Nursing schools in Montreal Canada

  1. 0
    Hello,
    I am new to this site, i found it to be very interesting and helpful...fom what i read....so i joined!
    I am looking for Nursing schools in Mtl Canada, i started my pre-reqs here in the US bt i have not yet completed them, i wld like to complete them in a community college in Canada and then go ahead and start the program there.Please help me with any websites or Nursing schools you know of in Mtl. I am a US citizen, i am fluent in French and English.Im looking to move to Mtl next year!Thank you for your help!
  2. 6 Comments so far...

  3. 0
    Hello and welcome to allnurses. We hope you will enjoy the site.

    I moved your thread to the Canadian nurses forum where I think you will get more responses.

    Good luck!
  4. 0
    Concordia might be a good place to do pre-req's, and I think McGill has a nursing school. UdeM is cheaper but 100% French, probably has nursing but not sure.

    FYI ... if you don't have citizenship, you are going to pay through the nose for being an international student. And you will need to be legitimately fluent in French to go to nursing school in Quebec (aka above and beyond US high school French).

    It will GREATLY expedite your moving process if you are already accepted to a school before trying to get a visa. And you will probably need bank statements (yours and parents) proving that you have x amount of money to be supported by while you are there.
  5. 0
    Quote from coast2coast
    Concordia might be a good place to do pre-req's, and I think McGill has a nursing school. UdeM is cheaper but 100% French, probably has nursing but not sure.

    FYI ... if you don't have citizenship, you are going to pay through the nose for being an international student. And you will need to be legitimately fluent in French to go to nursing school in Quebec (aka above and beyond US high school French).

    It will GREATLY expedite your moving process if you are already accepted to a school before trying to get a visa. And you will probably need bank statements (yours and parents) proving that you have x amount of money to be supported by while you are there.
    Thank you for the info!!!McGill does have a Nursing program but I really would prefer a community college to lower the costs....i am an American Citizen but lived in France for close to 10 years and went to a French High school so i am pretty fleunt in French, i wouldnt mind doing everything in French...
    I think you are absolutely right, i should apply and get in to a school first....that is what i intend to do...i will actually plan on going to Mtl pretty soon but im sure most of the schools will be closed for the holidays!!
    Thx again!
    Last edit by NotReady4PrimeTime on Dec 13, '10 : Reason: eliminated shorthand - please use proper English spelling and grammar
  6. 0
    Quote from tnbutterfly
    Hello and welcome to allnurses. We hope you will enjoy the site.

    I moved your thread to the Canadian nurses forum where I think you will get more responses.

    Good luck!
    Thank you!!!!!Thats a great idea!!!!
  7. 0
    Hi! I've been also researching possibilities to study in Montreal and i found that McGill University School of Nursing has slightly different prerequisits (9 courses totally):

    Intro Physics - Mechanics
    Intro Physics - Electromagnetism
    Calculus 1
    Calculus 2
    General Chemistry 1
    General Chemistry 2
    Intro Organic Chemistry 1
    Cell and Molecular Biology
    Development Over the Lifespan OR 3 credit elective

    Tuition for international students: CAD$ 15,000 and up
    But if you'll get a Canadian citizenship it'll be CAD$ 2,000 (for Quebec residents)
  8. 1
    If you are looking for English colleges you can go to Varnier or Dawson or John Abbot (colleges are called CEGEP here). You can also easily Google CEGEP for French speaking ones. Most have the winter break schedules posted. You will have to apply for the equivalent of a student visa and, as has been said and bears repeating, you will pay big bucks whereas you cold get a similar inexpensive education in a US community college.

    Personally I would advise against your plan and I say this having attended a US community college, a US university, then passed the NCLEX and then the Quebec OIIQ test, both within the last couple of years.

    The Quebec CEGEPs require 3 years of attendance. You could do two years at a US community college and then enter a US accelerated university BSN program for 18 months which would make you eligible for higher pay in either country for only an extra 6 months of study.

    I found the NCLEX multiple choice test challenging even though it only lasted 2 hours and I passed it the first time. The Quebec equivalent lasts two days (one day of hands on clinical and one day of short answer questions). However I found it substaintially easier and also passed it on the first try. A significant number of my colleagues educated here fail it though, and it appears to me that they have not been taught the depth of knowledge that I have learned in the USA. It surprises me, considering that here the colleges tend to dedicate a one semester class to teaching students how to succeed in taking the test. There were no such classes in the USA for NCLEX unless you want to enroll for a private tutoring service.

    Basically I went from difficult to easy, but if you were to get your degree here, you would have to go back to the states to pass the NCLEX, whichi is the hard part. Why not just work here, you may ask? Well, that opens an immigration can of worms. Americans cannot just immigrate to Canada/Quebec. You have to go through a lengthy process that can take a couple of years and lots of paperwork. Only people in specific labor shortage categories (such as nursing) get qualified, but I don't know if you qualify without a BSN. Plenty of doctors from other countries qualify to come here and Americans get no particular immigration priority except that the English documents do not need to be translated.

    Also be warned that this is NOT France. Most of the people may speak a version of French (some of which you will not understand when it is spoken) but attitudes are much different. Despite official pretense of brotherhood, the French and Quebecers frequently criticize each other at an individual level. A French friend of mine came last year and could not put up with the people here. She moved to Toronto. Sarkosy last year said "Quebecers are our brothers, but Canadians are our friends." You can put any spin you want on that, but to me it refers that we don't get to choose our brothers and have to put up with them, but we do get to choose our friends.

    A couple of more points on the finances should be pointed out. The Quebec nursing exam costs twice has much as the NCLEX (those actors pretending to have illnesses need to be paid) and the yearly license fee is 10 times as much in Quebec as in the US state where I am also licensed.
    Last edit by just4 on Dec 26, '10
    fatima100 likes this.


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