Saudi Arabia???? Anybody know?

  1. Anybody out there to help clarify some things about working in Saudi Arabia? I was talking with another nurse the other day and she had some experience working there, but supposedly came to the USA to get two years experience, so she could return there as an American and make more money. She told me that you can live in private housing (all paid, naturally), make up to $100,000 (American) and get every fourth month off with pay, to travel to wherever you want to go. (The stuff I'm finding on the web does not support any of that). Whether or not any of this is true, I am interested in hearing what anyone of you has to say about your experience working there. "Just the Facts, Ma'm". I want to know EVERYTHING, from how it was to work in the hospital (pros and cons), what it was like living on the compound (how much you can 'let your hair down' and such; ie no veils), what you encountered when off the compound (troubles or not), etc. Did you earn your money hourly or were you salary and working lots of hours? And, when you returned to the USA (if that's where you live), did you have to pay a big lump-sum of taxes on what you earned tax-free over seas??? Thank you so much for responding; any and all information will be much appreciated. (here's a little kiss in advance).:kiss **** BY THE WAY; I'M A TRAVELING NURSE WHO IS IN NEED OF A PARTNER/FRIEND TO SHARE THE EXPERIENCE WITH. (Not necessarily Saudi; I miss the Western States, too). ANYONE OUT THERE WHO MIGHT BE INTERESTED, PLEASE LET ME KNOW...
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  2. 30 Comments

  3. by   tonasket56
    I too would like some info from someone that has lived and worked in Saudia Arabia. I am ready to fill out the job app. but am leary....I would love to chat with someone just to get a feel about how nurses( and women) are treated. Please share if you have ever been there or worked there. Thanks
  4. by   tgibson3770
    Contact Saudi Arabia embassy.
  5. by   renerian
    Zoe I think has been there. If she sees this post she will respond for sure.

    renerian
  6. by   babylog2012
    One of my best friends went to Saudi Arabia ~2 years ago and she wasn't very happy at all. It's true that you're earning heaps of money but the conditions're not the best.
    As a woman it was difficult to defend herself in talking to patients as they simlpy didn't take her seriously. As a crich country the monitoring e.g. was one of the best, high tech all over!She didn't live in private homes rather than in a house (sharing kitchen and bath facilities with other) which looked like a prison, small windows, bed cupboard...no table,chair.. When she phoned in sick they controlled her means they just visited her without phoning before to see whether she's really sick or just simulating!! She worked time on and off means a couple of weeks full-time and then a couple of weeks off but she couldn't really travel as it was so dangerous for a western woman to go on her own. She's learned a lot specially about the culture and how to handle things but she wouldn't do it again. I'm sure there's somebody out there who's made different experiences.
  7. by   Brownms46
    I came across a website during my travels online, but can't remember where it was. If I come across it again I will post it. I did run into a travel nurse in S. C. who went to Saudi, and she said she enjoyed it..except for a few things, that may have changed by now.

    She couldn't drive and had to stay on the compound, where she was housed, unless accompanied by a male. Had to wear long sleeves, and be totally covered when out. After seeing some of the niteclubs on some of the news programs, a lot of that may have changed.

    She did say it helped her get out of debt, paying off all of her loans, and she would go back again.
  8. by   VivaLasViejas
    I could never live in a country that equates the capability of driving a car with having a penis.
  9. by   Brownms46
    Originally posted by mjlrn97
    I could never live in a country that equates the capability of driving a car with having a penis.
    :roll
  10. by   Euskadi1946
    Quote from Brownms46
    I came across a website during my travels online, but can't remember where it was. If I come across it again I will post it. I did run into a travel nurse in S. C. who went to Saudi, and she said she enjoyed it..except for a few things, that may have changed by now.

    She couldn't drive and had to stay on the compound, where she was housed, unless accompanied by a male. Had to wear long sleeves, and be totally covered when out. After seeing some of the niteclubs on some of the news programs, a lot of that may have changed.

    She did say it helped her get out of debt, paying off all of her loans, and she would go back again.
    Wow Brownie, I don't know about nightclubs in Saudi Arabia. It's the very seat of Islam and I know for a fact that smoking and drinking alcohol are forbidden. My mom's cousin and her husband lived in Saudi for 8 yrs because he worked for Aramco, made great bucks and retired young. She told us that she hated every minute of it because it was so restrictive and having to be covered from head to toe especially in the heat was terribly uncomfortable. Plus women, especially foreign women are treated as 2nd class citizens. The positive I have heard though is that when your assignment is up you will have a nice, fat bank account because there is no place to spend money.... :uhoh21:
  11. by   elkpark
    Keep in mind, also, that several of those "compounds" where the American workers live in Saudi Arabia have been bombed lately ...
  12. by   suzanne4
    There are actually restrictions in place on US citizens travelling to Saudi Arabia right now. Of course, this thread was originally started some time in 2003.
  13. by   mscsrjhm
    Quote from mjlrn97
    I could never live in a country that equates the capability of driving a car with having a penis.


    Perhaps it actually helps.. balance or something?
  14. by   weetziebat
    Just to put in my two cents worth - as I don't imagine you are thinking about going to Saudi Arabia at this time. I worked in Riyadh for seven years and absolutely loved every second of it. Was treated with friendship and respect, the patients were great, met people from all over the world and made terrific friends, lived in a lovely private apartment on a beautiful compound, had swimming pools and exercise rooms right on the compound, the working conditions couldn't have been nicer (worked 44 hours a week, but much less stressful than nursing here and my foreign coworkers were a much more positive bunch than those I work with here also , shopped till I dropped - lots of gold , had the opportunity to travel all over the world, made excellent money - salary was tax free up to $70,000. U.S.D. with no taxes due on return home, received a free round trip ticket home yearly, the only bills I paid were long distance telephone and food, and, after spending all the money I wanted I still returned home with enough to put a lovely down payment on a house, buy all furniture and new car with cash, take a few months off and put $25,000. in savings. Who could ask for more?

    On the negative side, the poor mail service drove me crazy. It was difficult to buy books I wanted due to censorship (National Geographic magazine came with at least half the pages either torn out or blacked out and cost something like $8.), and found it tough to shop because of all the stores closing four times a day for prayer. My shopping was done between 10 a.m. to noon, and then from ~4 to 6p.m. and ~8 TO 10 P.M. - which doesn't sound bad but was annoying when you have to take taxis home because there is no where to go between shopping times. Its not like you can just stop at a coffee shop or go to a movie. When I went our we covered our clothes with a light silk cloak (abaya) and carried headscarves in case the religious police told us to cover our hair.
    And as far as driving goes, believe me when I say you would NOT want to drive with those crazy drivers. Making left hand turns from the right lane, paying no attention to lanes etc. Although it is getting a lot better now, and in time I think women will be allowed to drive there.

    I can wholeheartedly say that the time I spent living in Saudi Arabia was some of the best years of my life, and still have American friends working there who refuse to leave, despite the current problems.

    Oh yeah, I also got 12 weeks vacation a year. Took a trip every two to three months so it was like working between travels
    Last edit by weetziebat on Jul 15, '04

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