yourself regarding a career change.
    Look to making a change within your teaching career; if you stick with teaching, perhaps you can teach another (easier) age group, rather than high school students.

    The reality of nursing is that your first job may be working nights for a year. You will likely work every other weekend and every other Holiday if you work in a hospital. You'll work 12 hour shifts (which typically are 13-14 hours with minimal breaks and sometimes no lunch. You will find that despite your caring for your patients and families, the same isn't returned; people who are sick are not always on their best behavior.

    You're also going to go from "experienced" teacher to "newbie" nurse... it's a huge mindset change.

    Think long and hard about this change.
  8. 0
    I taught school for ten years and decided that that was not how I wanted to spend the rest of my career. However, I am single with no children. It was pretty easy for me to make that decision, with the exception of the major financial burden of quitting my job at the end of last school year and the uncertainty of unemployment (not from the government, but actually not having a job and income) until the end of nursing school. The big difference between nursing and teaching will be that, besides the emotional factor, you will work your shift and go home. As a teacher, your day does not end at the "teacher bell." You have faculty meetings that run past that time at least once a week, you take students on school-sponsored trips or go to required professional development conferences on your own time, you grade papers and call/e-mail parents every night, and don't forget the parent night events that you are required to go to. My "vacations" were often spent on school activities that were more often than not not reimbursed by the district.
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    I taught for a year before I realized that it was not for me. I always wanted to teach, and my methodology teachers always said I would end up being a star teacher. Then I got my first job, and I was like, "this is teaching?"

    I ended up becoming a CNA before I decided to become a nurse.

    People change careers all the time. I have a classmate who graduated with a BA in English and worked for non profits. Then she went to trade school and became a carpenter. Now she's in school for nursing. Each job is so different, but it's a way to find your niche.

    Another great thing about being a nurse is that there's so much you can do. If you browse the specialties on this site, you'll see that there are nurses in all settings, working with all populations, and doing all sorts of jobs. There are nurses who go to vocational school and nurses with doctorates.

    There's a lot to explore, and this is the place to do it.
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    Hello, my girlfriend suggested that I join this website. I am also looking for a change in career and im in desperate need of advice. Im a 34 year old single parent with very little family or friends to help me. I have managed to build a successful career as a paralegal where I am making 75k-85k a year. I have always wanted to go to law school but have been too chicken to spend the money. plus, with the kids, I doubt I would have time to complete law school. I started looking into nursing becuase im trying to get into working in a hospital where I can work a night shift. this will help me tramendously with juggleing the kids during the day. However, I hear so many stories about people finishing nursing school and cant find a job. Im not sure if this nursing thing is the right direction. Can someone give some sound advice and enlightment into the whole nursing thing? I figured it would be a good switch for me becuase the starting salary will be about the same as im making now and I can work at night to help balance juggleing my 11 and 3 year old. please help. any advice you give me will be greatly appreciated. thanks
  11. 0
    Quote from ljean6150
    Hello, my girlfriend suggested that I join this website. I am also looking for a change in career and im in desperate need of advice. Im a 34 year old single parent with very little family or friends to help me. I have managed to build a successful career as a paralegal where I am making 75k-85k a year. I have always wanted to go to law school but have been too chicken to spend the money. plus, with the kids, I doubt I would have time to complete law school. I started looking into nursing becuase im trying to get into working in a hospital where I can work a night shift. this will help me tramendously with juggleing the kids during the day. However, I hear so many stories about people finishing nursing school and cant find a job. Im not sure if this nursing thing is the right direction. Can someone give some sound advice and enlightment into the whole nursing thing? I figured it would be a good switch for me becuase the starting salary will be about the same as im making now and I can work at night to help balance juggleing my 11 and 3 year old. please help. any advice you give me will be greatly appreciated. thanks
    Oh boy, after a 12 hour night shift you can't juggle anything, not sure that would be a good option, though I understand where you are coming from. Best of luck to you!
  12. 0
    Quote from ljean6150
    I have managed to build a successful career as a paralegal where I am making 75k-85k a year......Can someone give some sound advice and enlightment into the whole nursing thing? I figured it would be a good switch for me becuase the starting salary will be about the same as im making now and I can work at night to help balance juggleing my 11 and 3 year old. please help. any advice you give me will be greatly appreciated. thanks
    Where do you live? If it is not NYC (and I mean some parts; not all) or CA (again some parts; not all) or some other States that pay that much to New Grads, you will be taking a major pay cut of 30-50 K per year to become a new nurse. In other words, you will not be making anything close to 75-85K per year even with over time in most parts of this country.

    Also, the horror stories are real.... It will take some time working as a nurse (consistent and constant employment) to find a nursing job that is not horrific with a company that you will like. Such jobs have low turnover rates and require new hires to be experienced nurses. Unfortunately, you will not be considered an experienced nurse when you graduate; rather you will be a New Graduate Nurse and thus may not be employed right away.....

    In fact, imagine the possibility of being unemployed from nursing for 6 months to 2 years after you graduate.... If you have the finances to survive or can remain in your current career until you land your first nursing job, which I highly recommend, then go for the career change without hesitation! Otherwise, you may be better off becoming a Lawyer especially since deep-down-inside that is your true passion.

    By the way, I know of a few nurses who became lawyers after working as a nurse by the bedside. They too were single parents when they attended law school. Therefore, if you decide against nursing for law school, do not make any excuses. Attending nursing school as single parent is not easy or necessarily more doable then any other professional school. In other words, you can make it through law school as a single parent similar to making it through nursing school as a single parent if you just put your nose-to-the-grind and just-do-it. Good luck.
    Last edit by MBARNBSN on Jul 11, '13


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