working in the UK as a travel nurse

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    I am an American Registered Nurse. I am looking to do some temporary work in London. We refer to them as "travel RN's" over here. Do these agencies provide housing for you? What are the pro's and con's of working agency versus working directly for a hospital? I have 9 years of experience and my specialty is working Cardio-thoracic, open heart and heart transplant ICU, what level would I be. I saw that there are level D'd and level F's and I have no clue what that all means. Thank You!!!
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    Quote from conradrn
    I am an American Registered Nurse. I am looking to do some temporary work in London. We refer to them as "travel RN's" over here. Do these agencies provide housing for you? What are the pro's and con's of working agency versus working directly for a hospital? I have 9 years of experience and my specialty is working Cardio-thoracic, open heart and heart transplant ICU, what level would I be. I saw that there are level D'd and level F's and I have no clue what that all means. Thank You!!!
    Moved your thread to the International Forum since it is specific to working in another country as an RN and you will have to deal with immigration as well as licensure issues.

    You are also going to run into issues with licensure there right now, as well as being able to get a visa to work over there. There is a hiring freeze in place and we are only seeing working visas issued for those with sigificant experience in PICU or NICU areas.

    Also, how many years of schooling did you have for your RN? If only a two year program from the US, it will not meet the requirements for licensure there. You are going to need to have at least the BSN since their minimal level of training is a three year program.
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    I cannot answer questions regarding visas or immigration but I did work as a nurse specialist for a dialysis company and found when I travelled to London the units where heavily staffed with overseas nurses from numerous countries. Some of the nurses had been sponsered by the hospitals and they were provided with nurse accomodation - at a pretty high price - but they described it as that small and cramped that they could almost touch opposite walls with arms outstretched!
    There are agencies and the fact they you have experience in a speciality will be beneficial.
    I have pasted a website I have found that may provide you with some of the answers to your questions.
    As Regards pay - the NHS nurses are paid under T&Cs of Agenda for Change - this may give you some idea of what you can expect to be paid, I would look at the band 5 & 6, agency rates are generally higher than NHS + any nurse living in London does get an enhancement for compenaste for the high cost of living - it used to work out approx 2,000 ($4,000) per year.
    Hope this is of some benefit?

    Jane


    http://www.workgateways.com/job-medical-nursing.html
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    You will need to meet all NMC requirements as an overseas nurse and complete an ONP, looking at several months to go through the process and get a number but will not assist in obtaining a work permit
    suzanne4 likes this.
  7. 0
    Quote from LiverpoolJane
    I cannot answer questions regarding visas or immigration but I did work as a nurse specialist for a dialysis company and found when I travelled to London the units where heavily staffed with overseas nurses from numerous countries. Some of the nurses had been sponsered by the hospitals and they were provided with nurse accomodation - at a pretty high price - but they described it as that small and cramped that they could almost touch opposite walls with arms outstretched!
    There are agencies and the fact they you have experience in a speciality will be beneficial.
    I have pasted a website I have found that may provide you with some of the answers to your questions.
    As Regards pay - the NHS nurses are paid under T&Cs of Agenda for Change - this may give you some idea of what you can expect to be paid, I would look at the band 5 & 6, agency rates are generally higher than NHS + any nurse living in London does get an enhancement for compenaste for the high cost of living - it used to work out approx 2,000 ($4,000) per year.
    Hope this is of some benefit?

    Jane


    http://www.workgateways.com/job-medical-nursing.html

    How long ago did you work with nurses there from other countries? Things have changed significantly in the past year or two.

    But the bigger issue has to do with licensure, and the four year BSN is required for any of us to get licensed in the UK.
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    Suzanne, it was a few years ago 1999 - 2004 and I am sure things have changed in London as they have more locally. At that time there were nurse from Austalia, NZ, US, Canada and a lot form Jordon.
    As I said at the start of my reply I don't know anything about the visa / immigration process in the UK but was just trying to give an opinion of the high cost of living and accomodation (for little more than a broom cupboard) that he/she may face. It all seemed a bit grim to me when I spoke to these nurses, I don't think it was what they expected to find when they arrived in London.
    The website I attached as a link would hopefully direct to up to date advice as I understand that there are various types of visas depending country of birth/your ancestory etc.

    Jane
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    The UK is now under a hiring freeze, that is the point that I was trying to make. Things have changed significantly in the last two years in the UK, as well as across the entire EU.

    Thanks for your understanding on this.


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