moving to USA from London

  1. I want to study nursing in america and have just sent an application for a college in LA but my mum also wants to work there as well. she is taking a course in NVQ Level 3 Care but all her work mates say that she is wasting her time because they dont believe that her qualifications in London will be accepted in America. Is this true? Is she really wasting her time? My personal opinion is that she should finish the course because any qualification will help get a job and it is a British qualification. She has only been working as a Carer for one and half years.

    We're moving over in July and she has booked a return ticket for mid- August but only because she is going to come back here to finish off her course. So i really need to know whether its worth her coming back to London or not. Any suggestions?
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  2. 13 Comments

  3. by   sanakruz
    Foreign born nurses have to take an exam and pass it in order to be licensed.Each state has different licensing reguirements.California does not have what is called reciprosity;you must have a CA license to work here.
    I do not recall the name of the test! Sorry!
    Is she a registered nurse? I am almost certain that there is a place in the UK where the test amy be taken. You do not have to travel HERE to do so.
    Maybe others have more info for you.Good luck!!
  4. by   Rocknurse
    To work as a nurse in America you need to pass the NCLEX and fulfil immigration requirements. To study in America is very expensive. Any other job requires at least a higher level degree. Anything less than that is not generally accepted, and you need to have a firm job offer before applying for a visa. It can take a very long time to get any sort of visa to stay in America longer than 3 months. So far, including studying for and taking my NCLEX, it has taken me over a year and a half to get my green card and I am still waiting.

    What kind of visa is your mum travelling on this time? What kind of work does she do? America is the hardest country in the world to enter for any length of time, and certainly the hardest to work in. Visas are incredibly difficult to get. You may find it easier and cheaper to study in the UK and then get sponsored to go to the States once you are qualified. Nurses and doctors are the only professionals that can get a green card based on employment.
    Last edit by Rocknurse on May 21, '03
  5. by   Orca
    A chip-in from an American nurse about studying here: It can be very expensive, especially for foreign students. The least-expensive schools are the state-supported ones. They add a large premium per credit hour for residents of other states, and many charge a premium above and beyond out-of-state tuition for international students. Private universities are immensely expensive, costing a year's income or more per year of study. There is financial aid available, but foreign students cannot qualify for many of the programmes.

    Unless you plan to permanently reside in the US, it would probably be much more practical to obtain your training in the UK, then secure a travel assignment in the US for the cultural and professional experience if you would like.

    As far as practicing here, there is no uniform national standard for nursing, and no national licence (at least at present, although this has been discussed before). Each state has its own board of nursing and nurse practice act governing scope of practice and standards of conduct. You must obtain a licence from each state you practice in at additional cost. Once you obtain your first US licence, most states have what is called licensure by endorsement (meaning that you can obtain a licence by submitting the application and fee and using your current licence as proof of practice and competency).

    For information on licensure in California, here is the URL for the California Board of Nursing website:

    http://www.rn.ca.gov

    The California website does say the following, confirming what someone said above:

    If you have never passed the U.S. national licensing examination (NCLEX or SBTPE), you do not qualify for endorsement licensure. You must apply to take the examination instead.

    This means that a UK licence does not directly qualify you for a California licence. You would have to take the licencing examination first. The exam is now given by computer rather than the two-day paper test that was used in the past.

    You mentioned Los Angeles. You must also consider that LA is one of the most expensive cities in the US to live in. Rental costs are astronomical. Traffic is horrid (I visit the area every two months or so). If you definitely decide to study in the US, you may want to consider an area with a lower cost of living. Generally speaking, the midwest states offer a much more affordable lifestyle than the more populous coastal ones.

    Ironically, I am considering taking an assignment in the UK for an extended period, and perhaps even permanent residence there.

    If you want further information, I will gladly try to answer any questions you have.
    Last edit by Orca on Jun 4, '03
  6. by   J. Tigana
    Francelita, I may be cynical but why study nursing in the u.s. where you have to pay tuition. In the U.K. you will be paid a bursuary and will not have to pay tuition. Once you finish the training here you are free to go to America. There are many agencies and hospitals which are willing to sponsor your immigration. You must, of course take and pass the Nclex, once you have done this it should be easy. You will have to pass this exam even if you train in America, anyway.
    As for your mother. I don't know what level of training healthcare assistants recieve in America. I'm sure thay will not recognise NVQs. They are barely recognised here. From my experience people take those courses and recieve no recognition for the qualification, in the form of promotion or higher rate of pay.
    Anyway good luck with whatever you do.
  7. by   tarry65
    Hi,

    British qualifications are accepted worldwide.So please tell your mother to complete studies.You have taken right decision.
    All the best. LA is the best place to work as there are lots of job oppertunities for the nurses.

    I need your help. Here i have lots of Indian nurses who have got NMC decision letter (NMC PIN no.) who wants to do supervised/adaption practice.Can u refer to some hospitals or nursing homes.
    Also I have got immidiate requirement for nurses who do not need supervised practice for U.K. Do u have any freinds.Please let me know
    Regards
    Tarun Gupta
    E.mail---- tarry65@yahoo.com
  8. by   Rocknurse
    The only British qualifications recognised in America for immigration purposes are 4 year degrees, with the exception of nurses, where the RGN or diploma is acceptable. However, you would still have to take the US NCLEX as well as completing the UK qualification. NVQs and similar are not recognised for immigration purposes.
  9. by   CCURN
    When I moved to the USA, I had to take and pass the CGFNS exam before I was able to take the NCLEX. Also, in order to be able to take the CGFNS you have to be an adult trained nurse, and cannot be of any of the other branches.
    If you are moving to the USA and can afford the training, then I suggest you study in the USA, as it will be less hassle once you have finished the training. Also from experience, trying to get your credits from the UK evauluated is a pain in the you know what.
  10. by   sashibeak
    Hey Everyone!

    I am from the UK, but am training to be a nurse here in Florida. I have received a full scholarship from a local hospital........they want me to work for them once I have graduated.


    Does anyone know which direction I should go now with immigration? I am currently on a F1 student visa. If the hospital sponsors me, maybe? I have heard something about needing to apply for a H1 visa?????????

    I would be thrilled if anyone could give me some advice. My college doesn't have a clue and I feel like I am going round in circles!!

    Thank you!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
  11. by   CCURN
    Look at the CGFNS.org website, and you would probably need to contact a immigration lawyer.
  12. by   NursingUSA
    Any international Nurse coming into the US will need to take the NCLEX, CGFNS (depending on what state), TOEFL/TSE (depending on how well your spoken english is or if your nursing education was in english or not). Some states have reciprocity and some do not...it is best to contact a specific nursing board in the US of which you plan on going to and finding out their process. I know California's process time right now is about 5-6 months due to the high demand of applicants. FYI - make sure your education is equal the educational requirements in the US!! Good Luck!
  13. by   welshborg
    :hatparty:
    Quote from sashibeak
    Hey Everyone!

    I am from the UK, but am training to be a nurse here in Florida. I have received a full scholarship from a local hospital........they want me to work for them once I have graduated.


    Does anyone know which direction I should go now with immigration? I am currently on a F1 student visa. If the hospital sponsors me, maybe? I have heard something about needing to apply for a H1 visa?????????

    I would be thrilled if anyone could give me some advice. My college doesn't have a clue and I feel like I am going round in circles!!

    Thank you!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
    sashabeak, i desperately want to train in florida. i don't know if you will get this message but i would be grateful for any suggestions you may have regarding how you gained scholarship for nurse training. the visa you require is H1B for specialised occupations.
  14. by   louise1
    hi, im new to this forum, and was wondering if anyone can give me some information about the agencies offering jobs, green cards etc to USA?

    i am really wanting to live there once i qualify ( i have just began my training in the UK), and i was wondering about the wages, time to get a job, credibility of these agencies? any info would be appreciated from nurses who have experianced work with an agency, or an American nurse who maybe has some info too!!
    Cheers, lou

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