Male nursing in the OR?

  1. Hey everyone

    I'm a male student graduating from highschool right away, and I've been accepted into NEPS (Nursing education program of Saskatchewan) and, when I graduate, I will be an RN.

    I'm really interested in Perioperative Nursing, but I'm kind of lost. Does anyone know how I would go about specializing into this field? Also, does a Perioperative Nurse get paid around the same as an ordinary RN?

    Thanks a lot to anyone who can help
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  2. 14 Comments

  3. by   chartleypj
    DMR1,


    Find out if your nursing program has a perioperative rotation. If not, while doing your surgical rotation request the opportunity to follow a pt. to the OR then take care of him/her post op. Let your instructors know about your interest in the OR. Find out if your nursing program offers a periop course for RN's interested in the OR.
    If you can make the time to work, try to get a job as an orderly in your local hospital, preferrably in the OR. This will give you exposure to the periop. setting. If you cannot work can you volunteer a few hours a week in an OR as an orderly?

    I do not receive any differential pay for being an OR nurse or having my certification in perioperative nursing.
    Good luck !

    Paula
  4. by   DMR1
    Thank you very much!
  5. by   DMR1
    Oh, another question, is there a demand for RN's who specialize in Perioperative? I'm really interested in this field, and want to know if there is a demand for it.
  6. by   tues
    I work in an operating room, and we have several Male nurses who work with us. In Ontario either a Post graduate O.R. nursing course or two years experience required. I know that there are also courses available in other provinces. If you go to the ORNAC website there may be some info there too. I have spent thirty years in an O.R. and there is always something new to learn as technology and procedures change. We have the advantages of working for all of the surgical specialties, or staying in one area. Saskatchewan has the Saskatchewan Operating Room Nurses Group (SORNG). I'm sure they will have a website, and they can likely give you more info. Best of luck! It is an interesting field to work in, not to mention the fact that we always need O.R. nurses.
    Last edit by tues on Jun 19, '03
  7. by   RNFA
    Hi There, So you've completed your high school education - Congratulations! Entering a Nursing Program will have you open your mind to many possibilities! However, if after you've completed your Program and you still desire a future in the Operating Room - I would suggest you take an additional course in the Peri-Operative modality. Once you've worked in the O.R. for a minimum of two years - do go for your certification certificate in this speciliazed field...and my suggestion - don't stop there! After five years in the O.R. - you may be interested in the extended peri-operative career field of Registered Nurse First Assistant... close to you in B.C. is a wonderful program at B.C.I.T.for this newly accepted and recognized position. And yes it offers an increase in wages over present Peri-Operative R.N. Positions.
  8. by   Sarah, RNBScN
    I know two RNFA's in Ontario and they have yet to be paid different than their RN wages at a hospital where they work. There is too much red tape for billing and procedure...so they have yet to work in that role. Secondly, one of the RN's isn't going to the states to write her big EXAM that allows her to use the title RNFA and she did her training via BCIT. I just think what a waste. That's like doing your schooling for RN and not writing your exam to be called RN.

    Where did you do your RNFA?
    Did you do the course and then write your exam?
    Please fill me in on more...I am curious to compare the differences.
  9. by   RNFA
    I did take the RNFA program through BCIT - I am papered to practice and do practice in Ontario... our hospital after various meetings with our union agreed to pay over and above our RN level of pay...we pushed for this recognition of additional preparation for the extended role.
    True not all hospitals are doing this - unfortunately... And while many hospitals however approve of the role of the RNFA - they are not prepared to bring them on board - often as not to upset the G.P. pool of assistants available to them... the choice is often a political one over a practical one...
  10. by   Sarah, RNBScN
    RNFA,

    I am curious as to what you mean by

    RNFA wrote:
    "I am papered to practice and do practice in Ontario... "

    Did you write your formal exam that allows you to have the title of RNFA after RN? If so, what state did you have to write in. Was it costly?

    RNFA wrote:
    our hospital after various meetings with our union agreed to pay over and above our RN level of pay...

    Your location states you reside in Ontario, you would fall under the same union as two of my coworkers. I am curious to see what wage difference your union provided you with. Also, RNFA role is not a unionized position so are you accumulating RN seniority along with this while you work even though it is not a RN position. Please advise. I think what you have strived for and got is wonderful and perhaps you wouldn't mind me sharing this information with the two gals I work with.

    Let me know.
    Many thanks,
    Sarah
  11. by   tues
    I think there is some confusion. You do not need to be a RNFA (Registered Nurse First Assistant) to work in the O.R. Most places do request a post-graduate Operating Room Nursing Course. These are generally offered at community colleges, with a clinical placement done at participating hospitals. The course can either be done part time over a year, with a 3 month clinical, or can be done full time in a shorter length of time. Some hospitals will give training on the job. This allows you to either scrub (hand up the instruments) or circulate. The O.R. is a very diverse area to work in. The technology is always changing and there is always something new to learn. The RNFA role is to assist the surgeon during surgery, a role a resident in a teaching hospital usually does, write post op orders, do preop teaching etc. and is attained through universities. ORNAC does have information about this on their web site.
  12. by   RNFA
    Yes it is true you do not need to be an RNFA to work in an O.R. - My original comment was that the option is now becoming available to Canadian Nurses to become an RNFA - Two Schools at present have the program B.C.I.T. in British Columbia and another school in Quebec... which at the moment I cannot remember the name (sorry)... I have completed my program through B.C.I.T. - the bulk of the course is through long distance learning and a mentor (Surgeon) which you are teamed up with who agrees to teach the role of the assistant during surgery. A didactic week is also part of the program which usually takes place in British Coloumbia where a variety of learning needs are covered...upon successful completion of the course - you then forge a path to becoming employed as an RNFA - not so easy at this stage of it's introduction to Canada... Yes, the United States and many other countries do employ RNFA's and have had them as part of their team for over 30 years...
  13. by   Sarah, RNBScN
    Tues:

    Would you please fill me in on the following questions?

    Did you write your formal exam that allows you to have the title of RNFA after RN? If so, what state did you have to write in. Was it costly?


    Your location states you reside in Ontario, you would fall under the same union as two of my coworkers. I am curious to see what wage difference your union provided you with. Also, RNFA role is not a unionized position so are you accumulating RN seniority along with this while you work even though it is not a RN position. Please advise. I think what you have strived for and got is wonderful and perhaps you wouldn't mind me sharing this information with the two gals I work with.

    Let me know.
    Many thanks,
    Sarah
  14. by   tues
    Sarah: I think you wanted me to respond. I am not an RNFA, but a staff nurse in the O.R. with an enhanced role. My role includes Laser Safety Officer, MIS and Clinical Resource Nurse. I work in the rooms, both scrubbing and circulating, as well as Orientate all of the new staff, look after all of our MIS stuff, teach laser courses and safety and look after the lasers. I am in a union position, and at the top of the salary range, which is just over $33.00 per hour. I have worked in this particular O.R. for 20 years, and have a total of 30 years in operating rooms. I hope this answers your questions.

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