working in nursing homes

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    With all the bad publicity that nursing homes have been getting lately do any of you feel reluctant to admit that you work in a home even though you know that your home has a good standard of care and is nothing like some of the homes that have been reported on?

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  2. 13 Comments...

  3. 0
    Yes, I worked at a nursing home that was highly rated. However, when I'd tell people I was a nurse, they'd ask where I worked and I'd tell them. They would usually frown, and say something like "Oh. Why don't you work in a hospital?"

    or "That must be boring."

    They believe in the media's depiction of nursing homes- tired, dusty old places where everyone sits around in a big tv room, while a white capped nurse lazily hands out med cups.

    They have no idea.
  4. 0
    I heard that before too except with regard to home health. Go figure.

    renerian
  5. 0
    Also, when I was a new grad LPN working on a skilled unit, a "state" inspector said to me "Why don't you go to work in a hospital? You shouldn't stay here just because it's easy."

    Can you say clueless?
  6. 0
    Quote from nightmare
    With all the bad publicity that nursing homes have been getting lately do any of you feel reluctant to admit that you work in a home even though you know that your home has a good standard of care and is nothing like some of the homes that have been reported on?
    I dont feel reluctant to admit to work in a Nursing Home - why should I? It is only narrow minded people who think all homes are bad anyway...It really annoys me that people think working in a nursing home is easy...NO..it is different yes but still needs the Nurse to use her skills....It is usually a lot harder as there is very little back up around when you need it...getting a GP out is a major incident in itself sometimes!!

    Sorry I could go on and on about this subject!!!
  7. 0
    [QUOTE=Hellllllo Nurse]Also, when I was a new grad LPN working on a skilled unit, a "state" inspector said to me "Why don't you go to work in a hospital? You shouldn't stay here just because it's easy."

    Can you say clueless?[/QUOTE

    I think the state inspector has the wrong idea of a nursing home...I worked hospital setting as graduate LPN, and am now agency LPN going to area LTC facilities. Nursing homes are anything but easy...with the larger assignment per nurse(usually LPN's), Rn's are usually delegated the charge position, which in itself is a hard job also....making sure everyone else is doing what they are required to do. You have all the treatments, meds, and answering the questions brought forth to you by family members, and assisting your aides when needed. Believe me....it isnt that easy, you just have to set a pace for yourself....and hope and pray that something doesnt pop up to screw your day ( or night ) up. I think they need to walk a mile or 2 in our shoes before making that statement. Guaranteed they won't be saying its easy anymore.
  8. 0
    We're still viewed as the "Cinderella" of nursing.I view it as a specialist subject,and a very demanding one at that.
    If the newspapers paid as much attention to the positive aspects as they do to the negative I'm sure that nursing homes would have a much higher profile than they do today.
    I work nights,One RGN and three carers to look after 35 residents.Many of them are up most of the night ,confused,agressive and need constant monitoring .We do not use chemical restraint and only a few of them are suitable for cotsides therefore we have to keep our wits about us.We do not sit all night sleeping or drink endless cups of coffee.We also have to be more observent in regards symptoms etc as most of them cannot tell you what is wrong and frequently only show signs of confusion when in fact they are in pain or not well.


    (Jumps down off soap-box and wanders mumbling to herself back into a corner)
  9. 0
    I have worked in many nursing homes in between RMN, RN and other qualifications that included Aged Care and Paediatrics. I also started nursing some 35 years ago by working as a nursing assistant in a nursing home.
    I now work nights (casually) for several nursing homes filling in for sickness and holidays.
    So I have gone full circle. Working in a nursing home is not only a priviledge it is also a place of learning, weaning in new nurses, listenning to all the incredible stories, being with people who have nearly finished their lives and beg the indulgence of a kind word and a helping hand.
    It is good to be able make these people (our clients/patients) prior to their death comfortable and safe, and loved.
    Yes, compassionate and dedicated nurses are needed in nursing homes - just as much; in fact even more at times than in other nursing establishments. (That is with the exception of the hospice.)
    It is a pity that many nursing homes are still short of good staff.
  10. 0
    [QUOTE=Mister Chris]I have worked in many nursing homes.

    Further to the observations above, yes there are many not-so-hot nursing homes but I will not name them here. I have worked in both good and bad but have never, never allowed myself to have a bad attitude about it.

    Not only are the organisers to blame - but so is the funding and the "second rate" atitude that comes along with the nursing home stigma.

    It should be a priviledge to work in a nursing home. The Mid-wives bring them in and we (the Geriatric/aged care nurses) see them out!

    Yes a priviledge. :angryfire
  11. 0
    State inspector thinks it's easy? How did this person qualify to inspect nursing homes? Scary.


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